Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 9/25/2002 12:48:33 PM EDT
I'm just about positive I want to enlist in the Army. There is no way in hell I'm going to let a recruiter talk me into doing something I don't want to do. I'm confident I will do very well on the asvab... but I'm afraid if I do as good as I can they will give me some bullshit about how my scores were to high to do what I want to do... which is Airborne school, then ranger school. Just about everyone I know thinks I'm crazy because I [i]want[/i] to be a ground pounding grunt... but thats a different story..heh. I've already decided if the recruiter or whoever I talk to won't quit trying to talk me into other things I'm just going to thank them for their time walk away. So... anyone have any advice? Can things like airborne and ranger school be worked into my contract? I've read they can, but it was on a non-DoD website so there is no way to tell if thats accurate. Is there any way to go to a recruiter, and just get information, without them calling my house 5 times a day? Just thought I'd ask here since I figure a forum of AR fans, someone is bound to have some military experience.[:)]
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 12:58:17 PM EDT
Don't believe everything the recruiter tells you. If he won't put it writing, he's lying. Do not sign up if he won't give you a guranteed job placement in writing. All of the recruiters are hurting for numbers right now. If this guy won't give you what you want, threaten to go to the Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, etc. If he still won't give you a guaranteed job, walk! The other branches will be glad to help you out.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:03:28 PM EDT
Get EVERYTHING they promise you in writing, make lots of copies and have them laminated.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:05:16 PM EDT
The first thing to remember when talking to any recruiter, HE'S NOT YOUR FRIEND. He has a job to do and you're that job. It doesn't matter if he's giving you movie tickets or taking you cool places, he's still not your friend. Try to think what you'd like to put on your resume when you're done with the military. I pretty sure HIRED KILLER isn't it. Fred
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:06:06 PM EDT
Let them convince you. If you know what you would like to do in the Army so much the better. When it comes time to sign on the dotted line, its something for something. They get you for 4 years in return for you getting your mos. You should not have a problem with being too smart. If you are not running on a daily basis, start today. You dont want to wash because you cant keep up. Also get your mind right. Lebrew
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:08:01 PM EDT
(HE'S NOT YOUR FRIEND. He has a job to do and you're that job ) Now aint that a fact!
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:14:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:19:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/25/2002 1:57:12 PM EDT by Jarhead_22]
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:23:42 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fredshort: The first thing to remember when talking to any recruiter, HE'S NOT YOUR FRIEND. He has a job to do and you're that job. It doesn't matter if he's giving you movie tickets or taking you cool places, he's still not your friend. Try to think what you'd like to put on your resume when you're done with the military. I pretty sure HIRED KILLER isn't it. Fred
View Quote
If by HIRED KILLER you mean a veteran who served in combat arms, I can't think of anything better to put on a resume!
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:32:56 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CantHitShit:
Originally Posted By fredshort: The first thing to remember when talking to any recruiter, HE'S NOT YOUR FRIEND. He has a job to do and you're that job. It doesn't matter if he's giving you movie tickets or taking you cool places, he's still not your friend. Try to think what you'd like to put on your resume when you're done with the military. I pretty sure HIRED KILLER isn't it. Fred
View Quote
That hasn't been what I've seen. I have plenty of buddies who served admirably in combat arms, and can't find decent work in many sectors because they don't have the resume skillset that job recruiters are looking for. Don't go into combat arms to pad your resume. There are many reasons to serve in a combat arm, but "hiring time" isn't one of them. Jobs are tight nowadays. If by HIRED KILLER you mean a veteran who served in combat arms, I can't think of anything better to put on a resume!
View Quote
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:34:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CantHitShit:
Originally Posted By fredshort: The first thing to remember when talking to any recruiter, HE'S NOT YOUR FRIEND. He has a job to do and you're that job. It doesn't matter if he's giving you movie tickets or taking you cool places, he's still not your friend. Try to think what you'd like to put on your resume when you're done with the military. I pretty sure HIRED KILLER isn't it. Fred
View Quote
If by HIRED KILLER you mean a veteran who served in combat arms, I can't think of anything better to put on a resume!
View Quote
That hasn't been what I've seen. I have plenty of buddies who served admirably in combat arms, and now can't find decent work in many sectors because they don't have the resume skillset that job recruiters are looking for. Don't go into combat arms to pad your resume. There are many reasons to serve in a combat arm, but "hiring time" isn't one of them. Jobs are tight nowadays. Do what you think is right for you.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:35:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer: just like a lawyer. If his lips are moving he's lying. mike
View Quote
HEY!
