Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/8/2005 6:43:14 PM EDT
check this out, hard to believe.

www.lubedev.com/smartgas/faq.htm


Looking for some engineering or chemical opinions.


TXL
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:43:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:47:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:





well, thank you for that expert opinion.





I think it might be too, but did you read the faq?

I know it's the internet, and you can put up a site that says anything...
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:49:12 PM EDT
you can add toulene to jump up yer octane value.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:51:34 PM EDT
THe FAQ told you NOTHING. Just made some claims.


an octane booster would work with a car where you adjust the timing - but that's not modern cars.


extra octane does no good in a modern vehicle.


acetone is pretty volatile. It vapors off pretty easy.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:52:41 PM EDT
Damn, I hate to do it but.......dupe

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=387879
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:53:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:



+2
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 6:56:02 PM EDT
have you thought about adding a sail?
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:08:41 PM EDT
Gasoline formulations are very complex and the industry spends millions developing the best formulations for economy and the environment. There are hundreds of Ph.D.s in the field publishing their work in dozens of peer-reviewed journals.

Acetone is one of many organic chemicals commonly added to gasoline. Acetone is a polar, aprotic, hydroscopic molecule that could, in small concentrations, drastically affect the volatility, and aspiration properties of gasoline. Increased volatility due to lowering cohesive forces within gasoline would help the fuel-air mixture burn more efficiently.

I add a mixture of organic solvents to my gas for a variety of reasons. I also make my own biodiesel. But since I'm a geek of the nth order, I mostly do these things because, well, I'm a nerd and these are the kind of things we do.

I have seen great results in adding 3 oz of acetone to 15 gal. of gas in my Jeep CJ and in my 94 Honda Accord 4 cyl VTEC. My wife's 01 Accord V6 saw no change in mileage when adding acetone.

Kindstranger
Ph.D. organic chemistry
amatuer redneck
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:25:17 PM EDT

extra octane does no good in a modern vehicle.

That's not always true. Not nearly always. With all cars with OBD-II, the computer will retard the timing if it detects predetenation (spark-knocking). An employee that was playing with a scantool noticed that on our Chevy's the timing would retard when the engine was hot when running 87 octane. If the computer is retarding the timing, then extra octane will help. Period. When we ran 89 octane, it didn't happen. The trucks got better gas mileage and had more power. The scantool showed that the timing was no longer being retarded. We started putting mid-grade 89 octane in all of our vehicles. In the summer months here in SC, the gas mileage improved by more than 10%. We spend a lot of money on gas, so that made a big difference.

Also, my two great-nephews and the owner of the company's son have 2000 Corvettes. When the engines are hot and the humidity is high, the computer will retard the timing even with 93 octane so much that it is easily noticeable when in sixth gear. Those cars are geared so high that the car barely has enough power to make it up small hills in sixth gear when going between about 55 and 65MPH. With 93 octane and the timing retarded, you'd have to downshift when going up a slight hill. With 93 octane plus a little toulene in the tank, the computer stopped retarding the timing. It is a night and day difference for those cars at 55MPH in sixth gear. Between two of them, I've driven about 40,000 total miles on the hills of I-26 between Asheville, NC and Columbia, SC, and running higher than 93 octane gas makes the drive much more enjoyable. It made a huge difference in this specific application.z
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:29:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kindstranger:
. . .
Acetone is one of many organic chemicals commonly added to gasoline. Acetone is a polar, aprotic, hydroscopic molecule that could, in small concentrations, drastically affect the volatility, and aspiration properties of gasoline. Increased volatility due to lowering cohesive forces within gasoline would help the fuel-air mixture burn more efficiently. . . .

Kindstranger
Ph.D. organic chemistry
amatuer redneck



I think that's hygroscopic, Mr. Ph.D. Just busting your balls.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:37:57 PM EDT
If you really want to improve your gas mileage, go check the pressure in your tires. Check your air filter too while you're at it.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:40:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexRdnec:
have you thought about adding a sail?



Sail...

How's about:











Link Posted: 9/8/2005 7:53:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:
Damn, I hate to do it but.......dupe

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=387879




DAMN, I don't even know why I start new topics anymore.

shit

Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:08:23 PM EDT
back in the day, i was taught to add acetone to your tank if you had water in it (supposedly would mix with and burn the water) ,,,,,,, never tried it

but i have added pepper to the radiator, to stop a pin hole leak, until i could replace it,, that worked!!
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 8:17:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By kindstranger:
. . .
Acetone is one of many organic chemicals commonly added to gasoline. Acetone is a polar, aprotic, hydroscopic molecule that could, in small concentrations, drastically affect the volatility, and aspiration properties of gasoline. Increased volatility due to lowering cohesive forces within gasoline would help the fuel-air mixture burn more efficiently. . . .

Kindstranger
Ph.D. organic chemistry
amatuer redneck



I think that's hygroscopic, Mr. Ph.D. Just busting your balls.



Hydrophilic
Hydrophobic
­Hygroscopic

That coulda been really em-bare-ass-ing under different circumstances...

Us chemists are known for butchery of the written and spoken word, even our own.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 1:53:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kindstranger:

Originally Posted By C-4:

Originally Posted By kindstranger:
. . .
Acetone is one of many organic chemicals commonly added to gasoline. Acetone is a polar, aprotic, hydroscopic molecule that could, in small concentrations, drastically affect the volatility, and aspiration properties of gasoline. Increased volatility due to lowering cohesive forces within gasoline would help the fuel-air mixture burn more efficiently. . . .

Kindstranger
Ph.D. organic chemistry
amatuer redneck



I think that's hygroscopic, Mr. Ph.D. Just busting your balls.



Hydrophilic
Hydrophobic
­Hygroscopic

That coulda been really em-bare-ass-ing under different circumstances...

Us chemists are known for butchery of the written and spoken word, even our own.



I have a B.Sc. in chemistry and do my share of the butchering. Still do.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 2:10:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:
Damn, I hate to do it but.......dupe

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=387879



dupe
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 2:19:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fight4yourrights:
THe FAQ told you NOTHING. Just made some claims.


an octane booster would work with a car where you adjust the timing - but that's not modern cars.


extra octane does no good in a modern vehicle.


acetone is pretty volatile. It vapors off pretty easy.



High compression engines benefit greatly from higher octane.
Link Posted: 9/9/2005 3:40:41 PM EDT
There was a great magazine called Aviation Heritage or something similar, where they listed all of the different fuel combos the Bendix racers used for their aircraft. Methanol, xylene, it was list that took up one 8.5X11 page. There was also a fairly large list of anti-knock agents, but of course the overall best was tetraethyl lead.

Unless you enjoy alchemy as a hobby, you would possibly be better served by driving your current rig to the end of its service life with you and then going to a more efficient rig.

Link Posted: 9/9/2005 4:01:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ctprelude:

High compression engines benefit greatly from higher octane.



Low compression forced induction engines also greatly benefit from higher octane. With some 116 octane leaded race gas and the proper tune I can see as much as a 100hp increase, along with lower exhaust gas temps, cleaner combustion chambers, and a nice white residue that forms in the exhaust.


Lower EGTs = less detonation = richer = more boost to lean out mix = more hp = big shit eating grin.
Top Top