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Link Posted: 5/14/2012 8:57:25 AM EST
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming
Link Posted: 5/16/2012 2:22:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming


No shit?  I am going to try that when I get home.
Link Posted: 5/29/2012 2:32:41 PM EST
Earplugs are incredibly important to preserve your hearing.  Most people just jam them in, and they don't work well this way (I'm taling about the foam type, here).  The instructions suggest that you roll the earplug into a thin cylinder and push it into your ear.  I find it work better if you just roll half the earplug, and leave the other half alone.  This leaves you with something that looks a little more like a golf tee, and makes it much easier to get into your ear (your fingers can control it better).

Aditional tips:

You can buy them in bulk at the hardware store (they're cheap), but I always pick up a bunch of freebies at noisy workplaces that require them.  I used to work at a newspaper place, and I would always grab a few when I came by the bin (I also do that with free matchbooks).  Either way, there's no excuse not to have lots of them handy.

I carry a set of earplugs on my keychain in a "pill fob" from the pharmacy (along with a few small pills).  Over the years I've found that sooner or later you'll wish you had a pair of earplugs (loud music, rock concert, shooting, jackhammer street rapairs, etc), and having a few on your keychain makes it easy to have them when you need them.

I keep a baggie full of earplugs in my range bag, and an Altoids tin with earplugs and sugarless gum in my truck.  The gum is to keep my teeth clean or freshen my breath, and is the chicklet type (Orbit).

With an AR-15 or any gun that has some kind of internal storage, I like a to cram a couple of spare earplugs wherever they will fit.  Since they're squishy, it's usually not too hard.  Worst case scenario, you can tape or dummycord a small container to your sling to carry a few sets.  The GI earplug case dummycords nicely, and the small Altoid tins tape easily to your sling.




Link Posted: 5/31/2012 2:22:50 PM EST
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming




Just tried it, still foamed.
Link Posted: 10/25/2012 8:38:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/25/2012 8:39:02 AM EST by Armson-Oeg]
Works every time for me.. Of course you get a touch of foam, but not like dry cubes. Maybe its your water
Link Posted: 11/8/2012 4:19:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By Krackels:
<table]<tr]<td]
Originally Posted By jls7:
If for some reason you find yourself removing your old stock and you have no idea what you are doing, and your rear take down pin spring flies across the room never to be found again (Because you didnt have a sheet over your head ) have no fear you have an unlimited supply of these springs at your local 7-11. What the hell is he talking about!!? Im talking about the spring in A BIC lighter that pushes the flint up aginst the rolling strike wheel. It is exactly the same diameter and applies enough force on the detent when installed to keep the TDP from moving indefinitly. This way you dont have to order a .50 part and pay $7 in shipping for a stupid little spring that should have stayed in the gun anyway goddamit.

JLS7



+1, That's the best tip yet.


On that note, the spring from a retractable ballpoint pen (the kind they give away at banks) works for a buffer retainer spring in a pinch.
Link Posted: 11/9/2012 5:33:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Works every time for me.. Of course you get a touch of foam, but not like dry cubes. Maybe its your water


Tapping the sides of a soda can or bottle will keep it from erupting when you open it! The bubbles collect on the sides and expand when the drink is opened, but if the are not on the sides to begin with, they return into solution.
Link Posted: 11/29/2012 12:02:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By Inebriated:
I figured I'd post a little home defense tip in here that I think is my most valuable tool...

Sleep naked. If someone breaks into my house, they get one very angry, and very naked man with a 12 gauge and a bright ass flashlight. Besides feeling amazing, sleeping naked could save your life!