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:37:14 PM EDT
Maybe this is a little off topic, but why is it that Air Force recruiters avoid you like the plague if you even hint toward having an interest in talking to the Marine recruiter? Back on subject, the army recruiters must get bonuses for getting recruits to go infantry. I scored in the 90's on the asvab, and it appeared like they were discouraging me from wanting to enter anything technical, computer, or intelligence related. In the ads at that time, they were pushing high tech jobs, then telling you to go infantry in person. I can only conclude that the recruiter gets a kickback, or is a grunt, and that's all he knows how to sell.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:40:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/25/2002 1:52:31 PM EDT by Hoplite]
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:44:23 PM EDT
I actually had a good recruiter that was very straight forward and honest. He gave me some of the best advice out there and saved me the headache of not getting my MOS. Granted most recruiters are pieces of shit, be more cautious with the MEPS people. I was told by my recruiter that they will tell me my MOS (91B) is full and try to give me tank turret repair or something. That is exactly what they did when I got to MEPS! I followed my recruiters advice and stuck to my decision to be a medic, and when I was told I couldn't have it I said I would try the Navy or Air Force and thanked them for their time. Those MEPS guys panicked and ended up giving me the MOS I wanted. Another trick they tried to get me with was a minimum height requirement to be an MP. They said you have to be 5'10" (i'm 5'9") and I wasn't eligible for it, BS! Just don't let them dick you around. Go in with what you want in mind and don't budge, they don't own you till you raise your hand.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:53:25 PM EDT
Since you are looking for ABN/Ranger, you won't just have "Combat Arms" to put on a resume - there are some subspecialtied in those fields. I'd probably look at trying to be a radioman - which would qualify you for PD/FD dispatch when you get out, or Small Arms, which you could then take to a PD. I don't guarantee that you will get those gigs when you get out (of course!) but you should select your MOS with a mind to where you could use it later. Being a "leg" just don't help much when you get out - you have to do something else... You may also want to look into when you get eligible for cross-training, and stack up a couple MOSs for later. Just a thought... And, it's a lie until it's SIGNED! If your recruiter won't sign it, you won't get it (even if it's written.) I know I shocked my recruiter when I took notes everytime I talked to him, and told him to READ and SIGN before I left... FFZ
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:54:18 PM EDT
Sounds to me like you want to be front line, ground-pounding Infantry. Don't just tell the recruiter that you want Infantry, as there are about 5 or so different variations of infantry jobs. Tell the recruiter you want 11B and ONLY 11B and then you want Airborne and Ranger after that. Don't let the jerk tell you that you can just go into Ranger school after Airborne and don't really need guaranteed placement...that's bullshit. If you did just want information, just tell the recruiter that you don't want to give out your phone number and you're just curious. They should be fine with that. Get your bonus and college GI Bill in writing up front as well. If your asvab scores are that high, there should be no reason why you can't get the max. Keep in mind though...Infantry is a carrier. I say that because if you decide to get out of the service after your first tour the only thing you are qualified to do is being a custodian in a high school somewhere...'cause there isn't much of a job market in the private sector for grunts, but you'll learn all about cleaning and polishing floors. [:D] Like the others on the thread, I can't stress enough to get everything written down up front. DO NOT let the recruiter convice you that you "can just get it later on without a problem" or "it's automatic". I have first hand experience on this one since I didn't get my bonus written down when I signed up in '87 and they screwed me good! Good luck!
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 1:55:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/25/2002 1:56:14 PM EDT by Hoplite]
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:09:16 PM EDT
One thing in writing spelled out!
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:16:27 PM EDT
Know what YOU want and stick to it. If your scores are high, you have the upperhand. When I went in, I wanted to be a Mechanic, but also Airborne. They said no way and I got up and walked out. The guy caought up to me and said he would make a phone call, he made it happen. Also, get anything he tells you that is important to you IN WRITING. Good luck, I wish I could do it all over again, I would go infantry too.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:24:23 PM EDT
I've definately thought about the fact that infantry/airborne/ranger wouldn't really set me up for a civilian career. I'm not positive.. but I think you can change your MOS later on? Now if I decided I was done with the military after 4 years... I was planning to try to start a law enforcement career. If that didn't work out, I would be heading off to college (I plan to take full advantage of the militarys education benefits). I think I have a pretty good plan in my head.
With airborne/RIP contract you will go in without an assigned duty station. If you do not get into a ranger bat you can be sent anywhere (even regular light, non airborne units) or you can be sent to an airborne unit (Italy, Bragg, JRTC op for, Alaska) Its a toss up do you want a ranger bat or a guaranteed duty station?
