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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/12/2006 6:42:16 AM EDT
I received from of my Grandfather's coins via my mother yesterday, and as I was adding to my books I found quite a strange misstrike, one that I cannot find listed anywhere, any of you ever seen/heard of this?

It is a 1971D, with a very well-kept front with a nice patina. But it has "no back". It's gone, and it was never there. Like, not just unstruck, but 1/2 of the mass of the penny is gone, with slight raised edges on obverse. From this side, one can see ghosts of both the front AND the memorial on back, indicating at least a light strike, I believe. Due to the inconsistency of the obverse surface and the prescence of ghost images, I do not believe anything post-production could have created this anomoly.

So, anyone know about this?




Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:43:30 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:43:30 AM EDT
tagged.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:43:50 AM EDT
Let me get a bottle of jack.. and then I'll stare at the pic for awhile.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:46:15 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:49:27 AM EDT
I don't know and I have no idea of value but I have a cousin that found a quarter that was similar. The head side was perfect but the reverse was unstamped. Our guess was that two coin billets (or what ever they are called) got into the press at the same time. It has been many years since I have seen that coin but my Uncle is a pretty serious coin collector so I am sure he still has it.

It would be real cool to find the other half of this assuming yours is from a double feed too!
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:49:32 AM EDT
Brother is a coin collector. I called him, he thinks it was an off size blank before it was struck on either side but he's not sure. Based on that condition he said when it's older it could be worth a lot of bank. He's an amateur but he knows a little.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:50:59 AM EDT
You know it's only worth 1/2¢
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:52:57 AM EDT
If'n I remember correctly, you have a "split planchet" coin. Might be worth some dough to a serious collector.

More info about coin errors and goofs.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 6:53:32 AM EDT
I forget the technical name of it, but the previous penny didn't get ejected from the dies and the new planchet (techical term for unstruck coin) got struck by the obverse die and the unejected previous penny. Somewhere there's a penny that's all mucked up, there could be more than 1 misstrikes like yours. Cool find. Probably worth $50 or maybe more
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:04:44 AM EDT
Sell it on Ebay. Claim you can see Jesus in the blank side. You will make a million.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:10:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 7:22:27 AM EDT by NAM]
was just looking at it here at work, and a coworker peeked over my shoulder.

said it looks like a "shell" penny. For magic tricks.

"The shim shell is the exact same size as a penny, but is only a shell, so you can hide other coins underneath it. The shim is also able to stick to a magnet.
The expanded shell is a shell that is slightly larger than a penny, and is made to fit over the penny(thus, for example, making it look like you have two coins in your hand, and when the shell fits over the half, now you only have one).
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:13:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By VooDoo3dfx:
Let me get a bottle of jack.. and then I'll stare at the pic for awhile.




[mallrats]
It's a schooner.

You dumb bastard, it's a sailboat.
[/mallrats]
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:18:44 AM EDT
Mint errors are worth a lot to collectors, one of the few things I know about numistology, or whatever coin-collecting's properly called.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:20:07 AM EDT
called a "capped die" per http://www.coinworld.com/NewCollector/Errors/Striking.asp


Brockage and capped die strikes: If a newly struck coin sticks to the surface of one of the dies, it acts as a die itself - called a die cap - and produces images on succeeding coins. The image produced by any die is the direct opposite on a coin, and brockages
are no different. Since the image is raised on the coin adhering to the die, the image on the brockage is incused and reversed - a true mirror image. The first brockage strikes, perfect mirror images and undistorted, are most prized. As additional coins are struck from the capped die, the die cap begins to spread and thin under the pressures of striking, distorting its image. At some point, as the die cap becomes more distorted, the coins struck cease to be brockages and are known as capped die strikes.

While a brockage image is undistorted or relatively so, images on capped die strikes are increasingly malformed. Although the image is recognizable, the design expands, producing an image that can be several times the normal size. Finally, the die cap breaks off or is pounded so thin it ceases to affect succeeding strikes. Sometimes, the die caps fall off early and in a relatively undistorted state. Die caps resemble bottle caps, with the metal wrapping around the surface of the die. Die caps are very rare and collectible, much more so than capped die strikes.

Link Posted: 1/12/2006 7:47:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
Brother is a coin collector. I called him, he thinks it was an off size blank before it was struck on either side but he's not sure. Based on that condition he said when it's older it could be worth a lot of bank. He's an amateur but he knows a little.



This is a true stmt...strikes like this one are very rare and as such command premium prices. OTOH its a niche collectors market so a sale would have to be directed to a fairly narrow audience.

I used to have an old V nickel that showed considerable die damage. The coin itself wasnt worth that much but b/c it was an oddity the price I got was about 10x its normal value.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 8:30:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 8:34:19 AM EDT by neilfj]
Based on the rim visible in the photo, it doesn't look like a minting error. Minting errors don't cause a uniform rim like that in the photo. The rim appears to be much thinner than the rim is on the front. It sure looks like the 'shell' previously mentioned. But, it could also be 1/2 of a counterfeit or novelty item. There have been cases of people milling out the inside of 1 coin, using a 2nd coin and milling off the entire back and edge and putting them together to get a double headed coin, or a coin that is 1/2 penny, 1/2 dime, etc. Hard to tell for sure from the photos.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 8:36:37 AM EDT
ebay capped die.

ebay link

Link Posted: 1/12/2006 8:39:26 AM EDT
I've got a penny that was never struck properly and got circulated. It looks blank except for the slightly raised edges and the ghost of Lincoln on one side and the memorial on the other.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 12:42:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 12:43:13 PM EDT by OFFascist]
I have a quarter that is blank on both sides, only way I knew it was a quarter was that it was the same shape and had the edging, and you can see the copper sandwiched.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 3:23:24 PM EDT
I'll send you a crisp, well struck $20 bill for it right now.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 5:33:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By legalese77:

Originally Posted By VooDoo3dfx:
Let me get a bottle of jack.. and then I'll stare at the pic for awhile.




[mallrats]
It's a schooner.

You dumb bastard, it's a sailboat.
[/mallrats]



A schooner is a sailboat, stupidhead.
Link Posted: 1/12/2006 5:36:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/12/2006 5:38:09 PM EDT by Misery]
Weren't they made by hand back then?

I was born in '72, so don't get all defensive about ages.
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