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Posted: 4/23/2016 2:03:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 2:04:46 AM EDT by Mah_lee]
Those who speak English as their primary language....do you ever need to turn on the subtitles of movies to keep track of the dialogue? Movies that are, ostensibly, in the english language, but not your personal dialect.

I think at least half of the problem is audio mixing in movies. Toss in a dvd, turn it up to hear...and any loud scenes or explosions make you wish you had tinnitus.

For example, I need subtitles for some British, and nearly all Irish films. Learn to speak American, thanks.

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:05:56 AM EDT
Nope... Guess you just need to travel more...
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:16:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Mah_lee:
Those who speak English as their primary language....do you ever need to turn on the subtitles of movies to keep track of the dialogue? Movies that are, ostensibly, in the english language, but not your personal dialect.

I think at least half of the problem is audio mixing in movies. Toss in a dvd, turn it up to hear...and any loud scenes or explosions make you wish you had tinnitus.

For example, I need subtitles for some British, and nearly all Irish films. Learn to speak American, thanks.

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I do just for the hell of it. And just to see what the person does for the CC. I do it for all movies not just ones made in the US. You catch shit on the CC that you don't hear. Doesn't matter the movie or show!
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:17:11 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By madmacs69:


Nope... Guess you just need to travel more...
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Pretty much this.



As an engineer, I've never had trouble with just about any english accent due to lots of exposure. You haven't lived until you've heard a 3 way argument between a South African, an Indian, and a Scot in an American classroom
 
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:22:06 AM EDT
Yep!

It's a sound mixing thing with Brit films. Not all of them, but most are horribly mixed, with background being as prominent as speech, and some Brit speech patterns causing consonants getting lost in the wash. Watch the BBC and it's a non issue, because the mic is dedicated to only the speech.

Some Brit actors, like the dude on the modern Sherlock Holmes series with Lucy Liu, and the dude from the old "Lies" series, are horrible about it, even in American productions.
Soft toned and rapid Brit, is hard to pick up, unless the volume is cranked, and then everything is too damn loud. The same actors in different productions, are clear as a bell.

I spent over a year with an HMRM detachment, and never had an issue with language...except with a couple Scotts, but even they can't understand each other half the damn time.
It's not just the "Seperated by a common language" thing.

The thing that stands out, is the Brit chicks lines, are NEVER lost to the back ground sound.
It's a definitely a Mixing issue.




Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:39:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 2:44:34 AM EDT by Mah_lee]
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Originally Posted By Kanati:

Pretty much this.

As an engineer, I've never had trouble with just about any english accent due to lots of exposure. You haven't lived until you've heard a 3 way argument between a South African, an Indian, and a Scot in an American classroom


 
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Originally Posted By Kanati:
Originally Posted By madmacs69:
Nope... Guess you just need to travel more...

Pretty much this.

As an engineer, I've never had trouble with just about any english accent due to lots of exposure. You haven't lived until you've heard a 3 way argument between a South African, an Indian, and a Scot in an American classroom


 


I've had arguments with hungarians, poles, israelis, germans, italians, turks, and maybe a few others, in english. In real life, it is much easier to fill the gaps. I'm talking about movies, where it can simultaneously be too loud and too quiet.

ETA: Never thought I would have an engineer try to tell me about how to communicate
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:41:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By S-28:
Yep!

It's a sound mixing thing with Brit films. Not all of them, but most are horribly mixed, with background being as prominent as speech, and some Brit speech patterns causing consonants getting lost in the wash. Watch the BBC and it's a non issue, because the mic is dedicated to only the speech.

Some Brit actors, like the dude on the modern Sherlock Holmes series with Lucy Liu, and the dude from the old "Lies" series, are horrible about it, even in American productions.
Soft toned and rapid Brit, is hard to pick up, unless the volume is cranked, and then everything is too damn loud. The same actors in different productions, are clear as a bell.

I spent over a year with an HMRM detachment, and never had an issue with language...except with a couple Scotts, but even they can't understand each other half the damn time.
It's not just the "Seperated by a common language" thing.

The thing that stands out, is the Brit chicks lines, are NEVER lost to the back ground sound.
It's a definitely a Mixing issue.




