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Posted: 11/4/2009 9:24:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2009 9:26:03 AM EST by Dragracer_Art]
Definition here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypochondriac

I swear to God.... my wife fits this description to the letter.

She has been this way for years and it's driving me batshit crazy. Every fucking time she has the sniffles, a sore muscle, a headache, sore throat, whatever the fuck she can dream up... she needs to make a Dr appointment. She always makes comments that she "hopes this isn't something serious" and always thinks the worst... (fatal) She gets pissed at me every time I shake my head or ignore her pathetic whining about every ache and pain she has... and now it's starting to get expensive. I'm currently laid off and she works part time... so neither of us have health insurance. Every time she decides to visit the Dr... it's more wasted money.

How the hell do I fix this problem ? Does she need a shrink ?


The biggest problem I forsee is... convincing her THIS is her actual problem.

Even stupid shit she sees on TV makes her wonder if she has whatever disease or ailment is mentioned.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:28:33 AM EST
Give her the herp...
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:32:05 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2009 9:32:43 AM EST by Jmmoney]
Find a video somewhere that explains the human immune system and force her to watch it. If that doesn't work, make her pay for the Dr. Visits.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:32:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2009 9:36:23 AM EST by bigmoney327]
i majored in psych in college, but i'm not really qualified to make any type of diagnosis, but it doesn't sound like the's a hypochondriac. from a pop pscyhology standpoint, it would seem as though she fits the bill, but usually for a clinical diagnosis of something like this, i always understood that it had to be severe. at this point, it's just costing you money that you don't have, and from what you said, it seems like this wouldn't be as big a deal if you had health insurance. from what i remember, it seems like diagnosable criteria for disorders (according to the DSM IV) usually require the symptoms of the problem to be a severe hindrance on everyday life (or something to that effect).

again, from the limited info you said, i'd say she's a worry-wart that needs to lighten up, but probably not a hypochondriac. just my $.02.

ETA: the only "cure" would be to seek professional help, if a mental health professional does diagnose her as a hypochondriac.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:33:08 AM EST
.gov healthcare will fix her right up
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:34:13 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
Definition here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypochondriac

I swear to God.... my wife fits this description to the letter.

She has been this way for years and it's driving me batshit crazy. Every fucking time she has the sniffles, a sore muscle, a headache, sore throat, whatever the fuck she can dream up... she needs to make a Dr appointment. She always makes comments that she "hopes this isn't something serious" and always thinks the worst... (fatal) She gets pissed at me every time I shake my head or ignore her pathetic whining about every ache and pain she has... and now it's starting to get expensive. I'm currently laid off and she works part time... so neither of us have health insurance. Every time she decides to visit the Dr... it's more wasted money.

How the hell do I fix this problem ? Does she need a shrink ?


The biggest problem I forsee is... convincing her THIS is her actual problem.

Even stupid shit she sees on TV makes her wonder if she has whatever disease or ailment is mentioned.


Beatings. Many of them.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:35:21 AM EST

Originally Posted By NavyDoc1:
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
Definition here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypochondriac

I swear to God.... my wife fits this description to the letter.

She has been this way for years and it's driving me batshit crazy. Every fucking time she has the sniffles, a sore muscle, a headache, sore throat, whatever the fuck she can dream up... she needs to make a Dr appointment. She always makes comments that she "hopes this isn't something serious" and always thinks the worst... (fatal) She gets pissed at me every time I shake my head or ignore her pathetic whining about every ache and pain she has... and now it's starting to get expensive. I'm currently laid off and she works part time... so neither of us have health insurance. Every time she decides to visit the Dr... it's more wasted money.

How the hell do I fix this problem ? Does she need a shrink ?


The biggest problem I forsee is... convincing her THIS is her actual problem.

Even stupid shit she sees on TV makes her wonder if she has whatever disease or ailment is mentioned.


Beatings. Many of them.

