Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 10/14/2004 9:27:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 9:30:18 AM EST by FanoftheBlackRifle]
Assuming no budget limitations, what is the best CAD/CAM/CAE package and why?

If you pick "Other" please name it below
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:33:06 AM EST
It depends on your application. I picked othere because there are some different things depending what your specific use is. If it is electrical then use a program called E-Plan. Or you can use PromisE or ACADE. So please specify what you need it for.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:34:39 AM EST
I use Auto-Cadd 10 hours a day every day for 20 years it is the best cadd software bar none
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:35:35 AM EST
Give me AutoCAD
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:36:57 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:37:32 AM EST
AutoCAD is a toy

Pro/ENGINEER, Unigraphics, and Catia are far superior.

Heck, even Inventor is better than AutoCAD...

I have a preference for Pro/E myself.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:38:10 AM EST
Depends on what you are going to do with it...
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:39:10 AM EST
... Without peer - UniGraphics (NX2)

www.ugs.com/index.shtml
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:41:16 AM EST

It really depends on your application. What are you trying to achieve? Sheet metal, Die Design etc????

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 9:41:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 9:45:13 AM EST by Samuel]
Autocad probably has the best support out of the mentioned above. Most high end engineering outfits use it as well, so that speaks for itself.
We use TekSoft here but that is because we get it free. It works pretty good but the functions are branched too deep so you cannot visually find quick edits/key and such as fast.

We use it mainly for CNC. Like mentioned above it depends on what you need it for.


Samuel
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 10:08:33 AM EST
AutoCad is popular because it is what everyone has been trained on for the last twenty+ years and are resistant to/fear change. Once they get some training on systms such as Pro-E or SolidWorks, their preferences usually change as well.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 10:14:49 AM EST
well i voted for solid works since i use that and Pro/E for my mechanical engineering classes. It depends on what you're going to do however. I used AutoCad for 4 years before college so I could map floor plans and that was really easy, don't think it is the "best" for non 3d design, but it was really simple.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 10:20:29 AM EST
AutoCAD for me!
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 10:21:32 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:46:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 12:50:32 PM EST by FanoftheBlackRifle]
Just trying to get idea of what people think is the best. I was thinking more along the lines of individual part design as well as assembly design.


Personally, I hate autocad because its ability to work with surfaces and solids SUCKS. Great for floor plans and stuff like that, but horrible at part and assembly design (disclaimer -- last I used autocad was R14; this may have changed since then).


I've used autocad, Unigraphics, Pro/E, solid edge, solid works, and I-Deas. University doesn't have (as far as I know) any labs with Catia V5 so I haven't messed with that. I-Deas and unigraphics are about on the same level as far as capability (from what I can tell), with pro/e and solidworks right behind, then solid edge, and trailing far behind, autocad.

The unigraphics / I-Deas debate will probably come down to chevy v ford, since unigraphics was designed for GM and I-Deas was adopted by ford....they're both owned by EDS now and as far as I can tell, they're both very capable for solids and surfaces.


(ok, unigraphics and i-deas WERE both owned by EDS at one point...or the companies were eventually owned by the same company, or something along those lines......dunno if thats still the case)
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:49:22 PM EST
Unigraphics.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:52:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 12:57:06 PM EST by wedge1082]
AutoCad all the way.

eta - I have used AutoCad everyday for almost 10 years.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 12:58:55 PM EST

AutoCAD really shouldn't be in the list. It's not as capable as the other products. Mainly, because it's old technology. It deals primarily with 2D and 3D wireframe drawings. If you want 3D modeling and surfacing capablity from AutoDesk (makers of AutoCAD) they have created Inventor. It competes directly with these other packages.

Unigraphics is no longer owned by EDS. They were sold and now exist as Unigraphics Solutions. IDEAS was made by SDRC who sold the product to PTC, who are the maker's of Pro Engineer.

I encounter Solid Works and Inventor the most in my industry. I think mainly because of the price. The CATIA and UG products are very expensive with step learning curves. Pro E is a little less expensive, but had a step learning curve as well. Solid Works, Solid Edge and Inventor are all in the 5K range.