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THIS is what I'm talking about. I'll do some light research on it tomorrow. Danke!
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 2:58:45 AM EDT
Nigel!  Bruce! - buncha poofters ya lot!
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 3:04:43 AM EDT
Yes, when Welshies talk.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 3:11:05 AM EDT
Only one I struggle with is Matthew McConaughey.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 3:25:30 AM EDT
I watch all movies with subtitles because linguistics is my hobby, and I find the variations in grammatical patterns between written and spoken language interesting.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 4:18:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 4:21:00 AM EDT by Patriot328]
only one that really came to mind. Though it's an American doing it and it's supposed to be unintelligible, I have run across a few that sound like it


Link Posted: 4/23/2016 4:26:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 4:27:53 AM EDT by Fulminata]
Never had that problem, my great-grandma was born in Glasgow and used to babysit me when I was a wee lad so I learned how Scottish people spoke from the get go, I used to have to translate what she was saying for her neighbors when she was "in a mood" even though she was (ostensibly) speaking English, it was seriously a lot like the farm scene in Hot Fuzz. Believe me, if you can follow a pissed off Glaswegian octogenarian then every other UK accent is a cakewalk.



One of my longtime best friends is from South Africa, so I can swear in Afrikaans and do a decent Boer accent, which I'm told isn't easy for Americans to pull off. My brain is just wired weird maybe but there isn't any accent in English I can't follow, and most of them I can pull off if I'm "in a mood" of my own.  




 
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:00:17 AM EDT
I do, especially for the action movies, but rarely for Scottish or English, occasionally for Australian, New Zealand, and almost always for Indian, extremely Southern US, that bastardization peculiar to Boston and those filthy Irish.

I don't even bother trying for Welsh or Newfie
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:05:12 AM EDT
Australia is my only issue but it's more about trying to understand why EVERYTHING has a slang term then understanding the few bits of English they say in between.

You can't just cut a word in half and toss in an "O" and expect us to understand.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:06:29 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By TacticalPenguin:
I do, especially for the action movies, but rarely for Scottish or English, occasionally for Australian, New Zealand, and almost always for Indian, extremely Southern US, that bastardization peculiar to Boston and those filthy Irish.

I don't even bother trying for Welsh or Newfie
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I worked with a newfie for a few months in Africa. Aside from most of what he said sounding like he had food in his mouth, he was completely bonkers.

Interesting dude
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:08:35 AM EDT
Not really for movies. I do use subtitles in many videogames, but that's because there are often other things competing for my attention than just the dialogue.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:10:03 AM EDT
I speak the most boring American English, so no one can place what part of the world I grew up in.

Know that a "yob" is the same as a "boyyo"...

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:11:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 5:13:01 AM EDT by Pesty]
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Originally Posted By Fulminata:
Never had that problem, my great-grandma was born in Glasgow and used to babysit me when I was a wee lad so I learned how Scottish people spoke from the get go, I used to have to translate what she was saying for her neighbors when she was "in a mood" even though she was (ostensibly) speaking English, it was seriously a lot like the farm scene in Hot Fuzz. Believe me, if you can follow a pissed off Glaswegian octogenarian then every other UK accent is a cakewalk.

One of my longtime best friends is from South Africa, so I can swear in Afrikaans and do a decent Boer accent, which I'm told isn't easy for Americans to pull off. My brain is just wired weird maybe but there isn't any accent in English I can't follow, and most of them I can pull off if I'm "in a mood" of my own.  
 
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Have you heard a strong Geordy accent? I don't even try it's not even close to anything resembling language. Talking with a neighbour the other day I didn't even get the gist of it. Every now and then he'd say yeee knaaaawww man and I'd just nod, Eventually he walked off. That's real,life not movies. I'm ok with movies.

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 5:55:20 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By Pesty:
Have you heard a strong Geordy accent? I don't even try it's not even close to anything resembling language. Talking with a neighbour the other day I didn't even get the gist of it. Every now and then he'd say yeee knaaaawww man and I'd just nod, Eventually he walked off. That's real,life not movies. I'm ok with movies.



