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Posted: 1/5/2005 9:49:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: ajm1911]
I was just wondering if those who are/have been deployed could sound off with suggestions/evaluations of gear and accessories of all types to take on deployment. Includes tactical knives, weapons accessories, MWR items, baby wipes, pogie bait, etc that works and doesn't work. Thanks alot.
VP
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 9:56:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: mr_wilson] [#1]
FWIW, ya could just purchase a subscription to Soldier of Fortune magazine, as they have been running "What works and What don't" articles since the troops were first deployed to the sandbox.

Besides ain't this forum just for the deployed guys???????? (there is a Suggestions Forum, where this should probably appear)


Sorry for the response, as I ain't deployed,
Mike
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 10:17:12 AM EST
[#2]
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 7:56:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: ChrisLe] [#3]
Here's a few I've previously posted. They're geared towards medics, but there's info for all:

1. Always wear your issued ballistic goggles. You ‘should ‘get issued WileyX goggles with both clear and tinted lenses. If not, buy your own ballistic goggles before you go over. Wear them 24/7 when you’re outside your FOB. I can’t count the amount of people that lost eyes from IED attacks because they were not wearing their goggles. Wear them!!

2. Wear your SAPI plates! They have saved countless lives by stopping 7.62 rounds and huge chunks of shrapnel…They weigh a ton and you’ll sweat like a whore in church while wearing them but they will save your life.

3. Always keep your hands inside of the armor side plates when riding in the back of a HMMWV. The tendency to rest your weapon on the armor, pointing outboard, with your hand outstretched holding the barrel in the ready position is natural but extremely dangerous. If an IED hits, you WILL lose your arm….

4. Know your AO like the back of your hand. It’s the single most improtant way you will be able to identify IED’s before they get you. You will be traveling the same roads over and over again day after day. Do not sit in the HMMWV and jerk around while you’re out there. Memorize every dirt mound, light pole, stop sign, garbage pile, depression, car, etc in your AO. In time you will be able to ‘sense’ that there is something not right about a certain spot or object on the road. For example: We noticed one day that a stop sign in our AO was missing from an intersection. Miraculously, it reappeared the next day. BIG RED FLAG!! We stopped at a distance, circled around behind it, and found that they had removed it, lined the back of the sign with a ½ inch layer of plastic explosives with ball bearings embedded in it, and then replaced it on the pole. Had we not recognized that it was missing and then reappeared, and continued to drive by it, it would have decimated us as it was 6’ off the ground (head level above the level of a HMMWV’s armor plating). Know your AO!!

5. If you’re HMMWV has a fording stack, get rid of it ASAP. It impedes the passenger’s ability to scan the side of the road for abnormalities…

6. When traveling along the MSR’s be especially wary when you drive by villages. Many IED’s are located near villages that abut the MSR because it affords the insurgents numerous hiding spots from which to command detonate the IED.

7. Beg, borrow, or steal as many tourniquets as you can. Assign one to every member of your squad or unit, teach them how to use them, and be sure it’s carried on their person 24/7. There is no way to describe the carnage that an IED or a 122 mm rocket creates. They will tear off limbs in an instant and tourniquet may be the difference between life and death if arteries are severed. Even in your FOB, where you are constantly rocketed, one should carry tourniquets….
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 8:06:21 PM EST
[#4]
thanks Chris, that kinda stuff is invaluable. Thanks for your input
I'd also like to know about personal gear that people have tried that is better/replaces issue gear. Stuff as simple as like what brand of gloves does everyone use instead of the issue work gloves.
What hydration system works best, multitools, knives, socks, boots, weapon slings, all that stuff because there is no way any soldier has enough money to try out all the options on the money they make. Thanks again
Link Posted: 1/5/2005 9:49:17 PM EST
[#5]
tagged
Link Posted: 1/6/2005 4:58:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: ChrisLe] [#6]
Some personal observations on gear:

Gloves- The issued leather gloves are not conducive to the desert environment as they’re too thick and do not ‘breathe.’ Your hands will begin sweating almost immediately and the leather will stiffen as a result of the constant exposure to your sweat and the salt it contains. Many of my Marines bought hi-speed gloves (Hatch, Hell storm, etc) and they did not fare too well as they only lasted a month or two during hard use, especially considering how much they cost ($$$). I, on the other hand, decided to buy a half dozen pairs of the standard nomex flight gloves. Each pair lasted between one to two months. And as they became unusable, I just threw that pair out. They’re breathable, thin enough so as not to interfere with dexterity, they’re cheap, and they blend in with the environment.

Hydration Systems – the issued Camelback is not the greatest, but will definitely accomplish its intended purpose. My only suggestion, should you not wish to upgrade, is to buy some sort of on/off switch as they tend to leak. Also, a protective cover for the mouthpiece as it often finds itself in the sand.

Slings – Absolutely, positively ditch the issued two piece sling. Spend the money on a good assault sling; you will thank yourself in the long run…As to which is best? It’s a matter of personal preference, get together with a bunch of Arfcommers for a weekend shoot and try a few out (That’s what I did and ended up with an SOE sling).

Multitools – an absolute must. My personal preference is the Leatherman Wave, but there are dozens of other models that work just as well….

Socks- Ditch the issued socks ASAP. They are uncomfortable, retain water, and don’t last long. Avoid cotton socks like the plague as they retain moisture which results in blisters and fungus. Good socks to buy are synthetic wool socks as wool does not retain moisture and dries quickly. My personal preference would be the ‘light hiker’ type socks from manufacturers such as Thorlo, Smartwool, and Indian River. They are not cheap but well worth the cost….

Pistol Holsters – I’m a big advocate of drop-leg holsters as they’re more comfortable, easier to access, and allow you to doff your 782 gear without having to remove your pistol first (assuming it’s on the issued holster on your 782 gear). SOE and Blackhawk both make excellent drop-leg holsters, just be sure to order early (especially if you’re a lefty) as they’re often on backorder. Also, replace the issued lanyard with one of the ‘telephone cord’ type retention lanyards as the issued lanyard is stiff and very often catches on objects, door knobs, and other such obstructions….

Knife- I carried two; an automatic benchmade to open MRE’s   and a standard USMC KaBar for the heavy stuff….This decision would be personal preference….

Magazine Pouches: A butt stock mounted single mag pouch comes in real handy when you’re at your FOB or Base, as you’re required to always carry your weapon and a magazine. It’s much easier than carrying your 782 gear or putting it in your cargo pocket where it’s not as easy to access. Also, if you’re issued an M9, absolutely ditch the issued magazines (especially the Checkmates) and bring your own original Beretta mags. The issued mags are notorious for failing.