I fear this is the only fool proof answer.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:36:16 AM EST
Wait until she gets fibromyalgia, followed by chronic fatique syndrome, followed by Epstein Barr virus, followed by Lupus.


Good luck with your wife!
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:36:57 AM EST


Beatings. Many of them.


Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:37:29 AM EST
tell her she can only get aids once
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:38:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By Khemist:
Wait until she gets fibromyalgia, followed by chronic fatique syndrome, followed by Epstein Barr virus, followed by Lupus.


Good luck with your wife!


You just described my Mom. A lifetime of never-ending, difficult to diagnose and impossible to treat problems that are largely in her head. Death will be a sweet release for her. For all of us, actually.

Ed
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:39:33 AM EST
Originally Posted By bigmoney327:
i majored in psych in college, but i'm not really qualified to make any type of diagnosis, but it doesn't sound like the's a hypochondriac. from a pop pscyhology standpoint, it would seem as though she fits the bill, but usually for a clinical diagnosis of something like this, i always understood that it had to be severe. at this point, it's just costing you money that you don't have, and from what you said, it seems like this wouldn't be as big a deal if you had health insurance. from what i remember, it seems like diagnosable criteria for disorders (according to the DSM IV) usually require the symptoms of the problem to be a severe hindrance on everyday life (or something to that effect).

again, from the limited info you said, i'd say she's a worry-wart that needs to lighten up, but probably not a hypochondriac. just my $.02.


Well to be honest, it has become a hindrance due to missed work and frequent visits to the Dr for all these mystery illnesses. Every visit to the Dr results in a clean bill of health and a few hundred more dollars out of our checkbook. She is 38yrs old and healthy as a horse. She's pushed out 5 healthy kids with no complications.

Another telltale problem is the oldest (18yrs old)daughter... She is the exact same way as her Mother... I wish I had a nickel for every time I heard her say: "OMG, Mom... what if I'm dying?"
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:40:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By Epic_Ed:
A lifetime of never-ending, difficult to diagnose and impossible to treat problems that are largely in her head.
Ed


Perfect description of my wife.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:43:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
Originally Posted By bigmoney327:
i majored in psych in college, but i'm not really qualified to make any type of diagnosis, but it doesn't sound like the's a hypochondriac. from a pop pscyhology standpoint, it would seem as though she fits the bill, but usually for a clinical diagnosis of something like this, i always understood that it had to be severe. at this point, it's just costing you money that you don't have, and from what you said, it seems like this wouldn't be as big a deal if you had health insurance. from what i remember, it seems like diagnosable criteria for disorders (according to the DSM IV) usually require the symptoms of the problem to be a severe hindrance on everyday life (or something to that effect).

again, from the limited info you said, i'd say she's a worry-wart that needs to lighten up, but probably not a hypochondriac. just my $.02.


Well to be honest, it has become a hindrance due to missed work and frequent visits to the Dr for all these mystery illnesses. Every visit to the Dr results in a clean bill of health and a few hundred more dollars out of our checkbook. She is 38yrs old and healthy as a horse. She's pushed out 5 healthy kids with no complications.

Another telltale problem is the oldest (18yrs old)daughter... She is the exact same way as her Mother... I wish I had a nickel for every time I heard her say: "OMG, Mom... what if I'm dying?"


well, next time, instead of her going to your general practitioner, send her to a psychiatrist
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:44:10 AM EST
Wait until she finds some nice doctor who will be glad to play along. Cha-ching.

Don't worry, your pharmacist will also get in on that sweet, crazy action.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:45:24 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:03:41 AM EST
I don't think she is a hypochondriac, she does this because she craves attention, and has low self esteem. The first Mrs. Winmag had a mother that was this way, and according to her, she did the same thing to her daughter until she put her foot down.

Ignoring her problem is not the answer. The reason she goes to the doctor, is because she perceives everyone else ignoring her problem. The doctor won't or he will lose a patient, or get sued, when there is a real problem.

