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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 4/6/2006 1:31:21 PM EDT
BAE Systems’ Precision Mortar Seeker Survives Gun-Level Shock Test
(Source: BAE Systems; issued April 5, 2006)



NASHUA, N.H. --- BAE Systems has successfully completed initial 120mm mortar weapon-level launch shock tests of its semi-active laser seeker for the U.S. Army's XM395 Precision Guided Mortar Munition (PGMM) cartridge. The seeker met all test objectives and maintained accuracy during an evaluation at Alliant Techsystems' (ATK) rail gun test facility in Elk River, Minn.

The milestone success opens the way to the program's next phase -- guided flight demonstrations scheduled for this spring.

"This successful rail gun test is a key stepping-out point for the PGMM program," said Dave Rathe, ATK program manager for PGMM. "The team is pleased with BAE Systems' accomplishments to date, and we continue to be impressed by the capability of the semi-active laser seeker. The ATK-led team is confident in our readiness to start the first phase of the PGMM flight test program."

BAE Systems is partnered with ATK on the PGMM program, an advanced weapon system that offers soldiers a precise, multipurpose indirect fire capability. The nose-mounted seeker is one of several components in the PGMM cartridge. The ATK-led program is currently in system design and development, with production expected to begin in late 2008.

"This was an extremely stressful test on the hardware," said Kim Cadorette, BAE Systems' PGMM program manager. "The seeker passed the test without degradation. We are continuing with production and look forward to the upcoming seeker and mortar-round guided flight tests."

The semi-active laser seeker uses BAE Systems' Distributed Aperture Semi-Active Laser Seeker technology, which has exceptionally high sensitivity coupled with accurate angle accuracy over a large field of view. ATK and the U.S. Army have planned extensive testing to ensure that the first PGMM production rounds will be ready for delivery by 2010.


Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:11:55 PM EDT
So....what does this thing do? Is it just a laser guided morter bomb?
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:20:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By enemy:
So....what does this thing do? Is it just a laser guided morter bomb?



Yes, precision mortar fire. Nice way of dealing with small problems and not having to wait for Air or if you don't have arty assets neither.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:24:05 PM EDT



Should work good with this
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 4:13:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TIMMAH: Should work good with this www.generaldynamics.com/images/home/mortar_carrier.jpg
Just imagine the possibilities! A UAV with a laser pointer will allow an armored column to shoot large mortar rounds at targets behind hills and buildings that they can't see at eye level. Every attack will be a Thunder Run and the bad guys are going to get ragged trying to keep up with the pace.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 8:58:26 PM EDT
sweeeeeeeet.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:02:54 PM EDT
Somebody still has to paint the target.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:13:49 PM EDT
That's pretty awesome. I could see this having some anti-armor applications.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:33:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
Somebody still has to paint the target.




Link Posted: 4/6/2006 10:07:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 10:09:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Interested in the internals/function. What is that yellow thing? The control surfaces?



The yellow tabs contain propellant.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 10:10:26 PM EDT
propellant
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 10:12:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Interested in the internals/function. What is that yellow thing? The control surfaces?



The yellow tabs contain propellant.



Yep. The gunners clap a ring on to add a few 100 meters or so, or take them off to subtract a few meters of range. They have it all worked out fairly exactly.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 3:15:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Interested in the internals/function. What is that yellow thing? The control surfaces?



The yellow tabs contain propellant.




Sometimes called "cheese charges".... and I've seen people take pieces of the things and suck on them. but anyway....
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 3:47:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjw:

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Interested in the internals/function. What is that yellow thing? The control surfaces?



The yellow tabs contain propellant.




Sometimes called "cheese charges".... and I've seen people take pieces of the things and suck on them. but anyway....



so the propellant charges are placed ahead of the fins? why doesn't that just blow the fins off?
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:03:32 AM EDT
It's 'Copperhead for the 11-series'...

I'm just waiting for some light-infantry advocate to get up & say the Army doesn't need artillery now (just like we don't 'need' tanks, or anything that can't fit in a C-130 ).... Someone's gonna do it - just you watch....
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 4:20:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MudBug:

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
Somebody still has to paint the target.




www.stasys.co.uk/images/common/uav_predator.jpg




Good plan. I'll put you in charge and I'll go back and carry up some more mortars.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 10:27:02 AM EDT
Don't the British have something similar (or were attempting to field) a system like this that they
referred to as "Merlin"?
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 10:35:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By curt:

Originally Posted By mjw:

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Interested in the internals/function. What is that yellow thing? The control surfaces?



The yellow tabs contain propellant.




Sometimes called "cheese charges".... and I've seen people take pieces of the things and suck on them. but anyway....



so the propellant charges are placed ahead of the fins? why doesn't that just blow the fins off?



The fin section is VERY STOUT on mortar projectiles, you could pound nails with them.

Also you have to realize, when the propellant burns, the very hot gases expand in all directions not just the tail. Because there is a seal at the rotating band and the end of the tube gives the path of least resistance, the mortar projectile will be pushed out quickly from the tube by the expanding gases.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 10:50:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tanker06:
Don't the British have something similar (or were attempting to field) a system like this that they
referred to as "Merlin"?



IIRC, it was supposed to be an antiarmor round that would home in on the magnetic/IR signature of a tank for a top armor kill.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 11:17:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mjw:

Originally Posted By eodtech2000:

Originally Posted By -brass-:
Interested in the internals/function. What is that yellow thing? The control surfaces?



The yellow tabs contain propellant.




Sometimes called "cheese charges".... and I've seen people take pieces of the things and suck on them. but anyway....



The cheese charges were only on the 4.2" (four-deuce; aka 107mm) mortar. Yes you could nibble on the end for a quickie rush since they were made from nitroglycerin. My platoon switched from 4.2" mortars to the Soltam 120s in 1996. Dramatic improvement.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 6:50:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 6:51:28 PM EDT by mjw]

Originally Posted By bcw107:
The cheese charges were only on the 4.2" (four-deuce; aka 107mm) mortar. Yes you could nibble on the end for a quickie rush since they were made from nitroglycerin. My platoon switched from 4.2" mortars to the Soltam 120s in 1996. Dramatic improvement.



Ah... didn't realize that. My only experience with mortars was with the four-deuce. That is when I was in the NG in the early 90s. Prior to that, when I was active, we had 60mm mortars at the company level, but I did the anti-armor thing for the most part at that time.

Back to the anti-armor application though... Back in '87, I was part of a group conducting tests on the Milan anti-tank weapon. The Army was considering the Milan, as well as a couple of other contenders, as an interim replacement for the Dragon. An engineering branch captain in charge of the testing told us a anti-armor mortar round guided via fiber optics, but I never heard anything more. I had a hard time imagining all that fiber optic cable, if I understood the system correctly, strewn all over a range or battle field. Then again, a lot of wire can be strewn about, too.
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