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:04:16 PM EST
We use AutoCad here at work to "draw pictures".
We use Solid Works to do all of our mechanical designs, it has one the best 3D rendering I've ever seen.
We also import/export DXF formats from our CadStar schematic capture program to Solid Works so the board outlines are actually what the mechanical design is.

I'm not saying AutoCad is not a good program - it's excellent for what we use it for - but Solid Works definitely is the superior program if you are going to be doing mechanical designs.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:06:48 PM EST
Solidworks- dollar for dollar- day by day.

Designing factory automation.

I totally detest Solid Edge.

Autocad is a good sketcher.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:15:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By wedge1082:
AutoCad all the way.

eta - I have used AutoCad everyday for almost 10 years.




Ditto. BUT like anything it has it's good points.

It's strong points are "2-D" Plans type of applications. Simple to use if thats what you mainly produce.

Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:17:16 PM EST
Solidworks
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:24:29 PM EST
Apples and Oranges here folks. Vanilla AutoCAD is fine for 2D stuff but is nothing more than a nightmare for anything in 3-D.

You would never use PRO-E to draw up a basic house plan and you really should not use AutoCAD to do 3D pipe layouts.

And I use AutoCAD 10 hrs a day also.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 1:25:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
Assuming no budget limitations, what is the best CAD/CAM/CAE package and why?

If you pick "Other" please name it below



AutoCAD


Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle:
Assuming no budget limitations, what is the best CAD/CAM/CAE package and why?

If you pick "Other" please name it below



Anything other than AutoCAD
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:21:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 2:23:05 PM EST by jvic]
My top 2 choices aren't even listed. I would call the listed ones midrange systems. CATIA and Unigraphics are tops. I pick Unigraphics. (I am a Unigraphics designer ). I Have used or worked with people using SolidEdge, SolidWorks, AutoCAD, Mechanical Desktop, CATIA, CADDS, VersaCAD, Formtek Raster.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:27:13 PM EST
I use autocad for quick 2D sketches and Solid Edge for more formal 3D parts and assemblies. Out in the shop our CAM software is Gibbs.

--RR
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:30:19 PM EST

Real engineers don't use Autocad.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 2:34:15 PM EST
I use autocad and like it, but a friend recommends that I demo Solid Works. I'll try it.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 6:35:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/14/2004 6:36:16 PM EST by NoHarmNoFAL-01]

Originally Posted By Alacran:
Real engineers don't use Autocad.



Then real engineers shouldn't draft

If you do it by hand, your doing something wrong.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 6:44:15 PM EST
Solidworks.


IDEAS is great, but not as well integrated.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 6:44:54 PM EST
I've been learning ProE and we just got Wildfire 2.0 (the updated version of ProE) and its very powerfull software. I'm gonna be a machinist so the 3D modeling and assembly parts of ProE are very nice. I will be learning some MasterCam too. From what I've looked at ProE/Wildfire is capable of doing some CNC related drafting too? Is anyone familiar with this side of the software (Manufactorying/Expert Machnist)? I monkyed around with it the other day but without a book I didn't get very far but I did see a lot of options that geared directly toward machining. Oh and can any recommend some good basic books on the newer Wildfire 2.0? I bought the student version of it so I have my own to play around with but it is different from the ProE we have at school in some ways(which my teacher knows lots about but still is figuring out the Wildfire).
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 6:59:21 PM EST
We use Pro Engineer at uni and the fucking POS keeps crashing or stuffing up!

