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Posted: 9/1/2004 8:53:15 PM EST
How many jumps before I get it out of my system?

And, since someone has offered to finance the rest of AFF for me (read: they're paying!)

How much of it should I do in a day? I've done the level-1 jump. 6 jumps to go. How many should I make saturday?
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 8:55:39 PM EST
What's it cost to sky dive? Thats just one of those things that looks expensive....
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 9:05:24 PM EST
Where I've been going, I think it's:

$175 for the first (tandem) jump


Then, for Accelereated Free-Fall school, it's:

$75 for ground school
$175 each, for the next 4 jumps
$150 each, for the next 3 jumps

That's $1400 for the first 8 jumps, and training, and whatnot.

After that, it's about $20 for the ride to 14,000', and $25 to rent a 'chute, gear, etc.

I'm hoping to buy a parachute of my own, though I know it's gonna take a while.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 9:08:12 PM EST
Thats not so bad then. I figured with all the expenses of flying an airplane it'd cost alot more.
Link Posted: 9/1/2004 9:13:29 PM EST

Originally Posted By Blue84S10:
Thats not so bad then. I figured with all the expenses of flying an airplane it'd cost alot more.



It probably costs double that in Ca.

The guy I've been jumping with...He has what is supposedly the fastest-climbing jump plane in the country, and it spends its winters, and some holidays, in California.

Matter of fact, I think he has it in CA this weekend, which means I'll get to ride in the Cessna.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 3:51:13 AM EST
bumped for the day shift....
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 4:02:09 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 4:23:29 AM EST


Originally Posted By arowneragain:
How many jumps before I get it out of my system?



I guess thats up to you.
For me it was after a few diffrent types of death. Plane wreck, bumping in free fall and equipment problems killed at least 3 people who had WAY more jumps than me. I took up rock climbing and found it just as relaxing and better in alot of ways.


And, since someone has offered to finance the rest of AFF for me (read: they're paying!)

How much of it should I do in a day? I've done the level-1 jump. 6 jumps to go. How many should I make saturday?



Start slow, 3 should be a BIG day for ya.Whats the hurry ? Its like dating one of the best parts is the beginning it gone so fast.
You can learn alot at the DZ dont be in such a hurry. Learn about the equipment ,yours and those around you . Learn from the mistakes of others.
Have you joined the union yet ?
The first jump is a blurr after that you should just start trying to perform 100% then about the 10th start trying to enjoy the smells.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 4:31:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By u-baddog:
For me it was after a few diffrent types of death. Plane wreck, bumping in free fall and equipment problems killed at least 3 people who had WAY more jumps than me. I took up rock climbing and found it just as relaxing and better in alot of ways.




If it doesn't bother you....do you mind detailing some of those accidents?

<---trying to learn what hazards to look for.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:24:41 AM EST
^bump^
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:28:41 AM EST
I had about eight or ten jumps back when I started - none of this fancy tandem stuff - just static line.

I thought it was cool, but I never got back into it. I think about taking it up again every once in a while, but I've never really gotten around to it - so I guess you could say I got it out of my system.

(but since I only did static line - and this was back in the day of round chutes - I'm probably not really the experience you're looking for)
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 8:12:55 AM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
I had about eight or ten jumps back when I started - none of this fancy tandem stuff - just static line.

I thought it was cool, but I never got back into it. I think about taking it up again every once in a while, but I've never really gotten around to it - so I guess you could say I got it out of my system.

(but since I only did static line - and this was back in the day of round chutes - I'm probably not really the experience you're looking for)



Round chutes? when was that?
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:03:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 9:04:08 AM EST by DK-Prof]

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Round chutes? when was that?




What were they called - T10 chutes or something like that? This was a small club back in the mid 1980s in Denmark.


They were round (not the cool rectangular ones) and had two L-shaped cutouts in the back that allowed you to control decent and direction (to a point) with the two hand lines. However, they had nowhere the amount of lift of the more modern rectangular ones, and the impact was still pretty hard when you hit the ground.

Don't the military still use these?
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:05:45 AM EST
I don't think so...I'm waiting for FreeFall to weigh in here....he'll just rub it in about how he gets to jump from twice the altitude I do.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:06:42 AM EST
I guess this would have to be asked of the "experienced skydivers" because the "in-experienced skydivers" wouldn't be here to offer advice?
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:19:01 AM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Round chutes? when was that?




What were they called - T10 chutes or something like that? This was a small club back in the mid 1980s in Denmark.


They were round (not the cool rectangular ones) and had two L-shaped cutouts in the back that allowed you to control decent and direction (to a point) with the two hand lines. However, they had nowhere the amount of lift of the more modern rectangular ones, and the impact was still pretty hard when you hit the ground.



Don't the military still use these?



I busted my ASS hard jumping those damned things. Broke my leg in 23 places. The 70 square feet they cut out to help you 'steer' only spun you around on your x-axis (rotated you). They didn't help 'steer' but they did drop you a hell of a lot faster.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:22:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:

What were they called - T10 chutes or something like that? This was a small club back in the mid 1980s in Denmark.


They were round (not the cool rectangular ones) and had two L-shaped cutouts in the back that allowed you to control decent and direction (to a point) with the two hand lines. However, they had nowhere the amount of lift of the more modern rectangular ones, and the impact was still pretty hard when you hit the ground.