How do you deal with this? You need to convince her that everyone has these types of pains, and problems, and people live through them all the time. People who say, "What if I'm dying?" are really craving attention. You should probably give them some attention, but not the kind they want. Tell her to go tell the kids you are dying and won't be here in 6 months. Ask her if she wants to go pick out a casket.

Use your head. People aren't that hard to figure out.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:11:57 AM EST
Put your foot down on her head ( figure of speech) and tell her she is fine and to snap out of it or your life will become a living HELL.
If you continue to play along, She will feed off the attention like a Zombie on brains.
My Mother has managed to almost destroy our entire family pulling this shit for the past 20 years.
My Dad never put his foot down. I have NO respect for my Mother and very little for my Father for allowing it.

She needs to know you mean it when you tell her that you will NO LONGER Tolerate her pathetic excuses, and that is exactly what it is.

Then work on your Husband and Wife relationship. Her actions are a pathetic way of trying to get yours or her kids attention.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:14:22 AM EST
Good smack to the face?

Some people really need it, others with real problems can't be helped if they don't want it. Self-help books, psychiatrist, therapy if needed are generally the first options.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:23:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2009 10:33:50 AM EST by RASuperlight]
If she hasn't already started it. Next it will be the once or twice a week visits to Various different Psychiatrist until she finds the one that tells her she was or IS a VICTIM and then she is LOST.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:48:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2009 10:48:33 AM EST by Dragracer_Art]
A copy n paste from Wiki... highlighted in RED are things directly related to or complaints from my wife.


Hypochondriasis (or hypochondria, often referred to as health phobia) refers to an excessive preoccupation or worry about having a serious illness. Often, hypochondria persists even after a physician has evaluated a person and reassured them that their concerns about symptoms do not have an underlying medical basis or, if there is a medical illness, the concerns are far in excess of what is appropriate for the level of disease. Many people suffering from this disorder focus on a particular symptom as the catalyst of their worrying, such as gastro-intestinal problems, palpitations, or muscle fatigue.

The DSM-IV-TR defines this disorder, “Hypochondriasis,” as a somatoform disorder[1] and one study has shown it to affect about 3% of the visitors to primary care settings.[2]

Hypochondria is often characterized by fears that minor bodily symptoms may indicate a serious illness, constant self-examination and self-diagnosis, and a preoccupation with one's body. Many individuals with hypochondriasis express doubt and disbelief in the doctors' diagnosis, and report that doctors’ reassurance about an absence of a serious medical condition is unconvincing, or un-lasting. Many hypochondriacs require constant reassurance, either from doctors, family, or friends, and the disorder can become a disabling torment for the individual with hypochondriasis, as well as his or her family and friends. Some hypochondriacal individuals are completely avoidant of any reminder of illness, whereas others are frequent visitors of doctors’ offices. Other hypochondriacs will never speak about their terror, convinced that their fear of having a serious illness will not be taken seriously by those in whom they confide.

Manifestation and comorbidity
Hypochondriasis manifests in various ways. Some people have numerous intrusive thoughts and physical sensations that push them to check with family, friends and physicians. Other people are so afraid of any reminder of illness that they will avoid medical professionals for a seemingly minor problem, sometimes to the point of becoming neglectful of their health when a serious condition may exist and go undiagnosed. Again, some people are afraid of getting a disease because they have a disease. Yet, some others live in despair and depression, certain that they have a life-threatening disease and no physician can help them, considering the disease as a punishment for past misdeeds. [3]

Hypochondriasis is often accompanied by other psychological disorders. Clinical depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (also known as OCD), phobias and somatization disorder are the most common accompanying conditions in people with hypochondriasis, as well as a generalized anxiety disorder diagnosis at some point in their life. [4]

Many people with hypochondriasis experience a cycle of intrusive thoughts followed by compulsive checking, which is very similar to the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, while people with hypochondriasis are afraid of having an illness, patients with OCD worry about getting an illness or of transmitting an illness to others. [3] Although some people might have both, these are distinct conditions.