Was particularly annoying during one of our CAD assessments, when it crashed for many people during their test and the fuckin lecturer, who is a grumpy bastard, didnt believe most of them so they got 0 for their mark..
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 7:38:20 PM EST
If you want to do real ME design work, it's all about ProE. ACad is still required for quick sketches and layouts, though.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 8:24:46 PM EST
Having used CAD systems from way back when, including CADAM (all versions), Pro-CADAM, Autocad, Pro-E, I-Deas (all versions), SolidEdge, Unigraphics (all versions), Solidworks, CATIA, Euclid and Inventor I believe I'm qualified to say that all of them have their uses in different engineering environments. A lot depends upon the CAD requirements and skill level of the user. I am a firm believer in using CAD for all phases of product implementation including conceptual design, analysis, detail design, manufacturing, assembly, test and troubleshooting. That said, the two software packages that have end-to-end seamless functionality are I-Deas and Unigraphics. Others such as Autocad, Solidworks and even Pro-E have connectivity to other modules to perform the some of the functions mentioned earlier, but none have the complete package. Once I-Deas is completely merged with Unigraphics NX, that software should dominate the high end-market. I would have to give Solidworks the nod in the next tier, with SolidEdge leading the pack in the lower tier.

CW
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 8:46:05 PM EST

Originally Posted By mh454:
I've been learning ProE and we just got Wildfire 2.0 (the updated version of ProE) and its very powerfull software. I'm gonna be a machinist so the 3D modeling and assembly parts of ProE are very nice. I will be learning some MasterCam too. From what I've looked at ProE/Wildfire is capable of doing some CNC related drafting too? Is anyone familiar with this side of the software (Manufactorying/Expert Machnist)? I monkyed around with it the other day but without a book I didn't get very far but I did see a lot of options that geared directly toward machining. Oh and can any recommend some good basic books on the newer Wildfire 2.0? I bought the student version of it so I have my own to play around with but it is different from the ProE we have at school in some ways(which my teacher knows lots about but still is figuring out the Wildfire).



I've used ProE's CNC package a bit when I was a student lab instructor at our school's engineering lab for manufacturing. I could answer any questions you might have (at least I can try).

After using ProE, Autocad, Cadkey, I-Deas, Solid Works and Solid Edge... I have to say that Solid Edge is the best I've used so far.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 8:46:58 PM EST
i am certified in Auto cad, so that is what i chose. don't know about any of the other ones.
Link Posted: 10/14/2004 8:59:17 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/15/2004 3:17:28 AM EST
Microstation!
I was raised on Autocad, but had issues with the 3D capabilities. Keep in mind, we were doing 3D mechanical piping and ductwork designs. We switched to Microstation which has a very superior 3D engine.
Microstation is so easy to use. Our employees say" Once you use Microstation, you will never use Autocad again" .
This is not a solids package or designed for true engineering work.
Doug
Link Posted: 10/15/2004 3:32:10 AM EST
I don't really care about the 3-d aspects of drawing, because in my field it would be a waste of time. I deal with the mechanical engineering side of commercial construction, spending time to draw my plans in 3-d would not only waste my time, but the contractors would never even look at them. So for me AutoCad is the best.

PS – And we are real engineers.
Link Posted: 10/15/2004 3:40:47 AM EST
Some of the programs that you are comparing are really not just drafting software. ProE, Soldi Works, etc. are more. For purely drafting with the ability to adapt to several industries AutoCAD and Microstation are hard to beat. In the manufacturing or maechanical industries Catia is very good. If you are looking for a drafting, design, and detailing software in the building industry look no further than SDS software (very expensive).

So my answer is also it depends on the application and what you want the software to do.
Link Posted: 10/15/2004 4:12:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/15/2004 4:13:28 AM EST by dkdragon]
My vote is for solid edge. You just can't beat it for large assemblies and sheet metal design.
Link Posted: 10/15/2004 4:23:38 AM EST
We use TurboCad at our company. Its cheap, but gets the job done for the structures that we design.
Link Posted: 10/15/2004 11:08:09 AM EST
<rant>

Personally, I can't see why ANYBODY with an unlimited budget would buy Autocad. It is decidedly inferior to most other CAD utilities. As has been stated, it's 3D capabilities suck; so much so, that they're damn near non-existant. Yes, it is easy to use, that's why most high schools and community colleges teach with it. Doing so, however, they are doing their students a great disservice. Autocad just won't cut it anymore in most applications. It's fine for simple archetecture and other 2D applications. But when I need to model a part, I'm REALLY glad i have other stuff than Autocad.

</rant>
Top Top