Cleaning Gear- A bore snake came in extremely handy for that ‘quick’ cleaning job between regular cleanings. Also, bring a dozen or so small 1” wide paintbrushes (chip brushes) as they’re excellent for brushing the sand off your weapon…….



Will add more at a later time…
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 11:32:09 AM EST
[#7]
Tag
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 10:26:20 AM EST
[Last Edit: Matt45] [#8]
First and foremost I am an 11B, but as an Armorer, I cover down under Supply. I have a list of NSN's that I used to get some "HighSpeed, LowDrag' stuff, the source for the cheat sheets were the 2nd Ranger PBO, and a few Aviation ALSCE shops on Ft Lewis. (Thanks Guys, you were a huge help, I owe ya.) I'll post the more critical/cool ones here y'all to give your supply section at a later date.

I'm focusing on the comfort stuff. Operation details is something you'll develop, but here's the biggest points to consider.
[rant] LISTEN to the personnel that have been here already. IED's Car bombs and random shots fired are a way of life, EVERYWHERE. The bottom line basics are muzzles out, eyes out, wear eye/ear and all the Kevlar protection you are offered.
You're NEVER really "Safe" here, it's just relative levels of danger. IF something looks, sounds feels suspicious, then it most likely IS. When the crowds and kids disappear, or traffic is below normal, YOU ARE ABOUT TO GET HIT.
Learn some Farsi, the DLI has excellent training aids, key words cards, and Audio Cd's available. Building rapport with the locals is paramount.
YOU HAVE TO HAVE BOOTS ON THE GROUND TO OWN IT, not just a daily mounted patrol whizzing by the populace. Buy fruit and veggies at the markets, ask questions, $2 USD at a vegetable stall can yield a lot of goodwill.
I ran LogPac missions for 5 months in an unarmored LMTV, with a scrapmetal armored 998 Hummer as a wingman, 35 kilometers each way, through "Unsecured" territory, twice a day. We were only seriously and directly hit twice, and both times we believe that was not specifically planned for us, and that we were were a target of opportunity. Do NOT be afraid to be aggressive, fire warning shots, point guns at people and generally act as if you will kill the next MF'r who gets in your way. Drive as if you mean it, and with a purpose. Follow your ROE, and your threat escalation. Don't cause unnecessary harm or injury, but don't be afraid to pull the damn trigger.
[/rant]
What worked for me:
Keep in mind that my unit is Mech Infantry and we've known in advance that we had a fixed site/FOB we would be assigned to for the duration of our deployment. What worked for us won't really work for units expected to live out of rucksacks for a year.

UnderArmor-Worth their weight in gold. I prefer the loose gear version.

Socks- The USMC over the calf type. By far the best, and very much the same as the RFI issued ones.

Gloves- Plain Jane thin black shooter's gloves OR Napa Mechanix gloves.

Tactical Tailor-Gets a big nod. The gear the sell works, works well, and is well designed. I prefer their ammo pouches over the MOLLE Issued one, as their Tactical Thigh holster for the 9mm is the best going.

CamelBack- The BlackHawk issued one SUCKS, as does the RFI issued one.

Battery Operated Lantern- Any D cell batt Op lantern will do. The generators often go out here, for a couple of hours/days at a time.

Pinch Light- By far the best $7 I've spent in a few years.

Multitool The issue Gerber is "OK", I prefer the Leatherman "Wave". Politics aside, I got mine through the supply system, but i would pay the bucks for one.

K-Bar can't beat the design, but for a gen purp blade, I was fortunate enough to secure a Benchmade Auto. Past that, spend the bucks and get a QUALITY 3" folder, that opens with one hand. Can't tell you how many El Cheapo $5-$35 I've seen fail or even better, cause the user harm when it did fail. A good Whetstone or Lansky Diamond hone/kit is also vital.

Trioxianene Tabs-I am a coffee fiend first thing in the AM. My boss won't even talk to me until I've had a cup. I've cooked Ramen and coffee in my canteen cup with heat tabs since before i came in the Army, and you just can't mess with a system that works....

Deep Woods OFF!-The chiggers, sand flea, and other bugs will eat your ass alive here in the spring. The flies with overwhelm you in the fall.

Rat and Mouse traps- Available in the supply system, units should bulk up on them.

Gel Hand Sanitizer- I've been "well" for most of the deployment, but am fanatical about washing/sanitizing my digits.

Folding chair- Since your living room will be "Wherever" for a year, you WILL need someplace to park your ass. I've been through 3 chairs, and this last one *might* make it.

Thumb Drive, Digital Camera-Invaluable. Don't bother with a film camera. Or an expensive one. the 3.3 MegaPixel Walmart Vivitar work great. There are also some good "deals" here on the street. More about that later.

GameBoy/Laptop-IF you bear the expense, they're well worth the investment. there are often L-O-N-G stretches with nothing to do.

Bottled Propane/Single burner Stove- With one small pot and frying pan, you can cook anything.

Breadmaker- No shit, there I was....seriously, one of the guys in my section received one the other month, and we wondered why we didn't think of it sooner. The bread mixes we are getting from home are ready to use with just water. HUGE morale booster since our chow is trucked in and sits in a mermite for 2-3 Hours before serving. Just fry up some Spam on the propane stove, Viola!

Ramen-I've been living on it for the better part of a year, my wife send a case of the Kimchi Bowl type every month. That and Tuna fish packages. I can get mayo and relish from the DFAC, crackers from the PX and MRE's.


I CANNOT STRESS THIS ENOUGH. EXPLAIN TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW, THAT WHILE YOU APPRECIATE SOAP, LAUNDRY POWDER, AND SUCH, TO PLEASE(!) SEND IT SEPERATE FROM FOODSTUFFS. I CANNOT TELL YOU HOW MANY TIDE-FLAVORED LIFESAVERS I'VE EATEN AND ZESTFULLY CLEAN BROWNIES SUCK BUTT.  

[rant]
The PX/AAFES is getting better about supporting our needs. If you can get to one. Balad, and BIAP(Including the Victory Camps) have very large well run, well supported facilities, and food courts. Baghdad, the Green Zone is so/so...

Now, there are "deals" here. Fake Rolexes, Persian rugs, pirated DVD's, X-box, PS2 & PC games. Anything 110 needs a converter, which is easily obtainable here, the 220V electricity here will fry anything 110 plugged into it. Just remember to haggle, EVERYTHING IS NEGOTIABLE HERE, the price stated is not what you are expected to pay. I always counter offer roughly 2/3's of what is asked. (Hell, I've offered 10% of the asking price and have paid it.)
The interpreter’s you inherit/hire are the BEST sources for most of the stuff, the street urchins will offer DVD's the going rate in Baghdad is $3 per disk.
A carton of Camels off the street are about $13, Marlboro Reds are $5 BUT, these are export versions, and take getting used to.
Snuff is often in short supply. PLAN on depending on folks back home to support your filthy, nasty habit. (I quit dipping and smoking...now I do one or the other.)
[/rant]

More stuff in the other deployed equipment thread.