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Originally Posted By Pesty:



Originally Posted By Fulminata:

Never had that problem, my great-grandma was born in Glasgow and used to babysit me when I was a wee lad so I learned how Scottish people spoke from the get go, I used to have to translate what she was saying for her neighbors when she was "in a mood" even though she was (ostensibly) speaking English, it was seriously a lot like the farm scene in Hot Fuzz. Believe me, if you can follow a pissed off Glaswegian octogenarian then every other UK accent is a cakewalk.



One of my longtime best friends is from South Africa, so I can swear in Afrikaans and do a decent Boer accent, which I'm told isn't easy for Americans to pull off. My brain is just wired weird maybe but there isn't any accent in English I can't follow, and most of them I can pull off if I'm "in a mood" of my own.  

 




Have you heard a strong Geordy accent? I don't even try it's not even close to anything resembling language. Talking with a neighbour the other day I didn't even get the gist of it. Every now and then he'd say yeee knaaaawww man and I'd just nod, Eventually he walked off. That's real,life not movies. I'm ok with movies.





Yeah I've heard that one before and that shit is just this side of incomprehensible, and it does take a lot of concentration for me to understand it, and half the slang is all context. Thankfully I don't have to very often, if I had a neighbor that spoke that I'd teach him something more civilized like Russian or Bantu or Klingon...pretty much anything. You're right that accent makes the traveler talk in Snatch sound like the most normal thing ever.



Oh and I thought of another one that gets me sometimes, and that's Cockney rhyming slang. But outside of movies and one really strange trip to London in the '90s I've really not been bothered about it, plus I think none of them understand what they're saying either, they just nod a lot and then come up with a pile of bullshit to try to "explain" what they're saying if it looks like you don't understand...while the other dudes he was talking with nod too and act like they knew what he was up to the whole time, even though they're relieved you asked because they're all thinking,"What the fuck is he on about?" Hmmm...kinda like Geordie.



 
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:01:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:02:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 6:04:12 AM EDT by Pesty]
yeah forgot about that nonsense,  Rhyming slang.

Also anything said in any of the wooorrrllll starrrr vid clips you guys  keep posting
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:06:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Mah_lee:
Those who speak English as their primary language....do you ever need to turn on the subtitles of movies to keep track of the dialogue? Movies that are, ostensibly, in the english language, but not your personal dialect.

I think at least half of the problem is audio mixing in movies. Toss in a dvd, turn it up to hear...and any loud scenes or explosions make you wish you had tinnitus.

For example, I need subtitles for some British, and nearly all Irish films. Learn to speak American, thanks.

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No matter what I do I can't hear a lot of shit in movies, sub titles are a must, or i'll be skipping back 10 sec every few min.  Hearing loss doesn't help.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:07:58 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Pesty:
yeah forgot about that nonsense,  Rhyming slang.

Also anything said in any of the wooorrrllll starrrr vid clips you guys  keep posting
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That's what happens when the dumbest people on the planet reproduce every 14 years and society celebrates them.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 6:41:38 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Kanati:

Pretty much this.

As an engineer, I've never had trouble with just about any english accent due to lots of exposure. You haven't lived until you've heard a 3 way argument between a South African, an Indian, and a Scot in an American classroom


 
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Originally Posted By Kanati:
Originally Posted By madmacs69:
Nope... Guess you just need to travel more...

Pretty much this.

As an engineer, I've never had trouble with just about any english accent due to lots of exposure. You haven't lived until you've heard a 3 way argument between a South African, an Indian, and a Scot in an American classroom


 



You've never spoken to any welshmen, then?
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 7:12:40 AM EDT
I don't understand half of what American modern actresses say when they use a fake low sexy voice. I stop, rewind, turn the volume up, play, and it still sounds like gibberish.  Sophia Bush of Chicago PD is one of the worst. I can't stand her since she started doing that. I cringe when I see her because I know I won't understand her.



Now if it is that British car reviewer, Rebecca Jackson, I can understand every word she says no matter how low, even if music and car sounds are interfering. It is her natural sexy voice and it is perfect.

Link Posted: 4/23/2016 7:16:20 AM EDT
Everyone here is raised watching US/UK TV and movies so theres no problem.



