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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/1/2005 8:58:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2005 8:58:57 PM EDT by JohnnyMcEldoo]
I have keratoconus which is basically where the cornea is shaped irregular and affects vision. My eye doctor says conreal transplants are on the horizon when glasses no longer help. They basically take cornea tissue from a dead person and sew it into your eye. He said it has a high success rate.

Anyone here have it or know someone who had?
Link Posted: 9/1/2005 9:25:02 PM EDT
I've got it also. It is my understanding that even with the operation you might still have to wear contacts. Since I see OK with hard contacts I'm holding out til they can guarantee 20/20 vision. I've also heard that the next generation of corrective surgery will be much better than the current Lasik and work for kerataconus
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 4:44:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crustaceous:
I've got it also. It is my understanding that even with the operation you might still have to wear contacts. Since I see OK with hard contacts I'm holding out til they can guarantee 20/20 vision. I've also heard that the next generation of corrective surgery will be much better than the current Lasik and work for kerataconus



My eye doctor said the same thing that I might still have to wear glasses/contacts. He also said transplants had a 95% success rate. Im like you though, Im not in a hurry with technology advancing as fast as it is.

Its very surprising to me they cant do more for us. I did read an article a year or so ago that college professors were making synthetic corneas using cadaver corneas that could not be used. I guess good corneas are in short supply.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 4:52:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By crustaceous:
I've got it also. It is my understanding that even with the operation you might still have to wear contacts. Since I see OK with hard contacts I'm holding out til they can guarantee 20/20 vision. I've also heard that the next generation of corrective surgery will be much better than the current Lasik and work for kerataconus



Do you have any idea if previous Lasik patients will be able to have the newer surgeries?
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 5:30:40 PM EDT
Girl I went to college with had the procedure. The last year of school she had to carry around a pager, and she ended up getting a donor after we graduated. I think she still has to wear contacts, but she was blind as a bat beforehand.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 5:44:35 PM EDT
Had it done about 12 years ago for kerataconus, at the U of M hospitals. Tried correcting it with a hard lens, just couldn't get one to fit comfortably, it was warped too bad. The only bad thing about the surgery was that I was awake during it, and when I started thinking about what they were doing, I freaked out a bit. Got myself to settle down, though.

The eye settled down to about 20/40 (it was estimated at 20/300 before the surgery) after a year, maybe a bit more. Every time they took a stitch out, it would change slightly. It's still got some astigmatism, but it's correctable to 20/15 with a Toric soft lens. It was quite amazing how much my eyesight improved immediately after the operation - the next day was 20/70 uncorrected. I was told that they had quite a cornea bank, I had the operation scheduled about 2 months in advance.

I was told they believe it is caused by eye rubbing, as they see it in people with heavy allergies and those with Down's syndrome. I only had it in one eye, which they said was pretty rare, also. I go for a yearly checkup for it, and they say it looks great. Had one bout with rejection about 3 years afterwards, but it was cleared up with eyedrops. I've asked about Lasik to cure the astigmatism, but the doctor doesn't really recommend it since I've had the transplant.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 5:58:25 PM EDT
One of my concerns is cost. Id say its a little cheaper now than it was 12 years ago. My doctor estimated my eyes without correction is about 20/500. He seems to think I will need the surgery in the next 2-3 years.
I havnt checked but Im hoping my insurance would cover this type of operation.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:06:11 PM EDT
My medical insurance did cover it. What they wouldn't cover, however, was the 2 years of trying to fit a contact lens to it instead of having the operation. Tried 3 lenses at about $180 each. The office said it's the first time they were ever refused for covering the lenses. They even called the insurance company and argued with them that those special lenses are a cure for a medical disease, not for normal sight problems. I shouldn't think you would have a problem with your medical insurance company not covering the operation.

I do have to say I am very careful now whenever doing any kind of work. I wear safety glasses for everything! Having the operation sure did make me aware of how precious eyesight is.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:12:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NotMrWizard:

I do have to say I am very careful now whenever doing any kind of work. I wear safety glasses for everything! Having the operation sure did make me aware of how precious eyesight is.




Are there any activities that you cant do now that youve had the surgery?

I meant to add earlier, I cannot imagine being awake when this surgery is taking place! I dont know how people do it.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:29:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 6:29:43 PM EDT by NotMrWizard]

Originally Posted By JohnnyMcEldoo:

Are there any activities that you cant do now that youve had the surgery?




Nope. I told the doc I play racquetball, waterski, snowski, and participate in shooting sports. But he did tell me to not enter into any pickup boxing matches. He said that he sees more eye injuries from racquetball than any other sport, though. And he did stress that one good hit to the eye now (not to the bone or area around it, but to the eye itself) can have a very bad outcome for the sight in that eye, as it is a bit weaker now. Just need to be careful.


I meant to add earlier, I cannot imagine being awake when this surgery is taking place! I dont know how people do it.


36 stitches! Counted about 24 of them going in, too! He did 24 in a continuous zig-zag pattern around it, then put in another 12 singles radially around it. I found a step-by-step cornea transplant by Googling, if your not too squeamish! Don't want to scare you away from it, but you could look like this when you're done!!


Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:07:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NotMrWizard:
[
36 stitches! Counted about 24 of them going in, too! He did 24 in a continuous zig-zag pattern around it, then put in another 12 singles radially around it. I found a step-by-step cornea transplant by Googling, if your not too squeamish! Don't want to scare you away from it, but you could look like this when you're done!!





Thats a pretty graphic link and thanks. I actually had to stop looking at it though cause I was getting cold sweats! I would seriously be on edge getting this done. Did they give you any kind of muscle relaxers? I know they numb your eye but I cant imagine going in without some kind of relaxer.

Did your eyes hurt much after the surgery?
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