My wife said no to naked sleeping. Apparently i am to hairy and ugly even for her now!
Link Posted: 12/31/2012 12:49:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/3/2013 3:02:03 PM EST by spector]
Link Posted: 1/3/2013 3:01:45 PM EST
All BS aside. For the worlds best heating pad. Nothing works better than 2 socks filled 3/4 full with rice for a heating pad. Just put in microwave for 3 minutes and have about 1 hour of super hot heat. Reusable over and over.
Link Posted: 1/31/2013 12:05:29 PM EST
When you're at a bar and get a napkin, sprinkle some table salt on it before you put your drink on it.  It won't stick to the bottom of your glass.
Link Posted: 2/13/2013 2:53:21 PM EST
If you have a stack of old Berretta M9 Mags laying around from your military days and can't find a use for them and you happen to own an M&P 9mm, 9mmC,CZ75 Variant,Sig P226, Sig P228 and maybe a few others then you can re-locate the mag catch hole (i.e. cut a new one) to the proper place for your pistol. You can do this by disassembling your current mag and the M9 mag the placing them side by side with teh feed lips placed against a hard perpendicular surface and marking out the new location and dimensions with a sharpie or pencil then using a Dremel and a cutoff wheel to cut the new hole.

A few notes on this. The slide does not lock back on the last round with my M&P 9mm and the beretta mag sticks out slightly more than the factory mag and you lose 2 rounds of capacity but 500 rounds later my modified mags have not had a hiccup. They work great in their intended role as range mags and I didn't pay $30+ for them and I have a virtually unlimited supply
Link Posted: 2/13/2013 4:43:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By lawright1988:
If you have a stack of old Berretta M9 Mags laying around from your military days and can't find a use for them and you happen to own an M&P 9mm, 9mmC,CZ75 Variant,Sig P226, Sig P228 and maybe a few others then you can re-locate the mag catch hole (i.e. cut a new one) to the proper place for your pistol. You can do this by disassembling your current mag and the M9 mag the placing them side by side with teh feed lips placed against a hard perpendicular surface and marking out the new location and dimensions with a sharpie or pencil then using a Dremel and a cutoff wheel to cut the new hole.

A few notes on this. The slide does not lock back on the last round with my M&P 9mm and the beretta mag sticks out slightly more than the factory mag and you lose 2 rounds of capacity but 500 rounds later my modified mags have not had a hiccup. They work great in their intended role as range mags and I didn't pay $30+ for them and I have a virtually unlimited supply


Ditto, just had to open up the bottom of the mag catch hole for a Taurus 92.


CD

Link Posted: 2/17/2013 2:15:17 AM EST
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming


I do this so my beverage doesnt freeze to the ice.
Link Posted: 2/19/2013 12:00:57 AM EST
Originally Posted By lawright1988:
If you have a stack of old Berretta M9 Mags laying around from your military days and can't find a use for them and you happen to own an M&P 9mm, 9mmC,CZ75 Variant,Sig P226, Sig P228 and maybe a few others then you can re-locate the mag catch hole (i.e. cut a new one) to the proper place for your pistol. You can do this by disassembling your current mag and the M9 mag the placing them side by side with teh feed lips placed against a hard perpendicular surface and marking out the new location and dimensions with a sharpie or pencil then using a Dremel and a cutoff wheel to cut the new hole.

A few notes on this. The slide does not lock back on the last round with my M&P 9mm and the beretta mag sticks out slightly more than the factory mag and you lose 2 rounds of capacity but 500 rounds later my modified mags have not had a hiccup. They work great in their intended role as range mags and I didn't pay $30+ for them and I have a virtually unlimited supply


This should work with a Browning Hi power, too, as the dimensions of the magazine body sans catch hole are identical.
Link Posted: 2/19/2013 12:23:57 AM EST
There is a chemical out there that is so very useful I'm amazed that it hasn't been regulated out of existance.


71 uses for baking soda
Link Posted: 3/15/2013 5:34:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By lawright1988:
If you have a stack of old Berretta M9 Mags laying around from your military days and can't find a use for them and you happen to own an M&P 9mm, 9mmC,CZ75 Variant,Sig P226, Sig P228 and maybe a few others then you can re-locate the mag catch hole (i.e. cut a new one) to the proper place for your pistol. You can do this by disassembling your current mag and the M9 mag the placing them side by side with teh feed lips placed against a hard perpendicular surface and marking out the new location and dimensions with a sharpie or pencil then using a Dremel and a cutoff wheel to cut the new hole.