Link Posted: 1/12/2005 11:48:51 AM EST
[#9]
Been here 12 months. Here my suggestions.

If you work on or near the perimeter, get a 4X-6X scope. You can see better what the locals are actually doing. Red dots are great for urban ops. Much faster on target.

Hesco Barriers have a Hesco brand Leatherman inside in case you lost yours. (If the REMFs haven't stolen it).

If you deal with the local workers on base, give them small gifts like cheap Jersey gloves to keep there hands warm. They tend to get real loyal to you if you show you care about them. Bring them Ice and water in the summer. Same reason.

Always go "Red" status (round in chamber, weapon on safe) when on or near the perimeter. Weird shit happens fast and you need to be ready.

SPF 45 sunblock in the summer. It has gotten so hot, I burned my bare hands on my own weapon. A sunburn while wearing tactical gear is no joke.

Learn some of the basic lingo and learn Arabic numbers. Helps to determine fake IDs. Example- 45 year old male with a birth date of 1990.

If something looks funny or suspicious. STOP THE ACTIVITY AND INVESTIGATE. I see guys walking past locals workers not wearing ID badges all the time. (How did the bomber get into the Mosul chow hall?)

Go ask your S4 how FOO money works and what you can use it for. It's much faster than getting a contract to get work done on the base.

I'll type more as they come to me. Forgive me if I repeat myself.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 4:31:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: Matt45] [#10]

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:
4. Know your AO like the back of your hand. It’s the single most improtant way you will be able to identify IED’s before they get you. You will be traveling the same roads over and over again day after day. Do not sit in the HMMWV and jerk around while you’re out there. Memorize every dirt mound, light pole, stop sign, garbage pile, depression, car, etc in your AO. In time you will be able to ‘sense’ that there is something not right about a certain spot or object on the road. For example: We noticed one day that a stop sign in our AO was missing from an intersection. Miraculously, it reappeared the next day. BIG RED FLAG!! We stopped at a distance, circled around behind it, and found that they had removed it, lined the back of the sign with a ½ inch layer of plastic explosives with ball bearings embedded in it, and then replaced it on the pole. Had we not recognized that it was missing and then reappeared, and continued to drive by it, it would have decimated us as it was 6’ off the ground (head level above the level of a HMMWV’s armor plating). Know your AO!!


+1
Platter charges are in fashion here, and cost less on the black market than a RPG round or a 155 round. Do the math folks.
We generally use the Brit method of 5 meter sweeps within the first 10 minutes of a stop, and circle 1 meter further per 2-3 minutes while halted. Amazing finds.....


NSN/NIIN Cheat Sheet as promised. Guys (and Gal's!) Bring these to your supply Sarge and he no longer has a good reason to NOT order stuff for you. When your unit gets it is a another story........
01-247-0362 15" GREEN CHEM LIGHT BX/5
01-265-0612 15" RED CHEM LIGHT BX/5
01-265-0614 15" BLUE CHEM LIGHT BX/5
01-265-0613 15" YELLOW CHEM LIGHT BX/5
01-247-0367 15" WHITE CHEM LIGHT BX/5
01-247-0366 15" IR CHEM LIGHT 3HR BX/5
01-445-3937 10" STANDING CHEM LIGHT BX/6
00-074-5122 TAPE 1" DK GREEN RO
00-890-9872 TAPE 1" OD RO
00-074-4961 TAPE 2" BLACK RO
00-074-5124 TAPE 2" DK GREEN RO
00-266-5016 TAPE 2" OD RO
00-074-4969 TAPE 2" RED RO
00-074-4963 TAPE 3" BLACK RO
00-074-5160 TAPE 3" DK GREEN RO
00-890-9874 TAPE 3" OD RO
00-074-4996 TAPE 3" RED RO
00-074-4954 TAPE 3" WHITE RO
00-074-5174 TAPE 4" DK GREEN RO
00-890-9875 TAPE 4" OD RO
00-074-5029 TAPE 4" RED RO
00-074-5178 TAPE 6" DK GREEN RO
7510-00-164-8893 CHALK, MARKING WHITE GR
5110-01-346-5341 Multitool, Folding Pocket EA
00-174-6865 PANEL MARKER VS-17 EA
00-240-2146 550 CORD WHITE SL
00-262-2019 550 CORD GREEN (400 yards) SL
00-261-9772 MIRROR PERSONNEL LRG EA
00-105-1252 MIRROR PERSONNEL SML EA
00-285-4299 BOTTLE VACUUM 2QT EA
00-634-6555 BOTTLE VACUUM 1QT EA
01-346-7462 PADLOCK BRASS SHANK COMBO) EA
01-346-4611 PADLOCK STEEL SHANK EA
00-089-3827 CAN, WATER 5 GAL EA
01-337-5269 CAN, FUEL 5 GAL EA
6230-01-502-4073 IR strobe EA
01-471-1024 TRUNK LOCKER EA
8465-01-465-2272 ADAPTER, K-BAR MOLLE (WOOD) $3.20
8465-01-465-2289 PACK, MAIN, MOLLE (WOOD) $71.15
8465-01-465-2088 PACK, PATROL, MOLLE (WOOD) $66.55
8465-01-465-2082 BELT UTILITY MOLLE (USMC) $22.08
8465-01-465-2070 POUCH UTILITY 100RND (WOOD) $10.80
8465-01-465-2080 SET, BUCKLES, MOLLE (USMC) $2.65
8465-01-465-2057 POUCH, RADIO MOLLE (WOOD) $13.25
8465-01-465-2158 PACK, FRAME, MOLLE (WOOD) $31.35
8465-01-491-7519 PACK, MAIN, MOLLE (DCU) $66.95
8465-01-491-7438 PACK, PATROL, MOLLE (DCU) $62.55
8465-01-491-7446 POUCH, RADIO MOLLE (DCU) $11.85
8465-01-491-7449 PACK, FRAME, MOLLE (USMC, DCU) $26.81
8465-01-491-7525 ADAPTER, K-BAR MOLLE (DCU) $2.70
8465-01-495-0054 POUCH, RADIO MOLLE (ARCTIC CAMO) $8.94
8465-01-495-0063 ADAPTER, K-BAR MOLLE (ARCTIC CAMO) $3.45
8465-01-494-9667 POUCH UTILITY 100RND(ARCTIC) $8.78
6532-01-446-2594 MOLLE medic vest $318.74
1005-01-371-4462 Shotgun 12 Gauge, Riot Type 250.00
1005-00-106-7788 Pistol .45 Cal, Automatic 147.00
6135-01-106-7740 BATT, FINGER LIGHT $0.07
6230-01-357-2175 FINGER LIGHT $30.06
8465-00-432-2073 CLIPBOARD, PILOT KNEE $139.82
5110-01-346-5341 MULTITOOL, GERBER $48.99
6230-01-411-8535 LIGHT, DISTRESS(AA BATTS) $88.50
6230-00-783-5713 AA DISTRESS LIGHT IR COVER
9330-00-618-7214 ACETATE, COMBAT, ADHESIVE $13.48
7210-00-935-6665 BLANKET CMBT, PLASTIC $5.96
7210-00-935-6666 BLANKET CMBT, TYPE II $6.45
7530-01-060-7511 MEMOBOOK, GREEN 3.5"X4.5"
6230-01-247-7549 MAG LIGHT, 3 D CELL $19.34
6230-01-353-4468 MINIMAG FLASHLIGHT AA $74.15
8345-00-174-6865 VS-17 PANEL $19.60
8315-01-222-0680 SAW KIT $9.50
9390-00-481-3424 GLET TAPE (IFF/IR TAPE) $169.86
6135-01-351-1131 ANCD  3PER ITEM 12/EA
6135-00-826-4798 MISC AAA 12/EA
6135-00-985-7845 MISC AA 24/EA
6135-00-985-7846 MISC C 12/EA
6135-00-835-7210 MISC D 12/EA
01-398-5922 M145/M68 batt EA
4110-01-452-7317 CHEST, ICE STORAGE
Link Posted: 1/20/2005 8:47:17 PM EST
[#11]
Thanks for the list!