View Quote
Hmm.. I never really thought of that. It would definately suck to be stuck doing something I hate and never wanted to do in the first place because I couldn't cut it during RIP. Thats definately something I'll have to think about. Could I go airborne, stick with it for a while, the request to be reassigned and start RIP? Thanks for the info guys. I've posted things like this on all the forums I frequent, and you guys have been the most helpful.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:29:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ArmyInf: Sounds to me like you want to be front line, ground-pounding Infantry.
View Quote
You got that right [:D] If I wanted to sit at a desk all day I'd stay in the civilian world and make 10 time more money..heh.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:34:50 PM EDT
dskeet, Alot of fine advice here, did you hear anyone mention to GET IT IN WRITING. If by the off chance you didn't catch the message: Whatever the recruiter promises you - GET IT IN WRITING!!!! Okay, my advice is to go in with the end in mind. If you want to make a career of the military, great, 11B's move through the ranks pretty fast. But you'll be a ground pounder for 20 years, it's damn impossible to move out of 11B. Take it from me, a former Ranger, it was fun for about the first couple of years, then sleeping in the winter rain started to suck. I am dam proud to do what I have done, some of which people can read about in books, but it's a tough life - no shit. IMHO, 11B is good if you want some short term adventure and to go to college afterwards on the benefits. For someone with no college, a $5,000 bonus and $25,000 to go to school with, is a dam good deal. That $30,000 of value over 4 years, I dont know of too many people who can save that much in that period of time. All this for only a 4 year commitment. However, if you are thinking career, then, IMHO, try the Coast Guard and get Hawaii as a duty station. Or go Air Crew in the Air Force, the commercial airlines pay great and hire military readily. If it must be Army, get a good MOS like, Military Intelligence, Interrogator, or flight crew. At least you'll be able to see the world. I saw the world as a Ranger, but only a piece of some jungle somewhere up to my neck in swamp, or with someone poppin caps at me. Try to figure out what you want out of the service before you go in. TSL
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:37:36 PM EDT
I forgot to mention, that if you get a career in writing and then fail, you will be assigned according to the needs of the Army. This is usually a cook, or worse. So, if you sign up for Defense Languages, then wash out, be ready for BOHICA.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:39:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:44:26 PM EDT
REPEAT!!! GET EVERYTHING HE PROMISES IN WRITING OR IT WILL NOT HAPPEN!
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 2:46:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 3:10:14 PM EDT
You can easily tell when the recruiter is lying to you. His lips will move.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 3:34:28 PM EDT
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but does anyone know the bonus that comes with an MD? I'll have mine in 2 more years, and I feel I need to serve, but have a mountain in school debt. thanks, tony
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 3:34:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TSL: IMHO, 11B is good if you want some short term adventure and to go to college afterwards on the benefits. For someone with no college, a $5,000 bonus and $25,000 to go to school with, is a dam good deal. That $30,000 of value over 4 years, I dont know of too many people who can save that much in that period of time. All this for only a 4 year commitment.
View Quote
Thats really what I am leaning towards. I am definately looking to the military for some adventure.. lots of it. I will be disappointed if I get out without any combat experience... much like my dad was when he retired without seeing any action (he was a CH-47 pilot.. his advice about the army is "be an officer or don't do it at all"). I don't think I'll be able to stand 20 years as a ground pounding infantryman. So I was thinking.. do it for 4-8 years, then get out and go to school, and like I said in an earlier post, try to start a law enforcement career. [b]New question...[/b] Do you have any say what-so-ever in where your duty station is, or what unit you go to? Like if I did just Airborne.. could I put in a preference of the 82nd AB Div and being stationed at Fort Bragg.. or is it "you go where we put you, and you will like it"?
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 4:09:06 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 4:17:21 PM EDT
Do you have any say what-so-ever in where your duty station is, or what unit you go to? Like if I did just Airborne.. could I put in a preference of the 82nd AB Div and being stationed at Fort Bragg.. or is it "you go where we put you, and you will like it"?
View Quote
The duty station you can get in your contract - assuming the AFQT score on your asvab is above the cutoff number. Lets say you wanted 82nd airborne, infantry. The contract should say 11x (entry level infantry is now 11x), airborne school and the date you will be attending (probably within a week or so after you complete osut), and the written duty station of Fort Bragg, NC. It should also say 82nd Airborne just for a little insurance. Don't laugh, but its a good idea to study for the asvab. I'm sure you'll do fine without studying, but there are certain specialties they test for that the asvab study guides can prepare you for, plus consider you have to make above a certain score to be able to get a guarenteed duty station. I found plenty of study guides at the local library and got a AFQT of 99, and none of my line score were below 123. I was qualified for any MOS I wanted, which was a good feeling, but like you I wanted infantry. Hope that helps...