A few notes on this. The slide does not lock back on the last round with my M&P 9mm and the beretta mag sticks out slightly more than the factory mag and you lose 2 rounds of capacity but 500 rounds later my modified mags have not had a hiccup. They work great in their intended role as range mags and I didn't pay $30+ for them and I have a virtually unlimited supply


I have some mags on which someone tried this and failed. They came with this really great deal
I got on a PT92 and five mags. Only two or three of them that had this modification attempted, so
I can't complain. The gun ran like a champ, except with those two or three mags. I no longer have
that PT92, but I still have those mags, and l can't seem to get rid of them!
Link Posted: 4/28/2013 10:50:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/28/2013 10:51:42 AM EST by PineappleDevil]
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming


the bubbles are the release of co2 from the liquid and has nothing to do with the glass you're pouring it in. simple physics
Link Posted: 6/24/2013 12:32:17 PM EST
Ear plugs like these (trim to fit if needed)



work perfect as an "Accuwedge" between the upper and lower AR receiver. They can had for ~$0.10 each and work BETTER than the $4.00 name brand They will also work in a RRA lower unlike the actual "Accuwedge" design.
Link Posted: 6/24/2013 12:38:50 PM EST
The UNTHREADED shank of a 1/4" x 3" Nylon bolt works as a perfect 10/22 recoil buffer. Simply cut the shank to the same length as your original bolt stop and replace. This will cost ~$0.75 each as opposed to the $5.00 most want for the same thing.
Link Posted: 6/25/2013 9:08:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By lew:
Originally Posted By lawright1988:
If you have a stack of old Berretta M9 Mags laying around from your military days and can't find a use for them and you happen to own an M&P 9mm, 9mmC,CZ75 Variant,Sig P226, Sig P228 and maybe a few others then you can re-locate the mag catch hole (i.e. cut a new one) to the proper place for your pistol. You can do this by disassembling your current mag and the M9 mag the placing them side by side with teh feed lips placed against a hard perpendicular surface and marking out the new location and dimensions with a sharpie or pencil then using a Dremel and a cutoff wheel to cut the new hole.

A few notes on this. The slide does not lock back on the last round with my M&P 9mm and the beretta mag sticks out slightly more than the factory mag and you lose 2 rounds of capacity but 500 rounds later my modified mags have not had a hiccup. They work great in their intended role as range mags and I didn't pay $30+ for them and I have a virtually unlimited supply


This should work with a Browning Hi power, too, as the dimensions of the magazine body sans catch hole are identical.


This also works for the early Walther P99s and the 9mm XD pistols (not the XDm)
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:19:29 PM EST
If you dont have a set of brass punches and need to drift a sight or such, an empty .22lr case can slip over a steel punch tip and provide a non-mar surface.
Link Posted: 8/3/2013 1:34:35 AM EST
That above is a really cool idea! I'll actually be using this one very soon.
Thanks.
Link Posted: 8/12/2013 12:43:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/12/2013 12:46:44 PM EST by zalta19800]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By clippen:??? ?????? ??????? ??? ?????? ???? ?????? ??????? ???? ?????? ??????? ???? ???? ????? ????? ????? ????? ???? ????? ????? ???? ????? ????? ??? ???? ????? ????? ??? ??? ???? ??? ?????? ??? ?????? ???? ????? ??? ???? ????? ?????? ????? ??????? ????? ??????? ???? ????? ????? ??????? ???? ????? ???? ??????? ????? ???? ?????? ????? ????? ????? ????? ????? ??? ????? ??????? ?? ????? ????? ????? ?? ??? ???? ??? ???? ????? ??? ???? ????? ?????? ??????? ???? ????? ??? ??????? ??? ???? ???? ????? ????? ??? ?????? ????? ??? ???? ????? ????? ????? ???
[div style='text-align: center;']<table]<tr]<td]
Originally Posted By blueheeler66:
[div style='text-align: center;']<table]<tr]<td]
Originally Posted By von_landstuhl:
[div style='text-align: center;']Originally Posted By jmindler:
I've been known to assemble or disassemble weapons in a well-lit room with a bedsheet over my upper torso and weapon so i dont have to chase errant detents



+1.  In addition, the front detent pin can be held in with a very small slotted screwdriver until the pivot pin is installed.




