Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 9/28/2004 12:39:02 PM EST
Of shooting a dog? My blood is boiling right now, so pardon me if I use expletives excessively.

I took the kids outside just now (they are 4 years old and 14 months old). We are minding our own business when this dumbshit dog (not as dumb as his owner) comes darting accross the road straight for the baby snarling and barking the whole way. I snatched the baby up in my arms and my 4 year old leapt onto the electric box thingy, both of them crying at this point. This little mutt was all of 20 pounds, and some sort of half-breed terrier, but very vicious. He didn't want to tangle with me, so he stayed just beyond kicking distance snarling at the baby I was holding. If the little fucker had come 6 inches closer, he would be on the neighbor's roof right now. What makes this 100 times worse, is that his owner was standing 3 houses down watching the whole thing while chatting with a friend. When I said to get her dog, she whistled once, and the dog didn't even respond. We have leash laws, and even stricter rules in the neighborhood, but they are never enforced. I've dealt with animal control before, and they basically refuse to do anything unless the animal has allready torn a limb off somebody. If I had had a gun on me, the dog would be splattered all over my yard. I don't have a CCW yet, but open carry is legal in GA, so I am thinking of slapping on geekdude's shoulder holster next time I go out. If the neighbor wants to stand there and watch her dog threaten my kids, she can watch me put a bullet in his head.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:42:30 PM EST
Depends state 2 stae, county 2 county.

Call the cops and start a paper trail. That way when you do shoot it, you have a background of visciousness documented and also can show a lack of .gov action.



Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:44:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/28/2004 12:44:32 PM EST by Gungho_1989]
I know here, if a dog attacks you, you have the right to shoot it.
We have the same problems with Animal Control here, they never want to do anything, even when dogs in question aren't wanted by their owners.
Keep the gun on you, if he runs at you or the kids on your property in a threatening way again, I'd say shoot the bastage.
For the record, I really do love dogs.

Mrs gungho here.. I always forget to check after he's been on
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:44:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/28/2004 12:46:38 PM EST by wedge1082]
Give me an address.

Ops and I will take care of it.


eta- he is only 6.5 pounds, but it is pure muscle, and he hates mixed breeds.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:47:32 PM EST
I love dogs as well, but I love my kids more. The dog was a small dog, but big enough to seriously injure the baby, which is who he tried to attack. The little shit came under my car trying to get to the baby. If I had been 2 feet farther from him, the dog would have got there before I did, then I promise you the dog would be dead by my bare hands.

I'll call somewhere about the legality of shooting the bastage. He was wearing a collar, too, so animal control will definitely not do a damn thing.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:49:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By wedge1082:
Give me an address.

Ops and I will take care of it.
img23.exs.cx/img23/9688/ops01.jpg

eta- he is only 6.5 pounds, but it is pure muscle, and he hates mixed breeds.

Aww, that is a cutie! I'm sure he could take a toe off or something, though. I can see the power in his eyes.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:56:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By CavVet:
Depends state 2 stae, county 2 county.

Call the cops and start a paper trail. That way when you do shoot it, you have a background of visciousness documented and also can show a lack of .gov action.





+1 make sure that the cops talke to the owner so its in their report. There must be some kind of leash law they are violating. if you fear for your childs life,shoot to kill
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 12:56:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/28/2004 12:58:37 PM EST by wedge1082]

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:

Originally Posted By wedge1082:
Give me an address.

Ops and I will take care of it.
img23.exs.cx/img23/9688/ops01.jpg

eta- he is only 6.5 pounds, but it is pure muscle, and he hates mixed breeds.

Aww, that is a cutie! I'm sure he could take a toe off or something, though. I can see the power in his eyes.



We might bring little Ms. Wedge in on this one for sniper support.




So counting me this would be the team. Well Mrs. Wedge has to come too, because she provides the food for little Ms. Wedge.

Ok looks like it will be the entire Wedge family.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 1:15:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By wedge1082:

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:

Originally Posted By wedge1082:
Give me an address.

Ops and I will take care of it.
img23.exs.cx/img23/9688/ops01.jpg

eta- he is only 6.5 pounds, but it is pure muscle, and he hates mixed breeds.

Aww, that is a cutie! I'm sure he could take a toe off or something, though. I can see the power in his eyes.



We might bring little Ms. Wedge in on this one for sniper support.
img69.exs.cx/img69/2842/bell-ar01.jpg

img23.exs.cx/img23/3207/Op03.jpg

So counting me this would be the team. Well Mrs. Wedge has to come too, because she provides the food for little Ms. Wedge.