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 5:46:57 PM EDT
Well, thats good to hear. I was going to be really pissed if I got sent to Kalifornistan [:)] I'm not so sure about taking a shot at becoming a Ranger anymore. I'd love to give it a shot, and if I make it the sense of pride and accomplishment would be great... but if I didn't make it.. the idea that what I would be doing in the Army is out of my hands is kind of scary. Thats alot at stake [:|] I like to have some say about where my life is going... The grunt turned warrant officer helo pilot is definately something I'm going to look into. When I first had thoughts about joining the army my only ideas were airborne/ranger, or a helo pilot. I never really thought about doing both. Well, this thread seems to be petering out.. so I just want to say thanks for all the info [8D] I'll probably go see a recruiter in the near future, I'll be sure to post my experience so I can get more feedback.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 6:29:47 PM EDT
dude go 12B,thats an order from the col.[:D]
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 6:51:10 PM EDT
Some pretty good advice in here. I was also one of those college degreed ASVAB maxing people that was set on Airborne and Infantry. And that's what I got. If you go RIP remember it's three weeks of getting the shit smoked out of you, they have a pretty high failure rate. And if you don't make it it's off to Korea or Alaska with a lot of them( no that's not what happened to me). Probably 75% of the new privates we get are RIP flunkies. But at least they ended up in an airborne unit and aren't legs up north . If you don't get RIP and decide later you want Ranger school, any good squad leader and platoon sergeant will be ready to help you, it's just a matter of putting in your packet and waiting for a slot to open up. But it will probably be a while before they feel you're ready, and they won't and should not send you til you are ready.
Link Posted: 9/25/2002 8:08:00 PM EDT
Well, I don't think I'm going to try to get RIP in my contract. Since I'd basically be a fresh faced private right out of basic... the odds would really be against me.. and I would really hate to start my military experience on a failure. I think I'll stick in the airborne for a year or so to get some experience, then try to find my way to ranger school. Probably want my duty station to be Fort Bragg or Fort Campbell. That would be the 82nd or 101st AB, right? Also.. if I get airborne and Ft. Bragg as my duty station... does it basically go without saying that I would be in the 82nd AB Div? Thanks again! All this advice really has helped my uneasiness that I was feeling about seeing a recruiter.
Link Posted: 9/26/2002 11:36:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dskeet: Well, I don't think I'm going to try to get RIP in my contract. Since I'd basically be a fresh faced private right out of basic... the odds would really be against me.. and I would really hate to start my military experience on a failure. I think I'll stick in the airborne for a year or so to get some experience, then try to find my way to ranger school.
View Quote
Better plan in my opinion. A Ranger battallion is super-infantry. You have to be super fit, super motivated and very type A to make it into and to make it in a Ranger battallion. If you cannot pass the Army PT test for a 17 year old now, you'll have a tough row to hoe to pass the PT test for RIP entry. You want to run a lot and run hard. The running is what causes a lot of RIP students to wash out, they simply lack the endurence needed. I'm not talking about preparing by running a couple miles every day either, you should be working up to 10k runs and more. Here's another trick. In between Infantry OSUT training (One Station Unit Training) and RIP, you will go through the Basic Airborne Course at Ft. Benning. This three week program can be a ton of fun, but you have to work extra hard to stay fit since there will be no "smoke-session" workouts in BAC. You'll run a bit further than you did in OSUT, but the pace is not difficult and it's a formation run environment which makes it easier. The BUDS graduates who were going through BAC on the way to SEAL teams, spent a lot of their free time in the base pool and running and working out on their own to stay in SEAL condition. You always saw them hanging on the pullup bars when the rest of us were tuckered out sitting on our asses in the sawdust pits. When we were talking with our girlfriends on the phone, they were doing push-ups in the waiting line, or they were out running as a class. You'll want to try to emulate that if you do decide to go RIP. One more thing, the Ranger Battallions consider teamwork to be super critical to their effectiveness, thus, they do everything as a unit....including take leave. So if you were to go infantry, airborne and RIP, pass through all three unscathed and get assigned to one of the three Ranger batts (you'll be in Georgia, trust me, very few manage to get to Ft. Lewis since that is the most popular station) you will not, like the rest of the guys in your OSUT class, be getting leave between OSUT and the Batt. You will wait until the Batt takes leave, and Murphy's law being what it is, your Batt will have just gotten off leave and won't be scheduled to go again until next year. Guess what? Short of an injury, a family emergency or something else of that sort, you won't be going home for another year. That can