+1  3/16" flat blade, round shaft screwdriver (works great for me)



Or a utility knife blade.
View Quote

A great source for small quantities of padding material... is a Coozie, the 3/8 or 1/2" thick soda/beer can insulators! I have padded many otherwise useful items with these, which are usually provided free with ads printed on them.
One useful item I made with these (the first, in fact) was a gasoline siphon starter for a standard GI jerry can. I cut the coozie into a 5" square, cut 2 holes in it big enough for some 5/8" neoprene tubing, pushed a 4" length of tubing thru one hole and a 4' long tube thru the other, sealed them with aquarium cement and presto*! I put the shorter end of the tubing into the jerry can, and used the Coozie material to seal the can while I blew into the 4" length of the tube to start the siphon. No more 89-octane breath! With a little practice I could refill the gas tank of my van with one arm tucked in my belt!


==||= <== short tube-- blow into this end
==========||====== <-- short end of long tube-- goes into gas can
^ ||
| ^
| | coozie material
long end of long tube-- goes into gas tank



*It's way, way better to let the cement dry before using the siphon starter.
Link Posted: 8/12/2013 7:39:42 PM EST
Zalta, I did exactly the same thing about 20 years ago! I had a Ford Econoline van and 2 metal jerry cans. I went EVERYwhere with that setup!

I put a loop of small rope on it, attached it to a hook. I used the hook and rope to hold the jerry can against the side of my van. I was able to start a good siphon every time.

My tip: If you lose the recoil spring plug from your 1911, you can use a spent casing to replace it! You must file down the rim or it won't fit but I used this for a couple of weeks till I got to a gun store.
Link Posted: 9/15/2013 12:21:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2013 12:23:36 AM EST by Monsterbishi]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PineappleDevil:


the bubbles are the release of co2 from the liquid and has nothing to do with the glass you're pouring it in. simple physics
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PineappleDevil:
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming


the bubbles are the release of co2 from the liquid and has nothing to do with the glass you're pouring it in. simple physics


Pouring technique is the real key, pay attention to any decent bartender pouring a carbonated/bubbly drink - notice how the glass is tilted and the liquid is being poured down the interior wall of the glass, it is to minimise the creation of nucleation sites.

ETA: And lo, page 24 is mine.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 8:36:06 PM EST
Instead of buying often expensive and often not-thick-enough shooting mat, go to your local gymnastics club and ask if you can have a worn out gym mat they are fixing to throw away.  They wear out, and are then entirely unsafe to use for gymnastics, but are quite fine for saving your knees and elbows when shooting prone, especially if your range floor is concrete!
Link Posted: 11/24/2013 2:01:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/24/2013 5:11:56 PM EST by bucko1975]
Mayo works great for removing tree sap.

My dad use learned it from his days of framing houses since most guys would get a sammich from the deli and would have the little mayo packets with them that they would keep in the truck to remove the sap on their hands from the lumber.
Link Posted: 11/24/2013 5:54:46 PM EST
They say peanut butter removes gum from children's hair. I have used olive oil to get chewing gum out of a favorite shirt; the oil melts the gum to a point where you can get rid of the rest with a dose of very hot water.

Link Posted: 12/7/2013 9:07:06 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By deanwormer:
Instead of buying often expensive and often not-thick-enough shooting mat, go to your local gymnastics club and ask if you can have a worn out gym mat they are fixing to throw away.  They wear out, and are then entirely unsafe to use for gymnastics, but are quite fine for saving your knees and elbows when shooting prone, especially if your range floor is concrete!
View Quote


I'd be sure to thoroughly disinfect anything I got from a gym. Lots of nasty things on people's skin (and elsewhere). People are gross.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:30:19 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Makarov:
Ear plugs like these (trim to fit if needed)

http://www.philpalombi.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/ear-plugs.jpg

work perfect as an "Accuwedge" between the upper and lower AR receiver. They can had for ~$0.10 each and work BETTER than the $4.00 name brand They will also work in a RRA lower unlike the actual "Accuwedge" design.
View Quote