I have some huge lists of class IX items, from cool stuff to vehicle specific items, also the NSN's for every form or raw metal (think field expedient armor) for anyone that needs it.

It is too much to post, but email me at timothy.glance AT us.army.mil if you can use them
Link Posted: 2/9/2005 1:36:58 AM EST
[#12]
yall are life savers.  Im off to basic soon and I wouldn't give it too long untill my time over seas is coming.  so manythings I would forget to remember.



just like to say thanks to all the guys who've been over and back.
Link Posted: 2/18/2005 7:19:47 AM EST
[#13]
I'm off to basic soon as well. I appreciate your input!
Link Posted: 2/18/2005 11:48:20 PM EST
[#14]
If you wear glasses, take 2 sets of clear lenses and 2 sets of tinted lenses. They will only last about 6 months before they are sandblasted too much to see out of. If you are getting military birth control glasses, get the smallest frame that will fit your head. My issue glasses are so large, they interfear with my helmet.
Link Posted: 2/19/2005 10:15:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: ChrisLe] [#15]

Originally Posted By TANGOCHASER:
If you wear glasses, take 2 sets of clear lenses and 2 sets of tinted lenses. They will only last about 6 months before they are sandblasted too much to see out of. If you are getting military birth control glasses, get the smallest frame that will fit your head. My issue glasses are so large, they interfear with my helmet.



Good idea. If their medical dept is on the ball they should be ordering prescription lenses for the WileyX SG1 goggles that are issued...I took no chances and ordered both clear and tinted prescription lenses for my WileyX Romer II glasses from here

Also, despite what one may have been told do not wear contact lenses over there. I had countless cases of corneal abrasions because the fine sand will find its way into your eye and behind the contact lenses...
Link Posted: 2/20/2005 10:45:10 PM EST
[#16]
bump for the night crew
These suggestions are great but am always looking for more.
Friend suggested this
3 things you wish you'd left
3 things you wish you'd had
Link Posted: 3/4/2005 3:34:05 PM EST
[#17]
I can take no credit for this, but I came across a Lightfighter thread a few months ago that listed what to take.  I've hosted it and linked below.

It's a 256k PDF file, so dialup users be patient.

Lightfighter thread on what to take when deployed
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 4:14:25 AM EST
[#18]
Nice. Lot of suggestions for stuff I didn't think about. That NSN list will come in handy.
Link Posted: 3/31/2005 6:27:22 AM EST
[#19]
Well most of the gear issues have been covered, so I will only repeat that you need to wear your protective equipment.

I would like to add to the know your AO rule.  That is to learn the locals in your AO also.  My experience has been that the children will almost always approach us, when they keep their distance my "oh shit this dosn't feel right" alarm goes off.  If the locals are openly anti-American that is obvious, but many will tell you if Ali-Babba is in the AO.  Take what they tell you with some caution, but don't disregard it all together.

Trust your feelings, if it dosn't feel right it probably isn't.
Link Posted: 4/3/2005 2:28:48 PM EST
[#20]
Issued Aimpoint kits with the A2 carry handle mounts suck.  They move and the wings next to the carry handle eventually break.  I upgraded my A2 to an A4 with a flat top and M4 RAS.  Spent $$$ but worth the investment. Tango down grips are way better than the issue Knights VG.  I've seen a few break and the feel of the Tango Down is much better.
Link Posted: 4/4/2005 11:37:38 AM EST
[#21]
Here's what I've learned:

1. FOB's are not bad.  They provide basics with comfort.
2.  Running water and shoers, at least where I am.
3. Holster: Safariland 6004 with 2 mag pouch (sold at BX)-plentiful.
4. I wear glasses, so I bought a 10 dollar pair of goggles that fit over my glasses. (sells at BX)
5.  Knife:  My folding Kershaw for GP.  I have K-Bar if the need arises.
6.  S.O.B. m-16 Mag pouch suck as they come, need Malice clips to fit firmly on vest.
7. Pistol lanyard at BX works fine, no need for an expensive one.
8.  Good insoles for your boots, because you walk everywhere.

Link Posted: 4/4/2005 3:11:32 PM EST
[#22]
I cannot stress this enough. If you see something funny/strange, stop all activity in the immediate area and check it out. I found drug smuggling, holes in the perimeter, a land mine, and a tunnel they were digging under our base by checking out something that looked funny.
Link Posted: 4/10/2005 7:45:30 AM EST
[#23]
  concur with all the above. one new trick for medics, scrounge blood pressure cuffs and keep them with you they ake a really broad base tornequit/pressure dressing assit. easy to go on easy to adjust pressure and the pressure is spread out over a larger area which will do considerably less damage while applied or when removed
sorry about the spelling
vin
Link Posted: 4/23/2005 1:18:14 PM EST
[#24]
When I got into Iraq last year the first person I looked for was the guy who had the most combat time and incountry time out of the group.  Listen to the veterans they got all the answers.  As for gear everyone has covered it.  I recommend tring to find a M1014 Multipurpose Kabar($150).  Its a Kabar/bayo all in one.  Its light, sharp and can go very deep into a ribcage.  I replaced my old Kabar for that.  Try to find manuals for common middle eastern weapons.  Read up on what your enemy has, because just in case shit happens you might need a backup weapon fast.
Link Posted: 5/1/2005 2:03:32 PM EST
[#25]
This is a great thread.  I leave for OSUT soon, and my chances of getting deployed to iraq are probably pretty big.
Link Posted: 5/4/2005 5:10:13 AM EST
[#26]

Originally Posted By ajm1911:
bump for the night crew
These suggestions are great but am always looking for more.
Friend suggested this
3 things you wish you'd left
3 things you wish you'd had



3 things I wish I had left: my Eureka! RFI tent (takes up a lot of space), my cold weather RFI boots (same reason, I just suck up cold weather), and my ENTIRE MOLLE RUCK (where's my modified ALICE?)