be REAL tough for a young guy who has never been away from home before to take. One more thing...No matter how good you are, accidents happen in Airborne School. Let your mind wander for a second while landing and you can wind up with a broken leg (like me). Then you'll spend three-four weeks in the hospital on post before they send you home for 30 days of convalescent leave. You'll then spend a couple more weeks in the hospital being evaled and Physical therapied before they send you to 1/507th HHC (Headquarters and Headquarters Company for the Airborne School) where you will pull a couple weeks of meaningless and mind numbing duty around the school awaiting either recycle in the Airborne school (unlikely) or reassignment at the need of the Army. If injured, and you can pass the PT test for entry into Airborne School within a set period of time (I believe 30 days of release from the hospital) you can recycle to another class. This is extremely rare for fractures...sprained ankles can sometimes manage it. I got reassigned to the First Armored Division, 7th Bn, 6th Infantry (Mech.) in Germany. Since I was well and truly buggered up from my impact with the ground (on my third jump I sprained both ankles, twisted a knee and fractured a fibula) I ended up as a parts clerk in the motor pool and has an absolutely miserable friggin' time for the rest of my enlistment. So get as fit as you possibly can get before enlisting. Go the Y, get on an aggressive weight training program with emphasis on the legs. Start running A LOT, do a ton of push ups and crunches, etc. I'd also recommend taking up swimming. It is excellent conditioning for the heart and lungs and you need to be confident in the water to get into RIP. Did I forget to mention the 50 meter combat gear swim? It's all pretty overwhelming for most new privates to take on. Competitive athletes are probably better prepared for the life than most, but even they have trouble adapting sometimes. I'd recommend that you go in with an infantry, airborne contract, with a guaranteed duty station of Ft. Bragg, 82nd Airborne Division. Spend at least a couple years in the 82nd just getting confident as an infantryman, learning everything you can, getting as military fit as possible and working hard to get some rank. If you get offered a school, take it. Every school you get is promotion points on your record and qualifications that will make you more attractive to the Ranger Regiment or possibly to SF if that's the way you want to go. Those high speed organizations want disciplined, self-motivated individuals who always seek to exceed the standards and do their best to represent their service in the best possible light. If you are lucky and you impress your squad leader, platoon sargeant and first sargeant, they might be able to get you a slot in Ranger school. That in itself won't guarantee you a slot in a Battallion though. THere are tons of Ranger qualified soldiers in the Army who have never served in the regiment. Chaplains go to Ranger and SF schools. Most infantry officers and NCO's eventually have a go at Ranger school. If the 82nd sends you to Ranger School, they want a qualified Ranger coming back to the 82nd to bring that expertise into the division. Your next chance to get into the regiment will be at re-enlistment time.
Probably want my duty station to be Fort Bragg or Fort Campbell. That would be the 82nd or 101st AB, right?
View Quote
The 101 Abn is not a Parachute Infantry division like the 82nd. It is an Air Assault division. They fly in on helicopters bringing a boat load of gear with them. The school to get for a slot at 101 is Air Assault school, where you will learn to rappel out of a helicopter, fast rope out of a helicopter, sling load artillery pieces and vehicles under helicopters, etc. Very practical school and application actually.
Also.. if I get airborne and Ft. Bragg as my duty station... does it basically go without saying that I would be in the 82nd AB Div?
View Quote
No. Get 82nd Airborne Division in writing on the contract and make sure you have the recruiter explain everything on your contract that you do not understand fully, including all abbreviations etc. and the conditions under which the contract and all the benefits would be voided. Some benefits are tied to you completing all the terms of the contract, so if you broke your leg in airborne school, you might lose some benefits for failing to qualify and advance to your guaranteed duty station. Good luck and don't be afraid to take your time and think things through or talk things out with your parents or friends who have already gone through this. The recruiters want you and they'll work to get you. Let them.
Link Posted: 9/26/2002 12:56:47 PM EDT
Dskeet I did exactly what you are talking about got airborn and rip in my contract. left for basic 6 days after graduating high school made it through basic,AB and rip thought it was smooth sailing then was stationed at 1st bat then the real hard part started. I'll have to say it was the best and worst.as far as resume if you want law enforcement thats fine thats what i do. as far anything else the army didnt help my resume. would i do things different i probley would but you have to make up your mind if i hadnt done it i would always be wondering if i could have made it. the main thing has been stated numerous times GET IT IN WRITTING! tnrifleman
Link Posted: 9/26/2002 12:58:39 PM EDT
Just in case you didn't get it the previous 50+ times: GET IT IN WRITING!