Patients with hypochondriasis often are not aware that depression and anxiety produce their own physical symptoms that might be mistaken for signs of a serious medical disease. For example, people with depression often experience changes in appetite and weight fluctuation, fatigue, decreased interest in sex and motivation in life overall. Intense anxiety is associated with rapid heart beat, palpitations, sweating, muscle tension, stomach discomfort, and numbness or tingling in certain parts of the body (hands, forehead, etc.)[citation needed]

[edit] Factors contributing to hypochondria
Cyberchondria is a colloquial term for hypochondria in individuals who have researched medical conditions on the Internet. The media and the Internet often contribute to hypochondria, as articles, TV shows and advertisements regarding serious illnesses such as cancer and multiple sclerosis (some of the diseases hypochondriacs commonly think they have) often portray these diseases as being random, obscure and somewhat inevitable. Inaccurate portrayal of risk and the identification of non-specific symptoms as signs of serious illness contribute to exacerbating the hypochondriac’s fear that they actually have that illness.

Major disease outbreaks or predicted pandemics can also contribute to hypochondria. Statistics regarding certain illnesses, such as cancer, will give hypochondriacs the illusion that they are more likely to develop the disease. A simple suggestion of mental illness can often trigger one with hypochondria to obsess over the possibility.

It is common for serious illnesses or deaths of family members or friends to trigger hypochondria in certain individuals. Similarly, when approaching the age of a parent's premature death from disease, many otherwise healthy, happy individuals fall prey to hypochondria. These individuals believe they are suffering from the same disease that caused their parent's death, sometimes causing panic attacks with corresponding symptoms.

A majority of people who experience physical pains or anxieties over non-existent ailments are not actually "faking it", but rather, experience the natural results of other emotional issues, such as very high amounts of stress.

“ Grief that finds no vent in tears makes other organs weep. ”
—Dr. Henry Maudsley, British psychiatrist


Family studies of hypochondriasis do not show a genetic transmission of the disorder. Among relatives of people suffering from hypochondriasis only somatization disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were more common than in average families. [3] Other studies have shown that the first degree relatives of patients with OCD have a higher than expected frequency of a somatoform disorder (either hypochondriasis or body dysmorphic disorder).[5]

Some anxieties and depressions are believed to be mediated by problems with brain chemicals such as serotonin and norepinephrine. The physical symptoms that people with anxiety or depression feel are indeed real bodily symptoms, and are believed to be triggered by neurochemical changes. For example, too much norepinephrine will result in severe panic attacks with symptoms of increased heart rate and sweating, shortness of breath, and fear. Too little serotonin can result in severe depression, accompanied by a sleep disturbance, severe fatigue, and typically is treatable with medical intervention.[citation needed]

[edit] Treatment
If a person is sick with a medical disease such as diabetes or arthritis, there will often be psychological consequences, such as depression. Some even report being suicidal. In the same way, someone with psychological issues such as depression or anxiety will sometimes experience physical manifestations of these affective fluctuations, often in the form of medically unexplained symptoms. Common symptoms include headaches; abdominal, back, joint, rectal, or urinary pain; nausea; itching; diarrhea; dizziness; or balance problems. Many people with hypochondriasis accompanied by medically unexplained symptoms feel they are not understood by their physicians, and are frustrated by their doctors’ repeated failure to provide symptom relief. Common to the different approaches to the treatment of hypochondriasis is the effort to help each patient find a better way to overcome the way his/her medically unexplained symptoms and illness concerns rule her/his life. Current research makes clear that this excessive worry can be helped by either appropriate medicine or targeted psychotherapy.

Recent scientific studies have shown that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; e.g., fluoxetine and paroxetine) are effective treatment options for hypochondriasis as demonstrated in clinical trials.[6][7][9][10] CBT, a psycho-educational “talk” therapy, helps the worrier to address and cope with bothersome physical symptoms and illness worries and is found helpful in reducing the intensity and frequency of troubling bodily symptoms. SSRIs can reduce obsessive worry through readjusting neurotransmitter levels and have been shown to be effective as treatments for anxiety and depression as well as for hypochondriasis.