Ok looks like it will be the entire Wedge family.

That's quite a team you've got there. I'd say the little mongrel wouldn't stand a chance.

I called animal control, but they are out right now, and I would feel foolish calling the sherrif over a 20 pound mutt that has allready left the area.

I have some subsonic .22s I could use, and the neighbors wouldn't even hear the shot. I could use the wagon to haul him into the woods to a waiting shallow grave before the owner even noticed he stopped barking..... It wouldn't take much to lure him around the house for this, and the woods are close. The wagon's ready, just need to dig a hole.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 2:26:35 PM EST
I would just say to be ready next time the dog does that and then shoot the little basterd.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 4:08:38 PM EST
This does not answer your question about shooting the dog, but be sure to report the incidence.



Georgia's dog bite statute
Ga. Code Ann. sec. 51-2-7 provides:
A person who owns or keeps a vicious or dangerous animal of any kind and who, by careless management or by allowing the animal to go at liberty, causes injury to another person who does not provoke the injury by his own act may be liable in damages to the person so injured. In proving vicious propensity, it shall be sufficient to show that the animal was required to be at heel or on a leash by an ordinance of a city, county, or consolidated government, and the said animal was at the time of the occurrence not at heel or on a leash. The foregoing sentence shall not apply to domesticated fowl including roosters with spurs. The foregoing sentence shall not apply to domesticated livestock.
In cases where the dog ran loose in violation of a leash law, the circular wording of the statute results in strict liability on the part of the owner or keeper. In other cases, the statute essentially codifies the "one-bite" rule, with some narrow exceptions that favor the victim in certain circumstances.
The "one-bite" rule (also called the "first bite" rule) is the ancient, judge-made principle that an animal owner, including a dog owner, cannot be held liable for injuries caused by his animal unless the owner was aware that the animal had a dangerous propensity to cause such injuries. "Georgia has traditionally adhered to the "first bite" rule, which holds dog owners liable for their animal's behavior only if an owner knows that a dog has the 'propensity to do the particular act [biting] which caused injury to the complaining party.'" Clark v. Joiner, 242 Ga. App. 421. Therefore, to establish liability under the Georgia statute, the victim must prove that the dog owner knew or should have known of his dog's propensity to do the particular act which caused the complained of injury. Hamilton v. Walker, 235 Ga. App. 635 (510 S.E.2d 120) (1998); Durham v. Mooney, 234 Ga. App. 772, 773 (507 S.E.2d 877) (1998). If the particular act which caused injury was biting a human being, then there must be proof of a prior biting incident.

The Georgia courts have somewhat relaxed the "one-bite" rule, in that the victim can recover if he or she can prove that (a) the dog previously acted very aggressively toward people (i.e., an actual "bite" may not be required, and (b) the owner or keeper should have known that the dog might someday bite someone (as opposed to actually having knowledge of an actual, prior bite). In a case entitled Supan v. Griffin, 238 Ga. App. 404 (1999), a case involving a bite on the owner's premises, it was held that the true test of liability is the owner's "superior knowledge of his dog's temperament." The dog in that case had behaved in an aggressive manner and lunged toward a visitor to the owner's house. The visitor had to jump onto the owner's parked car in order to avoid being bitten. The owner knew this and scolded the dog. Nevertheless, the owner did not anticipate the subsequent attack on the victim, and did not warn the victim about the dog. (See also Thurmond v. Saffo, 238 Ga. App. 687, 688 (1999).) Despite the owner's claimed lack of belief in the dog's dangerous propensity, the court found liability under those facts.




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Liability can also be based on negligence
A dog bite victim can also base a claim on common law negligence principles. If the dog bite statute quoted above is not helpful, in other words, the victim may still have a remedy if negligence can be proved. For example, the victim might be able to prove that the dog owner's landlord was aware that the dog had a habit of biting people, but took no steps to protect visitors or pedestrians, despite having the opportunity and right to do so. (For more information, see Landlords' rights and liabilities. Also see the topic entitled Negligence in The Dog Bite Law Adviser.)


Link Posted: 9/28/2004 4:30:37 PM EST
CODE OF GEORGIA
TITLE 16. CRIMES AND OFFENSES
CHAPTER 12. OFFENSES AGAINST PUBLIC HEALTH AND MORALS
ARTICLE 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS
§ 16-12-4. Cruelty to animals

(a) As used in this Code section, the term:

(1) "Animal" shall not include any fish nor shall such term include any pest that might be exterminated or removed from a business, residence, or other structure.