Link Posted: 9/26/2002 1:06:16 PM EDT
dskeet- I just enlisted this past June and during July, August and part of September I was completing my basic training at Fort Knox, KY. I'm a 19 Delta in Army National Guard (yeah a Nasty Girl as they Regular Army guys call it) and I did the split option training. That's Cav Scout Recon. I was going to go 11B but I'm really glad another recruiter talked me out of it. He had nothing to gain as I was already being processed by mine, but the Cavalry is much higher speed than the Infantry. I can only speak first hand about basic training, but 19D OSUT vs. their BCT (basic combat training) ours was much more intense and through. For a small example we learned demolitions using C4 were as other combat arms do not and are in much better shape. All the advice giving here is good but I'd have to say icemanat95 has it just about nailed down tight. We had two guys going Airborne in my platoon and they both had Ranger school in their contract. This is a must One really had to fight for it from what he said. The Drill Sgt. said the best time to get the job you want is the end of each month. They are less willing to f' around with you to meet their month end quotas. Get your duty station in writing as well. Benning is best and you don't want FT. Polk (the one in Louisiana in the middle of no where). There's a higher degree of becoming a "5 jump chump" From what I hear that's when you get you five jumps in to get qualified and never see a chute again. Not by choice either. This is just something the D.S. was saying to scare our two guys so take it with a grain of salt. I heard about getting Italy too.That's supposed to be the dream duty station, but again I don't know about that for sure either. Long story short is get Airborne and duty station in writing. Don't worry about SF yet as that's too far down the road and you'll probably get your fill long before then. Pull up's, pull up's, pull up's if you want to be a Ranger. OSUT you need around a 14 minute two mile run, 50 push-ups, and 60 sit-ups. It varies by age but I'm thirty years old and that's what I did so you have to do better than me or I'll call ya a girly man [:D]. Yah, I waited awhile to join up but the youngins had nothing on me. Of course they called me Pop though. Any specific question about enlisting or basic email me and I'll try to help. So far that's the two areas I can speak on with some certainty. Good Luck.
Link Posted: 9/26/2002 11:27:16 PM EDT
Ugh... now I'm all worried about getting to jump school and trashing my legs on landing... How common is that? I'd imagine I can really reduce the risk if my legs are as strong as I can possibly get them between now and jump school? It seems every option I explore has a huge potential downside to it. Like if I don't make it in RIP, I'll get stuck doing some BS I hate... just like if I get hurt at jump school.[:|] I'm going to do some research on Air Assault now too. I was originally planning not to enlist until springtime.. but I've been getting a little restless and was thinking about doing it really soon. But after hearing about how I should be physically... I think I'll be going back to my original plan. I definately need to work on the physical side of things. 50 meter combat gear swim....ehh..yeah heard about it... I think I should re-learn to swim [:)] Its been like 10 years since I have even tried.
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 6:41:45 AM EDT
I'm going to do some research on Air Assault now too.
View Quote
Well, if you lose grip on a rope at 100 feet up, you won't have to worry about injury - if you know what i mean. [xx(] I tried to research the 101st 11b's as far as how their job/training differs from the 82nd 11b's. I never found out that much, except obviously they don't have to do all the nighttime parachute drops ad nauseum like the 82nd - not to say the 101st doesn't have some kind of equivelent. Maybe theres a recent 101st trooper around here who can enlighten us?
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 7:29:59 AM EDT
1.Get it in writing 2.USMC
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 7:48:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dskeet: Ugh... now I'm all worried about getting to jump school and trashing my legs on landing... How common is that? I'd imagine I can really reduce the risk if my legs are as strong as I can possibly get them between now and jump school?
