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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/5/2001 8:17:26 AM EDT
It looks like it may go on a section of tile floor. It has concrete beneath the tile. I may also secure it to a carpeted area that has concrete directly below the carpet also. I DO NOT really want to ruin anything since I am renting. This is on a lower level so I do not have access to boards beneath the house. Thanks
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 8:18:13 AM EDT
btt
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 8:45:57 AM EDT
Roberts, Some comments: - I wouldn't (if it were me) try to go through the tile, I'd be afraid of breaking it while either drilling it or putting the safe on it, then torquing the anchor bolts down. - I'd go through the carpet, since the holes may not be even noticable after you remove the safe and move it into your new house (you are buying a house someday, I hope!). - To drill in concrete, you'll need anchor bolts, a masonry drill bit the same size as the bolt and a hammer drill. A regular drill motor will work, but will take much longer and will probably burn up your drill bit (a regular drill bit will not work). Try not to break into the other side of the concrete, especially if you have a high water table. I hope this helps. Merlin
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 8:46:43 AM EDT
Depending on the thickness/Density of the safe base, I would suggest placing four .5" wedge fasteners through the interior base of the safe. If the carpet can be removed (It's in a closet) and reseamed with carpet tape when you move it would probably look much better than having 4 holes in it when you remove the safe. To do it and get the holes to line up correctly either bore through the bottom of the safe and mark corresponding holes on the concrete or make a pattern the size of the base and mark holes on the floor and mark on exterior base of the safe. I would suggest the wedge fasterners be at least long enough to penetrate 2" into the concrete. Most concrete floors are only 4" thick. Also make sure u use a masonry bit and a hammer drill for concrete. My .02 [beer]
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 8:49:51 AM EDT
Well other than something like a redhead that involves drilling your screwed.If you could find tile like you have(before you drill) go ahead and do that.Is the maintnance man a shooter?(complex)Or maybe you dont want him to know.If you dont know someone to replace the tile you could spend 50-75 bucks and pay someone to do it.Cheaper than your deductable.How about the wall?you could fix the drywall or plaster yourself and they probally would repaint anyway.not as secure as the floor though.If its a hobart type safe fasten for shure if its heaver how about a bunch of lead shot in the bottom
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 9:38:51 AM EDT
I'll most like be using a 17volt drill, and I'll see how that works. I'm going to call around about renting a hammer/drill first. Can I pick these anchors up at a Home Depot? Thanks for the input.
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 10:18:27 AM EDT
roberts- I am a locksmith and i doo this kind of thing on a weekly basis. First of all Merlin is right about the hammer drill it is a must. Also what u want is "LAG BOLTS" and large washers. Be sure not to let the drill wobble and widen the holes out to much. Anyway good luck and Email me if you have any questions.. Mike
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 1:09:05 PM EDT
I agree with the others on a roto-hammer and red head type anchores. If your concrete is not very deep or in poor condition epoxy anchores are another option. This requires drilling an over sized hole in the concrete installing a two part epoxy in the hole and installing a threaded rod in it. The epoxy and hardware will be located in the Simpson Strong Tie section of any good building store. Good luck.
Link Posted: 3/5/2001 5:01:04 PM EDT
roberts, You might try putting the safe in a corner then drilling through the back and side into the wall studs. Much easier to patch. Much harder to steal/move when anchored from two sides instead of just the bottom.
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