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Posted: 12/19/2009 7:21:50 PM EDT
Ok here's the situation.

My dog is about 25 pounds. A schnauzer mixed breed. Not really sure since she was adopted.

Anyways, we came home tonight, and I immediately felt like a dumbass when I saw candy wrappers all over the floor. We counted about 6 bags of M&Ms and 6 Hershey bar wrappers. A coupe twizzlers were thrown in there too, maybe 2-3.

I didn't know the weight of the items so I got some unopened ones and weighed them on the reloading scale.. .they measure about 0.5 ounces each.

Will my dog be OK? I'm going to monitor her all night. Is there anything I can give her to help her be OK?
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 7:25:00 PM EDT
That sounds like a bit much for a 25-ish pound dog..

I don't have my book or would look up if peroxide is the right thing to give to induce vomiting in that situation..



Do a search for the pet poison hotline - there is one.  They may be able to give you more information.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 7:26:28 PM EDT
I am not a vet and this is from a random google on the subject.











   







   




Chocolate Toxicity in Dogs








      We've all heard it, "Don't give your dog chocolate it will
kill him".
 We'll how true is it you're probably wondering. Do I
have to rush him to an emergency vet if he ate one of my M&M's?




 

The truth is chocolate contains theobromine that is toxic to dogs in
sufficient quantities. This is a xanthine compound in the same family of
caffeine, and theophylline.



       

Toxic Levels




The good news is that it takes, on average, a fairly large amount of
theobromine 100-150 mg/kg to cause a toxic reaction. Although there are
variables to consider like the individual sensitivity, animal size and
chocolate concentration.





On average,

Milk chocolate contains 44 mg of theobromine per
oz.

Semisweet chocolate contains 150mg/oz.

Baker's
chocolate
390mg/oz.





Using a dose of 100 mg/kg as the toxic dose it comes out roughly as:

1
ounce per 1 pound of body weight for Milk chocolate

1 ounce
per 3 pounds of body weight
for Semisweet chocolate

1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight
for Baker's chocolate.



So, for example, 2 oz. of Baker's
chocolate can cause great risk to an 15 lb. dog. Yet, 2 oz. of Milk
chocolate usually will only cause digestive problems.





Clinical Signs



     

Xanthines affect the nervous system, cardiovascular system and
peripheral nerves. It has a
diuretic effect as well. Clinical signs:




Hyper excitability


Hyper irritability


Increased
heart rate


Restlessness


Increased urination


Muscle tremors


Vomiting


Diarrhea



       

Treatment



     

There is no specific antidote for this poisoning. And the half life of
the toxin is 17.5 hours in dogs. Induce vomiting in the first 1-2 hours
if the quantity is unknown. Administering activated charcoal may inhibit
absorption
of the toxin. An anticonvulsant might be indicated if neurological signs
are present and needs
to be controlled. Oxygen therapy, intravenous medications, and fluids
might be needed to protect
the heart.



       

Milk chocolate will often cause diarrhea 12-24 hours after ingestion.
This should be treated
symptomatically (fluids, etc..) to prevent dehydration.



       

If you suspect your pet has ingested chocolate contact your Vet
immediately! They can help you determine the the proper treatment for
your pet.


Link Posted: 12/19/2009 7:26:31 PM EDT
If it's not dark chocolate,  you probably don't have much to worry about except for a possible horrible mess on the living room rug by morning.



The issue is theobromine,  which is found in dark chocolate.  Less of it is in milk chocolate,  not enough to really worry about.



If your dog had eaten a lot of 95 percent dark chocolate,  you'd have reason to worry.  But milk chocolate's danger is vastly overrated.



CJ


Link Posted: 12/19/2009 7:26:58 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2009 7:27:31 PM EDT by AnnaTrocity]
I'd watch her as that seems like a lot but milk chocolate isn't quite as potent as dark chocolate. Doesn't have the same concentrations of whatever chemical dogs can't process properly. Hope she does alright.

