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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 12/8/2002 3:59:24 AM EDT
A guy that works for me has a bow for sale: It's a Hoyt USA Gamegetter II. I know close to nothing about bows. It does need a new string, and peep sight thingy. He wants $60 Is this a deal?
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 4:15:46 AM EDT
$60 bucks for a bow, if it's in good shape, can't be a bad deal. I'd leave the peep sight off though. I have had to let deer pass in early morning and late evening light situations because of a peep. Just maintain the same anchor point every time and look at the pins. I went back to my recurve and no sights because it seemed more fun. To each his own.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 4:32:59 AM EDT
I'd say it's a good deal as long as it's still shootable.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 5:31:14 AM EDT
$60 for a Hoyt, I'd be all over it. Not sure about that model, but most of them new cost around $400 - $600
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 5:38:31 AM EDT
I agree with Pangea, nix the peep sight. Absolutely worthless in low light conditions. The one thing I would check on the bow is if the limbs are warped. If not, it would be a good bow to start shooting. One warning; Either you will like bow hunting or hate it. If you like it, get out your wallet, because just like those "Evil Black Rifles" there's always more, more, more. I've been bowhunting for 24 years and still find it the most rewarding and satisfying type of hunting. Good luck!!!
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 5:46:20 AM EDT
how do I tell if they are warped? They look straight to me. it still has a string on it, it is just real ratty looking. If I nix the peep sight, do I need to remove the little aiming points too? I truly don't know a thing about bows.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 5:53:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By crumabn: how do I tell if they are warped? They look straight to me. it still has a string on it, it is just real ratty looking. If I nix the peep sight, do I need to remove the little aiming points too? I truly don't know a thing about bows.
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Tell the guy that before you buy it you want to take it to see how much it's going to cost to get it restrung, etc. Then take it to a bow shop and have him look it over and he'll be able to tell you if there is anything wrong with it. You probably won't want to take off the pins, even without the peep until you get a little better with it. You'll still use them for aiming, you just won't be looking through the peep. Kind of like having a rifle with a front sight, but not a rear. I do have a few friends that don't use any sights on their bows, but most of them have been shooting since they were really small and are excellent shots.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 5:59:18 AM EDT
Well here's the cool part, He let me take it home "to mess with," I'll see if I can find a bow shop and have them take a look. Anyone know of a good archery shop in the Dayton area? I think I recall old english had an archery department.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 6:06:10 AM EDT
If you do not know anything about shooting bows may I suggest finding a local bow range, telling them you are as green as green gets when it comes to shooting a bow. Bow people are generally down to earth and like it when a person takes interest in their sport. They will be more than happy to teach you. Consistancy is the key to archery as in any shooting sport, and of course, practice, practice, practice.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 6:11:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/8/2002 6:12:34 AM EDT by 50cal]
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 6:21:40 AM EDT
Check the draw length.Its not going to be fun to shoot if the bow is too long or short for you,A good archery shop should be able help you out. Find another experieced archer/bowhunter to help you with the basics.As far as the string being worn - the last owner did not wax the string enough,Wax= string life. One word of caution,Make sure the arrows match the bows weight of pull,and are long enough for the draw. Archery/bowhunting has been apart of my life since I was 13,I've had so much fun hunting and shooting bows over the years,It's a great hobby and with todays bows,I feel there are really no "bad" ones out there.It's a sport that will force you get closer to the game your hunting. Good luck. Jimmo
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 6:23:20 AM EDT
Good advice from everyone here, I would like to also add be sure the bow fits you, by that I mean what is the draw length of the bow and what is the draw length you need. My draw length is 29in, I looked at a used bow that a co-worker had but the draw length was off, so I ordered a new bow, a PSE DIAMONDBACK, great bow. Also do you you know what your arrow cut length is, that is also important. If you can find a good bow shop and ask them to help fit you to a bow, the bow you are thinking about buying may be just right for you. I have seen alot of people buy a bow that does not fit them and then they loose interest in the sport when they cant shoot the bow very good. A bow that is properly fitted to you will feel like a extension of your body and with practice you will be able to drill them big bucks with ease. You will find it to be a challenging and rewarding sport. Also if you plan on hunting with it, you will get hooked, when I took my first buck with a bow I was forever hooked, nothing can compare to bow hunting, I like to rifle hunt but if given the chance I will bow hunt any time over rifle hunting, alot more rewarding experiance.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 8:20:22 AM EDT
Nix the peep? If you're that green have fun wounding deer. It's kinda like removing the rear sight on your AR. If you get good enough you can shoot instinct but it takes a lot of practice. Besides if it's too dark to see through your peep you don't need to be shooting. Sorry about the rant I've just seen too many poor shots made that leave deer running around with arrows sticking in non lethal places. [:(]
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 8:30:53 AM EDT
Hmm...all the ranting I forgot what I was going to say. Hoyt does makes good bows. That's probably not a bad price. I would take everyones advice and try it out. Most things on a bow are made to replace. Lot's of moving parts that wear out. It's a great sport. Have fun.[}:D]
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 1:49:28 PM EDT
Jeapers, You obviously have never seen me shoot, instinctive or with sights. The peep is as necessary as 1/2 the other worthless crap people put on their bows in hopes of tighter groups. It all boils down to taking the time to practice and shot selection. I am truly sorry you feel the need to rely on gadgetry to make up for your lack of shooting skills.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 1:56:43 PM EDT
Thinman I didn't think we were talking about your ability. I'm sure you're a fine instinctive shooter. All I'm saying if you have no experience shooting archery, sights help. Hell maybe he should forget the Hoyt and buy a recurve. Isn't that what real men use?