3 things I wish I brought: some sort of knife sharpener, padlock shims (if you do any surreptitious breaching or deliberate searches, these are awesome) a plastic "picture" coffee cup from Starbucks (so I can keep at least one of my photos of my wife safe and handy for viewing)
Link Posted: 5/9/2005 7:08:36 PM EST
[#27]
tagged
Link Posted: 5/10/2005 6:19:42 AM EST
[#28]
Link Posted: 5/10/2005 1:15:27 PM EST
[#29]
tag
Link Posted: 5/11/2005 12:26:55 AM EST
[#30]

Originally Posted By Hoplite:
More commo training
More Medical Training
More firearms training


No shit. Never have enough.
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 8:14:40 AM EST
[#31]
We learned a lesson the hard way when we lost our first Trooper over here.  The uparmored M1114 HMMWVs your unit will draw in theater come with a nice armored turret for the M2 / Mk19 / M240 gunner on the roof.  These turrets have a sling seat for the gunner like any HMMWV with a roof hatch.  Our gunners were all told to sit low in the hatch ("helmet defilade") and only come up if their patrol comes under attack because of the high casualty rate among gunners who scanned the road at "nametag defilade" early on in OIF.

A great Trooper from my S3 section was killed a month ago when an artillery round detonated next to his HMMWV.  The intial blast and shrapnel probably caused the wounds that he died from, but the turret was also blown of the roof of the HMMWV by the IED and thrown about 10 meters from the vehicle.  The sling seat carried him with it.

If you have time and resources, see if your mechanics or shop guys can fabricate seats for your gunners that sit on top of a short pole that's bolted to the floor of the HMMWV between the seats.  Our guys used MRE boxes as a temporary fix until they could find something else.  It might not help in every case, but if it saves one guy, it's worthwhile.

I haven't heard this before - it certainly wasn't mentioned to us before we deployed - so I'd be curious to hear if anyone else has experience with this issue.  FWIW,

Dave
Camp Stryker, Iraq


Link Posted: 6/9/2005 6:38:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: GulDuCal] [#32]

Originally Posted By Hoplite:
More commo training
More Medical Training
More firearms training



Our unit training at Fort Benning (of all places) was a total fiasco.  It was simply training to fill in a check box, rather than "BATTLE-FOCUSED" training.  We had a bunch of FOBbit signal corps idiots wearing the "acorn" patch, acting as if they were drill instructors rather than OC's.  Instead of focusing on mission essential tasks, it seemed they mainly emphasized how to conduct FPOC/guard duty and how to run and hide from their artillery simulators, rather than how to operate effectively outside a FOB.  That USAR training unit wasn't particularly helpful at all.  As opposed to being a facilitator of training, they were in fact a hinderance to training.

Our 8-week stay at Fort Benning prior to deployment would have been more productive if all we did was commo, medical/cls, crew-served weapons, driving on patrol, and PT.   And more COMMO.

At Fort Benning, Commo training wasn't even brought up.  Before deploying to Iraq, I would strongly suggest training extensively on commo.  Practice entering a fill, practice entering freqs manually, practice setting GPS time, practice actually driving around in a humvee calling in checkpoints and to different task forces as you enter/leave their AO.  Trouble-shooting radio problems and fixing them while on the fly are essential skills out here.  

Note that you can use your Garmin to set GPS time.  Set your Garmin GPS to London time and remember to subtract one hour, since London is currently at British Summer Time (BST) which is in fact Zulu+1.  BST is in effect from end of March until the end of October.

Practice calling in SPOT/SALTY reports, practice IEDs/UXO, practice 9 line medevac.  For the IEDs and Medevac, give different scenarios (have a bunch of 3x5 cards with scenarios) and call it up.  For IEDs do surface-laid, buried, suspended/elevated, wireless or wired, decoy with possible secondary, possible VBIED, unknown/suspicious.  For medical have medics fill-out 3x5 cards with different injuries.  

Practice using Blue Force Tracker (BFT), connecting, turning on, shutting down, plotting CPs and boundaries, doing reports and messaging.  Unfortunately, civilian instructors at Leonard Wood and at Kuwait use laptops to teach.  The Army has to change this.  Hands on inside a humvee plugging in cables, pushing buttons, and using the stylus is the only way to learn.  

As for weapons training...
The M16 zero range was 6 miles from where we stayed and the Qualification range was 10 to 15 miles away from the zero range which wasted training time shuttling soldiers from range to range.  Once at the Qual range, NBC fire was performed before the Qual attempt (I've never seen that before).  And there was no 20-round familiar fire at the pop-ups prior to Qualifying.   Finally, Marksmanship instruction was provided only after a soldier boloed. WTF?  As for CQB/reflex fire (a 25 meter course), the idiot OC's wouldn't let our soldiers who boloed M16 do the Reflex fire.   None of our bolos had any trouble hitting the 50m target on the M16 qual range; hence, I fail to see why they wouldn't allow them to shoot reflex.  This wasted more valuable training days.

After all that, crew-served fire was conducted for primaries and not for everbody.  Our platoons made sure everyone knew how to disassembe/assemble, load, shoot, and clear our M2s. However, not everyone had a chance to shoot.   Also, training should involve firing M2s from humvees (our main platform) stationary and on the move while shooting stationary and moving targets.  Again training wasn't battle-focused.

They did try to give us convoy training at Ft. Benning, but the "acorn" people teaching were clueless.   Some of their solutions for certain scenarios made no tactical sense.  They frowned upon us being aggressive and employing fire and maneuver against an OPFOR being a few feet away.  Only 20 rounds of blank M16 ammo for a convoy course with 5 scenarios.   Also, they had us patrolling in 5-ton dumps.   No humvee gun platforms.

They should have trained us in similar equipment and combat configuration as units in theater.  For training, the Army needs to include Driving at combat speed, dealing with civilian traffic, setting up Flash TCPs, urban sweep, cordon and search, self recovery, etc.