View Quote
The big question is (no bullsh*tting now) what kind of condition are you in now and how active a lifestyle have you been living over the past few years? That has a lot to do with skeletal development, coordination, and physical confidence. If you have been a competitive athlete during high school and maintain a decent level of fitness even off season, you are in a far better position than someone like me was in when I joined. I had just spent 4 relatively sedentary years in college and was in pretty poor shape. So my bones had adapted to that lifestyle as had my muscle mass. By the end of OSUT I was in great shape, but, because I didn't have a long history of physical achievement behind me, I was less coordinated and physically confident as I should have been. It took me a bit longer than I would have liked to get the hang of the parachute landing fall...it was NOT automatic when jump week came around. So... Third jump of the week, second of the day, it was starting to get dark. I jumped, had a pretty good exit with no twisting or tangling. Good canopy, good rate of decent, only a little oscillation (just enough to screw up my assessment of which angle I should be slipping to, etc. So Down I come, right in the center of Fryar Field (the largest jump zone on Ft. Benning). Fryar Field is a big, long field plowed up a good foot deep of nice soft sandy loam. Perfect for new jumpers. But...there is a big drainage ditch right smack in the middle of it with nice sloping sides that the plows don't touch. So there is unkempt grass on the slopes and when grass is allowed to grow wild it tends to hummock up. Frankly this is not a bad thing to confront parachutists with since 9 times out of ten in a combat jump, you will be jumping onto untilled fields, forests, airfields, etc. However, those buggers are absolutely unforgiving of poor technique. I landed right on top of one of 'em and had broken the cardinal rule of parachuting, I let my feet and knees come just a little bit apart so they were no longer providing mutual support. Each leg and ankle had to take the impact on it's own when I hit that hummock. I heard my leg snap like a twig. However, parachute injuries at BAC are not that common. Mostly mild to moderate sprains. You generally have to screw up pretty good or suffer a severe equipment failure to get as messed up as I was. Consider that the average Airborne training company has upwards of 350 students. I was one of maybe three in my whole company who was knocked out due to a jump injury. So don't worry that much about it. Also, as far as I can remember, I was also the only one whose injury was severe enough to prevent me from recycling to a later jump class. So don't sweat it, chances are, if you make it into jump school, you will make it through jump school, well over 75% do make it through. As far as when to enlist. Go delayed entry program and take some time to get really fit. Run, run, run, and run some more. Endurance is critical. Push ups are also a great exercise. A great low-cost workout program is the Navy SEALs recommended workout for BUD/S candidates. It is an aggressive program that requires a serious daily commitment (a few hours a day)over about three months. BY the time you complete the program, you will be fit enough to take on not just infantry OSUT and Airborne School, but also RIP (so long as you can maintain that conditioning through OSUT). Try to find a training manual for airborne operations that describes the parachute landing fall (the basic landing method) in detail. Then practice, practice,practice at home. Start by simply hopping forward on the ground and doing a plf, then work up into jumping off a chair onto some padding or the ground and practicing the movement. There are eight possible variations, but they are all similar. You should also familiarize yourself with airborne emergency landing procedures and immediate action drills if you can gain access to that info. The more of that stuff you get in your head prior to hitting BAC, the better off you will be when you get there. You won't have to be learning it under pressure, just learning how to implement it under real-world or simulation conditions. Cav Scout is actually a pretty good MOS. You are essentially an infantryman who operates out of a Bradley Armored Cavalry vehicle. You can be assigned to an Armored Cav Regiment, or to a Mechanized infantry regiment. A Cav scout's job is to scout ahead, locate and identify the enemy and sometimes engage them to hold them for the main force. Sniper training is fairly available to cav scouts, so is Ranger School. One of the other nice things about being a cav scout is if things get hairy, chances are you've got M1 Abrams tanks and other M3a Cav vehicles around to pull your tail out, plus air cover from your units aviation arm. Infantry pretty much relies on not being seen. I'm not trying to discourage you from going infantry, but there are other combat arms specialties that are also pretty darned neat. Armored Cav is one of them. And there ain't nothing wrong with ending up a mechanized infantryman. There is a lot of comfort in knowing that you can call on a 25 ton armored vehicle with 25 mm autocannons, 7.62mm coaxial MGs and a pair of TOW missile tubes when the going gets crazy. It's also nice to know that that vehicle has a couple of encrypted radios available to it, as well as IVIS and GPS systems that allow it to call in pinpoint accurate heavy fire on enemy positions. Even nicer that you don't have to hump that gear yourself. Whatever MOS you chose, you can always get Airborne School on your contract. We had chaplains, doctors, clerks, as well as fighter and bomber pilots, some Marine Recon grunts, about twenty not-quite SEALs, etc. in our class. You just need to score the ASVAB points and have them wanting you bad enough to give you the school. Also, If law enforcement is where you want to be consider going for MP, with an airborne contract and a guaranteed duty station of the 18th Airborne Corps at Ft. Bragg. There is an Airborne MP battallion in the 18th Corps that jumps with the 82nd. You'll get to do some higher speed stuff, jump out of airplanes, and have a readily transferable skill to the civilian sector. There are tons of options and you should check them all out before signing on the dotted line. Don't get locked into infantry just because it seems Hooah! If that's what you really want to do, then Hooah!, but if you don't think you want to make this a career, consider getting some real world skills in the process. Drop me an email offline if you want, I'm always willing to help.