ETA

Damn you guys are fast, there was only two posts when I got here
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 7:49:07 PM EDT
I would call a vet an ask. Better safe than sorry.  You could give a tablespoon of peroxide.  That should induce vomiting and keep of from absorbing more, but if it was me, I would want to talk to a vet and know for sure.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 7:53:54 PM EDT
A vet once told me to give my dog several tablespoons of table salt to induce vomiting.  You will need to hold your dogs mouth open and force them to swallow it, but it works.


Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:00:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2009 8:01:44 PM EDT by Aiden]
Originally Posted By 14TheKid:
A vet once told me to give my dog several tablespoons of table salt to induce vomiting.  You will need to hold your dogs mouth open and force them to swallow it, but it works.




I've got a JRT, and he used to get into everything.  I'd give a couple tablespoons of peroxide, it's what the vets always told me to do when Steve ate stuff he wasn't supposed to.

ETA:  Do this outside, cause' the dog will puke some nasty foamy stuff.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:01:52 PM EDT
My dog loves chocolate.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:04:18 PM EDT
Yep my dad feeds his dog oreo's  ... lol


Originally Posted By Dragracer:


My dog loves chocolate.






 
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:04:22 PM EDT
As already said, if you're concerned, pour some peroxide down its throat and it will throw it up.

It should be okay though. Just gonna make a mess later.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:05:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Aiden:
Originally Posted By 14TheKid:
A vet once told me to give my dog several tablespoons of table salt to induce vomiting.  You will need to hold your dogs mouth open and force them to swallow it, but it works.




I've got a JRT, and he used to get into everything.  I'd give a couple tablespoons of peroxide, it's what the vets always told me to do when Steve ate stuff he wasn't supposed to.

ETA:  Do this outside, cause' the dog will puke some nasty foamy stuff.


+1 on the peroxide. My 15lb dog ate a halloween pack of Reeses Peanut Butter Cups. I called the vet and explained the situation, they said bring him in. Shot some peroxide down his throat, walked him around, and within 5 minutes he was throwing up chocolate, foam and orange wrappers.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:06:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2009 8:08:06 PM EDT by velocity]
My 15 pound weiner dog once ate a whole 5 pound milk chocolate bunny.  9 years later he's still a chocolate freak!

Alright, I ate the ears, so maybe 3-3.5lbs.
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:08:49 PM EDT
paging doctor hobbit
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 8:56:52 PM EDT
I'm not a vet but my dad is.



That means you are pretty much taking advice from the Holiday Inn Express guy.



Your dog will probably be fine.  Find the nearest 24 hour vet clinic to you and give them a call.  They will probably tell you to give the dog a little peroxide or kaopectate.  They might tell you something different.



Do whatever they tell you and keep a close eye on your dog.  Have a route ready to get to said clinic and have your car prepped to bug out to said place, if needed, which you probably won't.



After a day or two, once you know your dog is OK, make a donation or send a nice card to whatever place you called that helped you.

 
Link Posted: 12/19/2009 9:47:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/19/2009 9:48:27 PM EDT by imdandman]
Originally Posted By USMC88-93:
I am not a vet and this is from a random google on the subject.


   

   


Chocolate Toxicity in Dogs


      We've all heard it, "Don't give your dog chocolate it will kill him".  We'll how true is it you're probably wondering. Do I have to rush him to an emergency vet if he ate one of my M&M's?

 The truth is chocolate contains theobromine that is toxic to dogs in sufficient quantities. This is a xanthine compound in the same family of caffeine, and theophylline.

       Toxic Levels

The good news is that it takes, on average, a fairly large amount of theobromine 100-150 mg/kg to cause a toxic reaction. Although there are variables to consider like the individual sensitivity, animal size and chocolate concentration.

On average,
Milk chocolate contains 44 mg of theobromine per oz.
Semisweet chocolate contains 150mg/oz.
Baker'schocolate 390mg/oz.