Note: On M1114s, there is a M16 weapon rack at the feet of the right rear passenger.  Soldiers sitting at the right rear passenger always get their foot stuck by this while exiting the vehicle.  Whoever designed this feature is a total moron.  It is held there by two bolts.  We removed all ours.  



Thank God we have good senior NCOs in the line platoons, all with years of prior active service.


--------------------

As for gear and personal items to leave behind/bring...

Do NOT buy any camelbaks, LBVs/tactical vests, pistol belt, goggles, Wiley Xs, Nomex gloves, winter gloves, a case of AA batteries, balaclava, buttpack, bellville boots, fancy BDU belt, face paint, solar battery charger, solar shower, transformer, power strip, 220v plug adapter, DVD movies, fleece jacket, wool cap, polypros, canteens, night vision, weight set, boom box, 100 mph tape, ghillie suit, water filter, machete/kukri.  

You don't need half this crap, and if so, you will be issued everything at CIF and RFI.  100 mph tape and batteries you can buy at a PX in Iraq.  Electrical stuff and movies you can buy from Haji at your FOB.  Try not to carry too much stuff.  I showed up at Fort Jackson and then to Fort Benning with almost a full duffle bag and a laptop.  I left Benning with three tightly packed duffle bags and a laptop, and a fourth duffle in a conex.  Alot of the issued web gear, gloves and winter clothing/boots still sits in one duffle bag collecting dust.   We got issued two camelbaks, and everyone wore them at Benning.  Out here no one wears them; we just load coolers in our humvees with frozen water bottles while on patrol.

Things to bring... a bandana/do-rag to keep the dust out of your nose and mouth, a good watch, Garmin gps, multiplier, if you really have to just bring one combat knife, knife sharpener, sat phone (if you can afford it), laptop, digital camera, usb thumb drive, poncho liner, color pens (Staedler), Erasermate pens,  USGI canvas map case if you're a leader or ditch the case get one of the high speed desert colored backpacks at the PX, M16 mag pouches for OTV/IBAS, compass, any LED flashlight, CD player or iPod, binoculars, trijicon optics.

If you are a computer geek bring MS Office, Visio, MS Project, Adobe Acrobat, antivirus, ghost, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Flash, Photoshop, Gimp, external hard drive.

If you are an network geek bring Win2K/W2K3 Server, WinXPproSP2, MS Exchange, Password hack by Petter Nordhal, a bag (100pcs) of RJ-45 connectors, crimpers (Cat-5 is easy to find), Ethereal, a portscanner, Linux/FreeBSD, Unreal IRCd.


Link Posted: 6/9/2005 9:33:43 PM EST
[#33]

Originally Posted By GulDuCal:

Originally Posted By Hoplite:
More commo training
More Medical Training
More firearms training



Our unit training at Fort Benning (of all places) was a total fiasco.  It was simply training to fill in a check box, rather than "BATTLE-FOCUSED" training.  We had a bunch of FOBbit signal corps idiots wearing the "acorn" patch, acting as if they were drill instructors rather than OC's.  Instead of focusing on mission essential tasks, it seemed they mainly emphasized how to conduct FPOC/guard duty and how to run and hide from their artillery simulators, rather than how to operate effectively outside a FOB.  That USAR training unit wasn't particularly helpful at all.  As opposed to being a facilitator of training, they were in fact a hinderance to training.

Our 8-week stay at Fort Benning prior to deployment would have been more productive if all we did was commo, medical/cls, crew-served weapons, driving on patrol, and PT.   And more COMMO.

At Fort Benning, Commo training wasn't even brought up.  Before deploying to Iraq, I would strongly suggest training extensively on commo.  Practice entering a fill, practice entering freqs manually, practice setting GPS time, practice actually driving around in a humvee calling in checkpoints and to different task forces as you enter/leave their AO.  Trouble-shooting radio problems and fixing them while on the fly are essential skills out here.  

Note that you can use your Garmin to set GPS time.  Set your Garmin GPS to London time and remember to subtract one hour, since London is currently at British Summer Time (BST) which is in fact Zulu+1.  BST is in effect from end of March until the end of October.

Practice calling in SPOT/SALTY reports, practice IEDs/UXO, practice 9 line medevac.  For the IEDs and Medevac, give different scenarios (have a bunch of 3x5 cards with scenarios) and call it up.  For IEDs do surface-laid, buried, suspended/elevated, wireless or wired, decoy with possible secondary, possible VBIED, unknown/suspicious.  For medical have medics fill-out 3x5 cards with different injuries.  

Practice using Blue Force Tracker (BFT), connecting, turning on, shutting down, plotting CPs and boundaries, doing reports and messaging.  Unfortunately, civilian instructors at Leonard Wood and at Kuwait use laptops to teach.  The Army has to change this.  Hands on inside a humvee plugging in cables, pushing buttons, and using the stylus is the only way to learn.  

As for weapons training...
The M16 zero range was 6 miles from where we stayed and the Qualification range was 10 to 15 miles away from the zero range which wasted training time shuttling soldiers from range to range.  Once at the Qual range, NBC fire was performed before the Qual attempt (I've never seen that before).  And there was no 20-round familiar fire at the pop-ups prior to Qualifying.   Finally, Marksmanship instruction was provided only after a soldier boloed. WTF?  As for CQB/reflex fire (a 25 meter course), the idiot OC's wouldn't let our soldiers who boloed M16 do the Reflex fire.   None of our bolos had any trouble hitting the 50m target on the M16 qual range; hence, I fail to see why they wouldn't allow them to shoot reflex.  This wasted more valuable training days.

After all that, crew-served fire was conducted for primaries and not for everbody.  Our platoons made sure everyone knew how to disassembe/assemble, load, shoot, and clear our M2s. However, not everyone had a chance to shoot.   Also, training should involve firing M2s from humvees (our main platform) stationary and on the move while shooting stationary and moving targets.  Again training wasn't battle-focused.

They did try to give us convoy training at Ft. Benning, but the "acorn" people teaching were clueless.   Some of their solutions for certain scenarios made no tactical sense.  They frowned upon us being aggressive and employing fire and maneuver against an OPFOR being a few feet away.  Only 20 rounds of blank M16 ammo for a convoy course with 5 scenarios.   Also, they had us patrolling in 5-ton dumps.   No humvee gun platforms.

They should have trained us in similar equipment and combat configuration as units in theater.  For training, the Army needs to include Driving at combat speed, dealing with civilian traffic, setting up Flash TCPs, urban sweep, cordon and search, self recovery, etc.

Note: On M1114s, there is a M16 weapon rack at the feet of the right rear passenger.  Soldiers sitting at the right rear passenger always get their foot stuck by this while exiting the vehicle.  Whoever designed this feature is a total moron.  It is held there by two bolts.  We removed all ours.  



Thank God we have good senior NCOs in the line platoons, all with years of prior active service.