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 8:00:52 AM EDT
GO USMC !!!!! all the way. If you are going to commit go for the real mans military!
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 9:38:56 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 10:09:40 AM EDT
Well, I was always a competitive athlete up until I was 16, then I just got sick of it all and gave it up. Just wasn't fun anymore. I'm 20 now. These last 4 years I've stayed in decent shape, mostly because I've had jobs that kept me pretty active. I'm definately going to look into the SEAL workout you mentioned. I found a workout routine for people looking to be a ranger, and it was nothing short of intense. I'm between jobs right now, so I have nothing but free time.. so there won't be any trouble finding time do get in shape. Iceman, I'll definately get in touch with you if I have more questions.
GO USMC !!!!! all the way. If you are going to commit go for the real mans military!
View Quote
Come on... we all know the real men join the air force![:P]
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 10:21:06 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Moondog: Maybe this is a little off topic, but why is it that Air Force recruiters avoid you like the plague if you even hint toward having an interest in talking to the Marine recruiter?
View Quote
Because the recruiter realizes that he very well might be wasting his time talking to you as you are not commited to joining the USAF, but instead, might choose to join a military branch of service. [:D]
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 10:36:25 AM EDT
http://www.marines.com/
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 10:44:35 AM EDT
www.navy.com I was a navy nuke for 6 years, finished my Masters and bachelors degrees. I learned skills that I can place on a resume other than, "Well disciplined and listens well. Can handle stress,..." Go Navy, keep a personality. Sure you go to sea, but you can play with all the AR15s you want to on shore. (Ok, just don't get stationed in Hawaii, or you are stuck with 10 rounders...) GET IT IN WRITING. TELL THE RECRUITER YOU AREN'T TAKING ANY $HIT.
Link Posted: 9/27/2002 11:32:07 AM EDT
Okay this is probably too late, but here we go. Just for reference I was discharged in '99, so I am pretty recent. We live in peculiar time here, times when hey have now for the first time started enlisting Special Forces off the streets. Most of the above is true, but here's a few corrections, and something that I feel you should know. For the last four weeks I in, I was sent back to my recruiting Sergeant and worked with him on recruiting people at my old high school. I learned a few tricks that they use. First of all Recruiters are not limited to "this or that" in thier recruitment bonuses. At the beginning of the fiscal year, they are allotted a set number of each type of bonus, and are free to gaurantee the bonuses as they see fit. YOU DO HAVE THE OPTION OF "ALL OR NOTHING" WITH THE ARMY. NO OTHER SERVICE HAS THIS FLEXIBILITY. On the same form as the "Gauranteed Duty Station" there is "Gauranteed Unit Assignment" THIS IS DIFFERENT THAN A GAURANTEED "Ranger Indoctrination Program" School Slot. Also, the general enlistment for Infantry Soldier is 11x, but this is a generic Infantryman, at any time during your basic training they can classify you as 11c-Mortar, 11H-Humvee, or 11M-Bradly Fighting Vehicle. YOU CAN make them keep you as a 11b-Straight Infantry before you get to basic, you have to just get it in writing before. Also, you can force them to max you out with the enlistment bonuses, 4 year enlistment bonuses MAXIMUM- 40k ACF (Army College Fund) + 25k Cash + MGIB (Montgomery GI Bill) So, at the end of everything your contract should look like this- GUARANTEED MOS-11b GUARANTEED UNIT ASSIGNMENT- 75th Ranger Regiment GUARANTEED ENLISTMENT BONUSES (let's assume four years)- 40,000 ACF 25,000 CASH (you say yea/nea to the MGIB when you get to the 30th Ajunct General (Reception Battalion) at Ft. Benning. Now, if for some reason your recruiter tells you that you cannot get these, keep playing along with him. None of the signing even happens until you get to MEPS. The people that you will deal with there (I think they call them guidance counselors) are the ones who can guarantee you this stuff in writing. A recruiter gets into a lot of trouble if he can get you all the way to MEPS but cannot sign you, so your best bet is to tell him what you want and if he doesn't say yes to it, fine, keep playing along with him, but be sure you stick to your guns when you get to MEPS. Tell ya what, email me at k_leraas-at-hotmail.com, and give me your phone number I will call you on my dime and explain this in more detail if you would like. Hope this helps. -Uhlek-
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top