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 2:15:59 PM EDT
A peep sight has its place on the range or in optimum shooting condition, but in the deep woods where there is little direct light or on the edge of a green field but still in the woods, it will cost you deer. When the light is fading and still bright enough to hunt your deer will disappear in a peep. If you anchor your hand in the same place and hold your form the same way everytime you will do great with pins only. Find a place on your head and use it as a reference. I use the end of my chin. Some use the corner of their mouth. Unless you mutate into other shapes frequently you will be ok.Practice, practice, practice. If your bow has too much draw weight you will find it hard to practice enough to become proficient. Check your draw length. Get someone to measure from the string to about 1 1/2 inch in front of your rest. That is your arrow length to buy. CAUTION! Your arrows must be the proper length and spine! Arrows spined to low will break when released and more than likley go through your hand or wrist. Too short of an arrow will pull off the rest and lay on your arm. That is a scarey feeling my friend when your at full draw. I would highly recomend that you visit [url]www.stickbow.com[/url] Go to their message boards. It's called the Leatherwall. Ask questions till you can't type. They can guide you through any problem or decision you need help with. I have been bow hunting since I was 14. That was 30 years and many deers ago. No way do I consider myself an expert. Just knowledgeable with limitations.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 2:25:15 PM EDT
I've sat and discussed this before with jeapers. I believe that the people he's referring to are the type who've never bow hunted before, but go to the sporting goods store and buy the first bow they like, then hit the woods thinking they're William Tell. jeapers does a lot of deer surveys with our local county agent, and as any good hunter, he hates to see a deer wounded by a weekend warrior.
Link Posted: 12/8/2002 2:42:54 PM EDT
Hoyt makes an excellent bow. You don't have to worry about the layers on the limbs coming unglued as someone mentioned before because that bow doesn't have laminated wood limbs. It sounds like a really good buy, it should only cost you about $20 or less to get a new string put on. I shot a coyote with my bow this morning while deer hunting. Once you get hooked on archery it's hard to stop.
Link Posted: 12/9/2002 7:13:55 AM EDT
Jeapers, After reading your last post and DonR's post I apologize for rather harsh statement. I have always taken great pride in my hunting and shooting, and also can not stand seeing a wounded animal. Too many people are buying the equipment and think that makes them a hunter or a shooter. As in any type of shooting, extensive, in-depth practice and understanding of your weapon is absolutely necessary in order to be a proficient marksman. Unfortunately good marksmanship does not make one a good hunter. Marketing guru's of the sporting goods world have the job of convincing the buying masses that all the gadgets they sell will give you or I the distinct advantage in the field. While I see your point of a novice using a peep, I would also hate to see him/her get wrapped up in all the do-dads and not start with the basics. I was fortunate to have a match shooter teach me the ropes 24 years ago. He was an older man and refused to let me use sights. His theory being that if I learned instinctive shooting I would learn more. To this day I shoot both with and without sights. In short it all boils down to consistancy and lot's of practice. BTW: I'm pretty good at not using the rear sights on AR too.----------practice!
Link Posted: 12/9/2002 7:21:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By crumabn: A guy that works for me has a bow for sale: It's a Hoyt USA Gamegetter II. I know close to nothing about bows. It does need a new string, and peep sight thingy. He wants $60 Is this a deal?
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Didn't mean to 'jack your thread. As stated above, take it to a bow shop, have them look it over and definitly check your [b]draw length[/b]. It sounds like a good deal. As I mentioned before it is an addictive and rewarding sport. Shoot straight.
Link Posted: 12/9/2002 9:03:45 AM EDT
Regarding do-dads on the bow: I'm very much in favor of releases and peep sights. Why? 'Cause I don't practice 3 or 4 days a week all year long like my brother-in-law. He shoots instinctive with only a baseball glove to protect his finger tips. With my release and peep sight I can visit him in September and shoot as well as him after only picking up my bow in August after not touching it since the last season. I drilled out my peep to a larger hole to admit more light and haven't had any problems with it. I have had a release fail while I was hunting once. So beware of releases. I like releases because they allow me to shoot acurately with out years of practice. Just my opinion though... Kent
Link Posted: 12/9/2002 2:03:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thinman:
Originally Posted By crumabn: A guy that works for me has a bow for sale: It's a Hoyt USA Gamegetter II. I know close to nothing about bows. It does need a new string, and peep sight thingy. He wants $60 Is this a deal?
View Quote
Didn't mean to 'jack your thread. As stated above, take it to a bow shop, have them look it over and definitely check your [b]draw length[/b]. It sounds like a good deal. As I mentioned before it is an addictive and rewarding sport. Shoot straight.
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No big deal! I'm actually learning a lot reading all this. To set everyone's minds at ease, I am a very experienced hunter, and will not take a shot, unless I can get a clean kill. If I buy this bow, I will not take it to the woods until I am proficient with it. Thanks for all the advise!
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