--------------------

As for gear and personal items to leave behind/bring...

Do NOT buy any camelbaks, LBVs/tactical vests, pistol belt, goggles, Wiley Xs, Nomex gloves, winter gloves, a case of AA batteries, balaclava, buttpack, bellville boots, fancy BDU belt, face paint, solar battery charger, solar shower, transformer, power strip, 220v plug adapter, DVD movies, fleece jacket, wool cap, polypros, canteens, night vision, weight set, boom box, 100 mph tape, ghillie suit, water filter, machete/kukri.  

You don't need half this crap, and if so, you will be issued everything at CIF and RFI.  100 mph tape and batteries you can buy at a PX in Iraq.  Electrical stuff and movies you can buy from Haji at your FOB.  Try not to carry too much stuff.  I showed up at Fort Jackson and then to Fort Benning with almost a full duffle bag and a laptop.  I left Benning with three tightly packed duffle bags and a laptop, and a fourth duffle in a conex.  Alot of the issued web gear, gloves and winter clothing/boots still sits in one duffle bag collecting dust.   We got issued two camelbaks, and everyone wore them at Benning.  Out here no one wears them; we just load coolers in our humvees with frozen water bottles while on patrol.

Things to bring... a bandana/do-rag to keep the dust out of your nose and mouth, a good watch, Garmin gps, multiplier, if you really have to just bring one combat knife, knife sharpener, sat phone (if you can afford it), laptop, digital camera, usb thumb drive, poncho liner, color pens (Staedler), Erasermate pens,  USGI canvas map case if you're a leader or ditch the case get one of the high speed desert colored backpacks at the PX, M16 mag pouches for OTV/IBAS, compass, any LED flashlight, CD player or iPod, binoculars, trijicon optics.

If you are a computer geek bring MS Office, Visio, MS Project, Adobe Acrobat, antivirus, ghost, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Flash, Photoshop, Gimp, external hard drive.

If you are an network geek bring Win2K/W2K3 Server, WinXPproSP2, MS Exchange, Password hack by Petter Nordhal, a bag (100pcs) of RJ-45 connectors, crimpers (Cat-5 is easy to find), Ethereal, a portscanner, Linux/FreeBSD, Unreal IRCd.





Damm. We are in almost identical units, doing very similar missions, and our ore-deploymnet training was equally worthless and run by the same bunch of fools.

Go figure.

I will put a big +1 for everything he said and add that if you coming here to Afghanistan go heavier on the snivel gear and stuff, as it is in much shorter supply here than Iraq. However, my guys all mailed footlockers to themselves and I had 8 boxes at home packed with various things, and when I got here and saw what I was going to need I just called hom and said "send box 2, 4, 5, 7" and got it. Damm sure don't stock up on DVD's coming here, they are all $3.

For the network geeks, go down to the motorpool and get them to order 5935-01-400-1495 it is a RJ-45 jack that doesn't need crimpers just pliers and works well.
Link Posted: 6/9/2005 10:55:09 PM EST
[#34]
What about Ear-Pro - it is something to consider in getting some of the molded electronic in the ear systems before deploying.

Link Posted: 6/10/2005 6:40:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: ChrisLe] [#35]

Originally Posted By n8loi:
What about Ear-Pro - it is something to consider in getting some of the molded electronic in the ear systems before deploying.




Theoretically, yes. Practically, No....Wearing earplugs on patrol, especially at night, dulls your senses and ability to hear oncoming vehicles and anybody walking up on your patrol. Also, the few people that constantly wore them on patrol developed chronic ear infections from the moisture that builds up in the ear canal and does not evaporate, and the fact that the earplugs themselves collect bacteria from the moisture accumulated from constant wearing.....Sadly, the alternative, of which i am living proof, is partial hearing loss and tinnitus from constantly firing your weapon or standing next to crew served weapons when they go off. Ultimately it will be an individual choice as to whether one wears them or not....

ETA: If anybody is interested I made a condensed version of a 9 line Medevac order on Microsoft Word that will easily fit in one's blouse. The 9-line itself is on the front and the different sub codes for each line are listed on the back. All you have to do is print it out and laminate it and you're good to go....Shoot me an IM and I'll email it to anyone who wants it.
Link Posted: 6/15/2005 7:57:18 AM EST
[#36]
tag.
Link Posted: 6/27/2005 11:46:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: Wildweasel] [#37]
This is for my deploying son - Iraq ,
do the thermoter cool-aid helmet liners work? they look like the newer version of the old doo-rag soaked in water we used to use. only 12.00

Also would the Polermax baselayers microfiber tshirts from Brigade quartermasters be a decent substitute for the underarmor? or just go with the real deal?

The AAfees online store has a microfiber tshirt listed under ACU  section that is copy (or the real deal under contract?) for 9.99 anyone use one yet?

Update-- we just recived the ACU t-shirts from AAFES Look good from what the wife says.
We'll see how they work.
Link Posted: 7/16/2005 6:51:01 PM EST
[#38]
Link Posted: 8/9/2005 7:16:21 PM EST
[#39]

Originally Posted By Hoplite:

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

Originally Posted By n8loi:
What about Ear-Pro - it is something to consider in getting some of the molded electronic in the ear systems before deploying.



Also, the few people that constantly wore them on patrol developed chronic ear infections from the moisture that builds up in the ear canal and does not evaporate, and the fact that the earplugs themselves collect bacteria from the moisture accumulated from constant wearing.....Sadly, the alternative, of which i am living proof, is partial hearing loss and tinnitus from constantly firing your weapon or standing next to crew served weapons when they go off. Ultimately it will be an individual choice as to whether one wears them or not....

I got tinnitus as well.  I wore Peltors but even with them off in the house or in its vicinity shit blowing up was still close enough to make my ears ring permanently.





cheap earpro (earplugs) sucks.  but it's better than nothing.  permanent hearing loss sucks worse.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:11:01 AM EST
[#40]
just a thought,for all you guys with ESS goggles which fog up every 10 seconds or so. i wish i'd had these while i was in either country. having never tried this model,i'm talking out my ear,but i'd have tried them out,anyhow.

http://www.diamondbacktactical.com/ESS-Tactical-Turbo-CAM-P232C47.aspx

they're ESS goggles with two built in exhaust fans,run on AAA.read the description if that sounds interesting to you. though,my suggestion,is get hold of whatever phone you can,and try their 800 number to doublecheck pricing,because the one i'm looking at isn't right.