In the United States, NIH-funded studies are now underway to compare different treatment approaches for hypochondriasis: a study in the New York City area[11] and a study in the Boston area.[12] In these studies, patients will be given one of four treatments: supportive therapy with fluoxetine, supportive therapy with placebo, cognitive behavior therapy, or cognitive behavior therapy with fluoxetine. For more information, visit the external links cited below.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:54:59 AM EST
Encourage her to work out. Get her some endorphins. Build her up a bit. Make her feel a need to be self-protecting and self-sufficient. She needs to see she is tough, and that she can push through some discomfort. Hopefully then she won't want to be sick, and won't want to allow minor, incidental stuff to slow her down.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 10:57:56 AM EST
here, direct her to this site

www.webmd.com
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 11:09:23 AM EST
maybe she just doesn't wnat to have sex with you?
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 11:13:51 AM EST
It's not just her problem if you have kids. Google Munchausen by Proxy.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 11:18:13 AM EST
Well I can tell you what not to do. Never try to top them. One time after halloween I poured a bunch of fake blood in the toilet to fuck with my sister who is a hypochondriac. Long story short they always try to out do you.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 11:40:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By keroppl:
here, direct her to this site

www.webmd.com



Yeah. A few hours poking around there and she won't sleep for days.


Seriously, I don't know how to break the cycle she is in. My Mother was the same way. She ended up on so many drugs that her health worries became real. She found a doctor that would throw pills at her just to get her out of the exam room, and her ailments grew by leaps and bounds.

What she really needed was mental health care, and counselling, but she refused to see anyone who was going to label her as "crazy". It did not end well.

Best of luck finding a way to turn her around.
Maybe one of her girlfriends could make her see the pattern she has established?
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 11:53:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By Epic_Ed:
Originally Posted By Khemist:
Wait until she gets fibromyalgia, followed by chronic fatique syndrome, followed by Epstein Barr virus, followed by Lupus.


Good luck with your wife!


You just described my Mom. A lifetime of never-ending, difficult to diagnose and impossible to treat problems that are largely in her head. Death will be a sweet release for her. For all of us, actually.

Ed


I wish fibromyalgia were just in my head
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 12:25:46 PM EST
a week alone in the wilderness should cure it.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 12:39:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By AR-10:
Originally Posted By keroppl:
here, direct her to this site

www.webmd.com



Yeah. A few hours poking around there and she won't sleep for days.


Seriously, I don't know how to break the cycle she is in. My Mother was the same way. She ended up on so many drugs that her health worries became real. She found a doctor that would throw pills at her just to get her out of the exam room, and her ailments grew by leaps and bounds.

What she really needed was mental health care, and counselling, but she refused to see anyone who was going to label her as "crazy". It did not end well.

Best of luck finding a way to turn her around.
Maybe one of her girlfriends could make her see the pattern she has established?


i think this is a major problem with women
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 12:50:09 PM EST
Whenever anyone in my family complains of any type of illness I always diagnose it as aids.

Sore throat? That is neck aids. Nausea? That is stomach aids... and so on.

Try using my medical theory to make her feel better.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 1:02:29 PM EST
Dont confuse hypochondriasis with attention seeking behaviors.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 1:10:54 PM EST
My sister is a hypochondriac...

It's bad to the point that if she ever has anything that is truly life-threatening, she will probably have to die before I will become truly concerned.

She has some malady every month, and at least one surgery a year.

How do these people find doctors to play their games???



Link Posted: 11/4/2009 1:47:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By Schadenfreuda:
My sister is a hypochondriac...

It's bad to the point that if she ever has anything that is truly life-threatening, she will probably have to die before I will become truly concerned.

She has some malady every month, and at least one surgery a year.

How do these people find doctors to play their games???






There are allot of Doctors that are in it for the money A HypoC doesn't have to look hard.

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