(2) "Conviction" shall include pleas of guilty or nolo contendere or probation as a first offender pursuant to Article 3 of Chapter 8 of Title 42 and any conviction, plea of guilty or nolo contendere, or probation as a first offender for an offense under the laws of the United States or any of the several states that would constitute a violation of this Code section if committed in this state.

(3) "Willful neglect" means the intentional withholding of food and water required by an animal to prevent starvation or dehydration.


(b) A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals when he or she causes death or unjustifiable physical pain or suffering to any animal by an act, an omission, or willful neglect. Any person convicted of a violation of this subsection shall be guilty of a misdemeanor; provided, however, that:

(1) Any person who is convicted of a second or subsequent violation of this subsection shall be punished by imprisonment not to exceed 12 months, a fine not to exceed $5,000.00, or both; and

(2) Any person who is convicted of a second or subsequent violation of this subsection which results in the death of an animal shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature and shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than three months nor more than 12 months, a fine not to exceed $10,000.00, or both, which punishment shall not be suspended, probated, or withheld.


(c) A person commits the offense of aggravated cruelty to animals when he or she knowingly and maliciously causes death or physical harm to an animal by rendering a part of such animal's body useless or by seriously disfiguring such animal. A person convicted of the offense of aggravated cruelty to animals shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than five years, a fine not to exceed $15,000.00, or both, provided that any person who is convicted of a second or subsequent violation of this subsection shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than five years, a fine not to exceed the amount provided by Code Section 17-10-8, or both.

(d) Before sentencing a defendant for any conviction under this Code section, the sentencing judge may require psychological evaluation of the offender and shall consider the entire criminal record of the offender.

(e) The provisions of this Code section shall not be construed as prohibiting conduct which is otherwise permitted under the laws of this state or of the United States, including, but not limited to, agricultural, animal husbandry, butchering, food processing, marketing, scientific, research, medical, zoological, exhibition, competitive, hunting, trapping, fishing, wildlife management, or pest control practices or the authorized practice of veterinary medicine nor to limit in any way the authority or duty of the Department of Agriculture, Department of Natural Resources, any county board of health, any law enforcement officer, dog, animal, or rabies control officer, humane society, veterinarian, or private landowner protecting his or her property.

(f)(1) Nothing in this Code section shall be construed as prohibiting a person from:

(A) Defending his or her person or property, or the person or property of another, from injury or damage being caused by an animal; or

(B) Injuring or killing an animal reasonably believed to constitute a threat for injury or damage to any property, livestock, or poultry.

(2) The method used to injure or kill such animal shall be designed to be as humane as is possible under the circumstances. A person who humanely injures or kills an animal under the circumstances indicated in this subsection shall incur no civil or criminal liability for such injury or death.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 4:50:54 PM EST
Thanks, Ogre. I'll try to figure out who owns the dog (where they live and who is responsible), then I'll make sure that is reported as well. Irresponsible pet owners make me cranky.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 5:05:18 PM EST
My sister-in-law was attacked by a pitbull while running. It tore her sweatshirt nearly off. The only thing that saved her was the fact that she was wearing thick clothing. The police were called and the owners were fined and warned. She got a call the following week from the police that the dog was put down after attacking a second passer by. It is just stupid of the owners not to watch their dogs (especially after it attacks someone). I would report it if I were you. It is not fun to do things like that with a neighbor, but the next kid that dog goes after may not have a parent outside with them to get the situation under control. I am glad to hear your boys are alright.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 4:45:27 AM EST
Tell geekdude he needs to capture the dog next time it's in your yard, and carry it (by the scruff of its neck) to the owner's house, knock on the door, hand him the dog, and promise the owner that he'll kill the little furball next time it comes within a mile of your babies.

If necessary, keep the promise.

Meantime, file a report w/ animal control.

Also, conside moving to the country.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:36:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Tell geekdude he needs to capture the dog next time it's in your yard, and carry it (by the scruff of its neck) to the owner's house, knock on the door, hand him the dog, and promise the owner that he'll kill the little furball next time it comes within a mile of your babies.

If necessary, keep the promise.

Meantime, file a report w/ animal control.

Also, conside moving to the country.

The problem is, I don't know where the owner lives. If I did, I would pay her a visit. I'll try to find out today.