ESS Tactical Turbo C.A.M. is the name of the goggles. their number (Diamondback Tactical) is 800-735-7030 or diamondbacktactical.com for their website.just a thought.

i agree with the post earlier from the guy bitching and about crew served weapons,etc being trained on only by those intended to use them. we should all know how to use every weapon proficiently,as you never know when your SAW gunner or 240 gunner/MK19/M2 gunner is going to go down.just a thought. as for the COMMS issue that was raised,i agree completely.once again,never know when you'll need/be stuck with the radio.if you're around any AF ETACs/TAC-Ps, by all means,get some classes,if possible.they're like our FOs,except they can call in a few more things,and generally carry different radios. hang out with the TACSAT guys,get some classes from them too.you never know when it'll come in handy.basically,envision every crappy thing that can happen,and wargame how to overcome it.it works.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:20:50 PM EST
[#41]
Wow

Reading your words about Ft Benning is like hearing myself reflect upon my Camp Shelby training.  It was all about "Checking the Box" as you said.  Were we anywhere besides Eastern Diyala, we would have lost alot more killed than we have had currently.  So far I have been the turret gunner with a 50 cal, 240 and 249 and I didn't fire one single shot at Camp Shelby with any of these weapons.  Trying to hold a 50 on target while you are chasing a Land Cruiser through a waddi system is not the time to be learning how to shoot from a moving vehicle.

The range instructors there were so arrogant that when I informed them that I was a current member of the All-Guard Highpower Rifle team, they told me that my assistance as a shooting coach was not needed and that since I was at that time still an E4, I would not be even allowed on the line to coach shooters who requested it as only NCO's were allowed to do that.

I don't think that anyone has mentioned this yet, but when we came we were still being issued and continue to use woodland OTV's.  One thing I found out on MSR overwatch missions trying to catch IED planters was that you can see woodland at night a looooooooonnnnnnggggg way away.   I got a plate carrier (front and back) from blackhawk in Coyote tan just to cover my OTV on the way out to OP's.  Color contrast is a big problem in the sand where I am.  I think most people are being issued desert colored vests now, but if you get woodland and plan on being out overnight, plan to cover that up somehow.

As for the climate, it is freakning hot half the year and damn cold in the morning the rest of the time.  You spend half of the year wishing it would rain and the other half hoping you never see rain again cause when it does rain, it floods (at least where I am, the climate in Iraq varies widely).  If you even think you will be gunning on a vehicle in the winter, bring a face mask of some kind.  I was issued real good lined leather gloves which I wore for several months when gunning (50) and my fingers would still go numb.  Another set of Quality gloves won't take up too much room.

As far as camelbacks, I have no idea where mine even is.  Frozen solid waterbottles form the TOC is the way to go.  Believe me, they don't stay frozen long in the summer.  When I had to walk into an OP at night (2-3K max), I just put them into the pack with the radio, plgr, batteries, etc.  Also the bottles are handy to piss in while rolling.

9mm mag pouches are handy for folding knives and for keeping a spare 50 case to use under the butterflies as a safety, since that is the only safety a 50 has and unless you are only on smooth roads (unlikely) you will get thrown into the butterflies.

One last note, nametag defilade is a deathsentance.  Keep your gunners head down.  He can see all he needs to see through the slot where the barrel of the csw goes through the shield.  He can stand if the shooting starts.  The IED's are not like you see in a movie.  They toss around vehicles like toys.  We had 3KIA in an 1114 that thrown 30 meters in the air.  No that is not a typo.  30 meters.

Best of luck to those of you yet to come here.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 9:39:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: pyro6988] [#42]
bump
Link Posted: 9/18/2005 10:06:11 PM EST
[#43]
tag
Link Posted: 9/19/2005 5:22:51 PM EST
[#44]

Originally Posted By ChrisLe:

Originally Posted By n8loi:
What about Ear-Pro - it is something to consider in getting some of the molded electronic in the ear systems before deploying.




Theoretically, yes. Practically, No....Wearing earplugs on patrol, especially at night, dulls your senses and ability to hear oncoming vehicles and anybody walking up on your patrol. Also, the few people that constantly wore them on patrol developed chronic ear infections from the moisture that builds up in the ear canal and does not evaporate, and the fact that the earplugs themselves collect bacteria from the moisture accumulated from constant wearing them or not....




Anyone wearing ear cover or plugs a lot can usually avoid ear infections by simply putting a medicine dropper of plain rubbing alcohol (70% is best but any will do--higher % just burns a little) in each ear once each day (twice might be better depending on wear time). A medicine dropper is the best way to apply, so you don't pour it into your eyes when applying. Get the home folks to put a couple in your next care package.
That's board-certified-MD advice, by the way (my ENT MD, not me). It has worked for me for quite a while. I never have an ear infection--have no ear damage, no hearing loss, no bad effects at all.

Link Posted: 9/19/2005 6:43:52 PM EST
[#45]
Link Posted: 9/28/2005 4:12:15 PM EST
[#46]
One small thing I've found works awsome.  A water bottle cooler.

Find some scrap styrofoam sheets (stereo, refrigerator packing, something about 3/4 inch thick)  cut it strips 1/2 inch or so thick, about the length of a water bottle.  Lay 3 or 4 strips of duct-tape down and set the styrofoam strips across them with slight gaps.  Roll it around the water bottle and cut off whatever needed to make it a fairly tight fit.  Wrap it with more tape and then make a circular piece of foam for the bottom attaching and covering with tape.  

If the bottle fits too tight don't worry, it'll loosen up.  If you put in a bottle that's ice-cold it'll stay cold until you're done drinking it.  I've left mine sitting in direct sunlight (silver or white tape probably works better) for hours and it was still cold.  It's alot better than downing the last of the bottle only to find out it's warm and alot easier than taking it in and out of a cooler.  
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 10:15:59 PM EST
[#47]
Does any one have NSN's for SAW accessories, specifically the collapsible stock and short barrel.

I will be leaving for Iraq this fall and I found out our platoon will have an unlimited budget starting this fiscal year. I've been told we can get anything we want to trick out our weapons. I've searched everywhere and can't find any NSN's.

Please help me ou here guys.

Actually any weapon accessories NSN's would be great!
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 10:58:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: ajm1911] [#48]

Originally Posted By DandaMan:
Does any one have NSN's for SAW accessories, specifically the collapsible stock and short barrel.

I will be leaving for Iraq this fall and I found out our platoon will have an unlimited budget starting this fiscal year. I've been told we can get anything we want to trick out our weapons. I've searched everywhere and can't find any NSN's.

Please help me ou here guys.

Actually any weapon accessories NSN's would be great!



Be really careful as the memo forbidding unauthorized weapons modifications came out last month and specifically addressed modding M240B
Link Posted: 10/16/2005 7:15:52 PM EST
[#49]
great post.  btw, that sure sounds like one f**ked up place, and hostile environment.  are you guys still experiencing mag shortages?
Link Posted: 10/16/2005 7:28:04 PM EST
[#50]
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