We only have problems with REALLY strong geordie? accents and REALLY strong midwestern? accents.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 7:23:41 AM EDT
We're brought up on American and Brit TV, so other English accents are perfectly normal. So much so that my kids are essentially accent-less. My daughter in particular pronounces her "r" like an American, but a lot of other sounds like a Brit. It comes from a steady diet of Thomas the Tank Engine (Brit version), Octonauts and Dinosaur Train.

I struggle with Scots and some Indians, but generally its all good.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 7:24:49 AM EDT
Cockney escapes my lexicon.  I'm impressed by those who can decipher it.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 7:43:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 7:46:51 AM EDT by broadrunarms]
Bollocks.

I had English and Welsh teachers in school and I understand English. T'wernt 'til I was in America that I had problem.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 7:47:59 AM EDT
My experience is limited to TV. They mumble. sometimes their speech is a local dialect, then I may miss the words too.
On Downton Abbey this was rarely or never an issue; I miss about1/3 of Elementry.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:14:37 AM EDT
One of the best war films I've seen in years is Kajaki, which to my mind was every bit as tense as Black Hawk Down. But I gotta say, trying to understand the conversation going on among that group was more than a bit trying at times.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:18:06 AM EDT
I worked with a Scottish guy in Afghanistan, took me about two weeks before I could figure out WTF he was saying.  After 10 years working with Brits, Irish and South Africans I can now understand 90% of what they say.



Lots of slang words and phrases are hard for Americans to understand.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:25:10 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Fulminata:
Never had that problem, my great-grandma was born in Glasgow and used to babysit me when I was a wee lad so I learned how Scottish people spoke from the get go, I used to have to translate what she was saying for her neighbors when she was "in a mood" even though she was (ostensibly) speaking English, it was seriously a lot like the farm scene in Hot Fuzz. Believe me, if you can follow a pissed off Glaswegian octogenarian then every other UK accent is a cakewalk.

One of my longtime best friends is from South Africa, so I can swear in Afrikaans and do a decent Boer accent, which I'm told isn't easy for Americans to pull off. My brain is just wired weird maybe but there isn't any accent in English I can't follow, and most of them I can pull off if I'm "in a mood" of my own.  
 
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Allow me to endorse my British grandfather's use of Germanic town names as expletives.

Wuppertal! Schalksmühle! Niederkrüchten!!!

They lose their effect when the audience is familiar with Teutonic geography, but the rest of the world seems to instinctively understand that they don't want to be known as whatever you just said.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:58:05 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Tomtbo:

Know that a "yob" is the same as a "boyyo"...

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Not really...
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:01:30 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bradders:


It's Geordie!
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Originally Posted By Bradders:
Originally Posted By Pesty:
Originally Posted By Fulminata:
Never had that problem, my great-grandma was born in Glasgow and used to babysit me when I was a wee lad so I learned how Scottish people spoke from the get go, I used to have to translate what she was saying for her neighbors when she was "in a mood" even though she was (ostensibly) speaking English, it was seriously a lot like the farm scene in Hot Fuzz. Believe me, if you can follow a pissed off Glaswegian octogenarian then every other UK accent is a cakewalk.

One of my longtime best friends is from South Africa, so I can swear in Afrikaans and do a decent Boer accent, which I'm told isn't easy for Americans to pull off. My brain is just wired weird maybe but there isn't any accent in English I can't follow, and most of them I can pull off if I'm "in a mood" of my own.  
 


Have you heard a strong Geordy accent? I don't even try it's not even close to anything resembling language. Talking with a neighbour the other day I didn't even get the gist of it. Every now and then he'd say yeee knaaaawww man and I'd just nod, Eventually he walked off. That's real,life not movies. I'm ok with movies.



It's Geordie!


That sounded awfully defensive... We shouldnt call you a scouse git Im assuming?
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:16:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 10:18:24 AM EDT by Bradders]
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:16:31 AM EDT
I have to listen very closely to Mrs. Brown's Boys, or I have no idea what they are saying for the first five minutes or so.

After that, I just have to pay attention.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:20:40 AM EDT
No,other than occasionally it takes 2 listens to catch all of what Guy Martin is saying.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:07:06 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By Pesty:





Also anything said in any of the wooorrrllll starrrr vid clips you guys  keep posting
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We don't understand most of that either. (Nice dog, btw.)
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