Using a dose of 100 mg/kg as the toxic dose it comes out roughly as:
1 ounce per 1 pound of body weight for Milk chocolate
1 ounce per 3 pounds of body weightfor Semisweet chocolate
1 ounce per 9 pounds of body weight for Baker's chocolate.

So, for example, 2 oz. of Baker's chocolate can cause great risk to an 15 lb. dog. Yet, 2 oz. of Milk chocolate usually will only cause digestive problems.

Clinical Signs

      Xanthines affect the nervous system, cardiovascular system and peripheral nerves. It has a diuretic effect as well. Clinical signs:

Hyper excitability
Hyper irritability
Increasedheart rate
Restlessness
Increased urination
Muscle tremors
Vomiting
Diarrhea

       Treatment

      There is no specific antidote for this poisoning. And the half life of the toxin is 17.5 hours in dogs. Induce vomiting in the first 1-2 hoursif the quantity is unknown. Administering activated charcoal may inhibit absorptionof the toxin. An anticonvulsant might be indicated if neurological signs are present and needsto be controlled. Oxygen therapy, intravenous medications, and fluids might be needed to protect the heart.

       Milk chocolate will often cause diarrhea 12-24 hours after ingestion. This should be treatedsymptomatically (fluids, etc..) to prevent dehydration.

       If you suspect your pet has ingested chocolate contact your Vet immediately! They can help you determine the the proper treatment for your pet.


I've done a little research online and this is basically what I've found too. Since she is 25 pounds and she only ate about 6 ounces, she should be ok, right?

Everything else I've read says it's all absorbed after the first 2 hours of eating, and since we got home to find it already eaten, vomiting it up would be useless, right?

ETA: We're going to monitor her all night, just to be safe.
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 4:51:50 AM EDT
probably nothing will happen, my sister has a dog that ate my nieces Halloween candy and it didn't throw up, shit, or die. I don't know how much real chocolate is in any of those products, but probably not as much as you think.
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 11:47:59 AM EDT
our JRT ate about that much but his system rejected it behind a chair an hour later



Barfed up M&Ms in a soupy brown slurry FTW
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 11:52:21 AM EDT
Hope you have a good supply of paper towels.  My dog Lily ate a entire batch of double chocolate brownie cookies my daughter baked.  She puked and had explosive diarrhea for two days.  Good times!
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 11:58:37 AM EDT
I know this goes against all wisdom, but an old roommate of mine had a little 20 lb pug/boston terrier mix who ate about a quarter of a 10" diameter by 6" tall chocolate cake one night.  We were pretty sure she was going to die, but nothing happened.  At all.  No diarrhea, no puking, nothing.  Of course, this dog would also eat my roommates pastels on a regular basis and leave green and purple turds all over the back yard.
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 1:31:12 PM EDT
the toxicity comes from the chocolate



cakes have plenty of other fillers

(flour eggs sugar butter)
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:08:15 PM EDT
hell a 5lb box of chocolates didn't kill my mothers little dog (a taco bell type) course neither did the pack of birth control pills either.
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:15:04 PM EDT

meh

maybe keep an eye out for worms
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:18:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:29:29 PM EDT
Our platoon dogs in Afghanistan broke into a HUGE bag of M&Ms one night...they probably ate a couple pounds of chocolate each ..... no side effects that we noticed.  But they got to each chocolate after that
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:33:14 PM EDT
Be prepared for some ripe chocolate bunnies.

Doesn't seem like much to be that concerned about. Monitor the dog.
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:34:21 PM EDT
Unless it's the expensive chocolate made with a high % of cacao all he/she will have is a tummy ache.  Mike chocolate or white chocolate doesn't have a high % of the cacao bean should be ok in small volumes vs. the small weight of the dog.  
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:36:19 PM EDT
Put him outside before he hershey squirts all over your rugs.
Link Posted: 12/20/2009 2:51:37 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dragracer:
My dog loves chocolate.


Same here.  My insane border collie has eaten a HUGE Hershey Kiss (Foil and all) in one sitting, and has been known to eat Halloween candy by the bucket; wrapper and all.

Still alive and kicking.
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