Moving to the country is the ultimate goal, but we have to save up for some land before that is possible.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 6:13:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 6:14:33 PM EST by cat_aclysm]
ETA this is geekdude.


Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Tell geekdude he needs to capture the dog next time it's in your yard, and carry it (by the scruff of its neck) to the owner's house, knock on the door, hand him the dog, and promise the owner that he'll kill the little furball next time it comes within a mile of your babies.

If necessary, keep the promise.

Meantime, file a report w/ animal control.

Also, conside moving to the country.




There will be no catch and release, only shoot and kill, or catch and choke. I wish I had been home, I could use practice on a moving target with deer season just around the corner Plus I got a new .357 mag that needs trying out and I could not think of a more appropriate way.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:47:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 7:49:44 PM EST by Tallbob]
Bet it would be fun to see how fast he moves after a shot of this...
www.selfdefenseproducts.com/pepperinfo.htm

I was told to get the Fox brand, 5million heat units, by a guy who has used it successfully on two and four legged problems.

Edit: For first try on the small dog. If that doesn't work, SSS.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 7:54:55 PM EST
Well this is good info I also have had problems with a dog that attacks and bites.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 8:26:50 PM EST
I was thinking pepper spray, also.
The good thing is, the dog would eventually return to its home, and hopefully get the pepper spray into the house and around the owner.
Imagine getting a strong whiff of that off your dog.
Believe me, it doesn't take much... I experimented with some in my younger, stupider days.
And you don't have to kill a dog (not that I'd feel remorse over protecting my family, I'd just feel bad for the dog for being punished for having a bad owner).
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 8:48:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By Tallbob:
Bet it would be fun to see how fast he moves after a shot of this...
www.selfdefenseproducts.com/pepperinfo.htm

I was told to get the Fox brand, 5million heat units, by a guy who has used it successfully on two and four legged problems.

Edit: For first try on the small dog. If that doesn't work, SSS.

The problem with that idea is that my 14 month old baby was in the area, and spraying that could get some on him, and I don't think it would take much to put the baby in the hospital. If the kids weren't out there when it happened, I would consider it.

Of course, problem #2 is that this animal's owners may also have children, and then the dog could take it home to them or an elderly person.... Too much room for hurting people.

Leisure_shoot, I feel like the dog has allready been punished for having a bad owner, and I doubt it will ever be fixed. I think it is merciful to kill it. If I owned a dog that charged a child, particularly a baby such as mine, I would kill it without hesitation. I love animals, but kids are more important.

Update: I observed the dog chasing a child on a bicycle up the street today. I will call tomorrow to report that as well. I was unable to get through to anyone at animal control today, anyway. I left a message. We'll see what happens. The dog is a menace, and he only goes after children from what I can see. I can't see a happy ending to this story.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 11:35:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2004 11:38:01 PM EST by Maddogkiller]
.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 11:37:15 PM EST
If you have a shotgun, that would be a better tool than a hand gun. You could remove the lead pellets and replace them with rock salt or uncooked rice. Two shells of RS/Rice with a few lead rounds as back up.

Keep in mind that if your babies are near by when you fire, they could experience hearing loss.
Link Posted: 9/29/2004 11:37:25 PM EST
If possible Id try to hit it with the car
Link Posted: 9/30/2004 12:25:53 AM EST
Shoot, Shovel, Shut up!

(The Kids come first, I know you'll do the right thing)

Link Posted: 10/2/2004 8:36:13 AM EST
There are two major issues here - safely, and legality. The safest (and least legal) measure is to kill the dog without warning or provocation, drag it off, and bury it. The most legal (and least safe) is to put pressure on Animal Control until they finally act decisively. The most legal and most safe (and least acceptable) is to barricade yourself in your house, board up the windows, and have pizza dropped in through the chimmney over a roaring fire - sure, it'll be a little crispy, but I like my food a little crispy.

As far as legalities go, I'd personally take some nice, clear photos of the dog, leashless, on your property (or public property, like the street), write up a letter of complaint - including the failed attack on your baby - and mail it to Animal Control to establish not only a paper trail, but a paper trail that identifies the precise animal in question. Additionally, I might suggest that a firearm, depending on the authorities in the area, might get you in trouble for discharge of a firearm within city limits. That's not to say don't use one, but be aware - a baseball bat, mace, or a good sword may be more or less effective, depending on your skill and how you're taking care of the baby.

If action is taken, of course, call the police to report the animal attack, first caller usually the victim, etc. etc. normal self-defense advice.
Top Top