Don't the military still use these?



I busted my ASS hard jumping those damned things. Broke my leg in 23 places. The 70 square feet they cut out to help you 'steer' only spun you around on your x-axis (rotated you). They didn't help 'steer' but they did drop you a hell of a lot faster.



I thought they had a LITTLE lift - so that if you rotated into the wind, and yanked down hard on both lines right before you hit the ground, it slowed you just a smidge.

But yeah - my implying "steering" was defnitely an overstatement - I remember some very hard landings, even wiht my very limited experience. (We'd practice for landings by jumping off the roof of a small house - to pratice the impact and rolling with it).
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 9:55:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
But yeah - my implying "steering" was defnitely an overstatement - I remember some very hard landings, even wiht my very limited experience. (We'd practice for landings by jumping off the roof of a small house - to pratice the impact and rolling with it).



I would equate jumping off a two or three story building with nothing to trying to perform a PLF with a T10, especially when the DZ was at high altitudes (like 7K feet above sea level). That would be comparable for sure.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:16:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/2/2004 10:35:03 AM EST by u-baddog]

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Originally Posted By u-baddog:
For me it was after a few diffrent types of death. Plane wreck, bumping in free fall and equipment problems killed at least 3 people who had WAY more jumps than me. I took up rock climbing and found it just as relaxing and better in alot of ways.




If it doesn't bother you....do you mind detailing some of those accidents?

<---trying to learn what hazards to look for.



Dont mind at all

Plane crashed on take off 100 ft off the deck killed all on board. Engine failed

Two very experinced miltary guys were fun jumping. They were practicing linking up and one of them got knocked out and burned in.

Another military guy fun jumping just burned in. Pulled too low and never fully deployed . I never found out what really happened.

Speed jumping and hit a tree.

Except for the plane crash the dead jumpers had HUNDREDS if not in the thousands of jumps day and night.

www.uspa.org/ You should join up. Help support your sport and get the magazine. The magazine is worth joining for.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 10:44:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By thompsondd:

Originally Posted By DK-Prof:
But yeah - my implying "steering" was defnitely an overstatement - I remember some very hard landings, even wiht my very limited experience. (We'd practice for landings by jumping off the roof of a small house - to pratice the impact and rolling with it).



I would equate jumping off a two or three story building with nothing to trying to perform a PLF with a T10, especially when the DZ was at high altitudes (like 7K feet above sea level). That would be comparable for sure.



DK-Prof, You would be shocked at how easy they have it now a days. The squares sport chutes of today are like driving a Vett complared to the T10 . The round chutes of yesterday are akin to driving a dump truck with no steering or brakes.

I jumped a T10 for awhile. The term steering really meant just being able to spin around so you could face what you were going to run into.

Link Posted: 9/2/2004 11:10:49 AM EST
I made three jumps in 1975. We used the round chutes. There is no bigger Adreneline rush that I have ever experienced. Unfortunately I broke my leg on the third jump. I intended to continue jumping after my leg healed. However, after repeatedly waking up from dreams where I was falling I decided three was enough.

This was the time where the high performance chutes were just being developed. One of my friends jumped a triangular canopy. Was named a delta three or something similar. The nick name was "death trap. They were notorious for getting tangled in their lines. Lots of people bounced using these canopies.

Steve
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 2:56:13 PM EST
To answer your question, I quit after just over 3600 jumps & still hadn't had enough. Worst injury was a sprained ankle. I started in the days of T-10s, but these are museum pieces in today's sport jumping. The new canopies can give you a feather soft landing. Build up some speed with a LITTLE turn, flair to a glide & put your feet down when the speed bleeds off. The descent rate is zero or negative. One of the more common causes of fatalities is doing a BIG turn too low to recover & screwing yourself into the ground. Only a little stupidity can end a skydiving career or worse. As with most sports involving speed, skydiving is a safe as you make it & is a real blast. As the saying goes, there are old skydivers and bold skydivers, but there are no old, bold skydivers.
Why did I quit? Wife, house, job, not enough time to stay current (a big part of staying safe).
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 5:23:22 PM EST
Ok, here's another question....is there anything actually wrong with high-altitude deployment?

Not every time, but it seems like once in a while it would be nice to have a really long time under canopy to plat around, enjoy the scenery, etc.....
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:34:14 PM EST
?
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:39:25 PM EST
there is no cure for skydiving, it's like BRD.. no cure!

Blue Skys!!
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:45:17 PM EST

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Ok, here's another question....is there anything actually wrong with high-altitude deployment?

Not every time, but it seems like once in a while it would be nice to have a really long time under canopy to plat around, enjoy the scenery, etc.....




No, but we're really here for the freefall. What you're talking about is done all the time.

If its in your system, it never leaves. If you're talking about the fear, I have almost ten thousand jumps and I still get scared. Dying isnt fun, I think.
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 6:51:14 PM EST
There's really not much fear for me.....last weekend, I was much calmer, and yeah, I actually thought about dying before I jumped....But I'm still excited about going again saturday. very excited.

I'm sort of obsessive-compulsive, and I'm just wondering if the urge will go away eventually....I guess time will tell.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 2:55:42 AM EST
can't have a skydiving topic w/o pictures!




this is over Yolo County Airport, PRK
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