Thanks for the tip. I need a accuwedge but now ill just try this instead.
Link Posted: 12/28/2013 12:29:31 AM EST
If you keep lots of stuff in a dresser drawer and it keeps moving or rolling around, fill up the drawer with cardboard boxes to keep things separated.
Link Posted: 12/31/2013 5:30:31 PM EST
Need to remove the foregrip on a pump-action shotgun use an castle nut wrench to remove the the nut attached too the mag tube.
Link Posted: 4/20/2014 3:13:34 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By deanwormer:
Instead of buying often expensive and often not-thick-enough shooting mat, go to your local gymnastics club and ask if you can have a worn out gym mat they are fixing to throw away.  They wear out, and are then entirely unsafe to use for gymnastics, but are quite fine for saving your knees and elbows when shooting prone, especially if your range floor is concrete!
View Quote


Problem with this is that technically, they could be held legally liable for any sort of injury you incurred - no matter how trivial - while using that mat that they gave you.  No business owner with an ounce of legal sense would go for that.  OTOH, if they threw it in an open dumpster & you absconded it, they'd be off the hook.  Of course, then there's the little matter of the property/ownership rights &/or liability obligations of the dumpster owner...

Knee pads work, & are more portable.
Link Posted: 4/20/2014 5:48:58 AM EST
Seen this before, but I will throw it out in this thread because it works really well.

Use Fieblings Leather Dye to dye unfinished / underfinished rifle furniture any color (red, purple, blue, green, brown, black, etc) then finish with oil, wax, or polyurethane. It costs around $5.00 a bottle and will finished about 20 AK stock sets. I use the dark red on all my AKs and they always look great.
Link Posted: 7/28/2014 9:55:58 AM EST

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Odingaard:


Seen this before, but I will throw it out in this thread because it works really well.



Use Fieblings Leather Dye to dye unfinished / underfinished rifle furniture any color (red, purple, blue, green, brown, black, etc) then finish with oil, wax, or polyurethane. It costs around $5.00 a bottle and will finished about 20 AK stock sets. I use the dark red on all my AKs and they always look great.
View Quote




 
Pictures of the AK furniture?



Link Posted: 8/17/2014 12:13:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Monsterbishi:


Pouring technique is the real key, pay attention to any decent bartender pouring a carbonated/bubbly drink - notice how the glass is tilted and the liquid is being poured down the interior wall of the glass, it is to minimise the creation of nucleation sites.

ETA: And lo, page 24 is mine.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Monsterbishi:
Originally Posted By PineappleDevil:
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming


the bubbles are the release of co2 from the liquid and has nothing to do with the glass you're pouring it in. simple physics


Pouring technique is the real key, pay attention to any decent bartender pouring a carbonated/bubbly drink - notice how the glass is tilted and the liquid is being poured down the interior wall of the glass, it is to minimise the creation of nucleation sites.

ETA: And lo, page 24 is mine.


Henry's Law

The temperature of the glass can have an effect

Simple physics
Link Posted: 10/5/2014 6:05:35 AM EST
On a molded plastic .22 mag loader as is commonly used for loading AR .22 mags, the plastic post that pushes the cartridge down can experience a lot of side force and break off at the interface to the loader body.  To repair the broken loader, drill a hole in the loader top where the broken off post used to be, and install an 8-32 x 3/4" bolt held in by a hex nut with split or star washers so the bolt won't work loose.
Link Posted: 10/19/2014 11:40:17 AM EST
The typical 9 mm AR buffer has a two-piece steel body that is the same diameter as the part of the standard buffer body that interfaces to the bolt impact disk-like portion.  The typical recoil spring has burrs at the ends where the wire was cut.  As a result, the recoil spring has a tendency to grab and drag the entire length of the buffer making the removal of the buffer from the spring an aggrevating process.  Solution - deburr the ends of the spring so that, even though the fit is tight, at least the spring no longer bites into the surface of the buffer.
Link Posted: 12/11/2014 1:35:35 AM EST
The firing pin works perfectly for breaking down a bolt, and the charging handle saves your finger tips very well.
Link Posted: 12/11/2014 1:25:49 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hendrkj:


Henry's Law

The temperature of the glass can have an effect

Simple physics
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hendrkj:
Originally Posted By Monsterbishi:
Originally Posted By PineappleDevil:
Originally Posted By Armson-Oeg:
Rinse your glass of ice cubes with water before you pour your soda, Keeps it from  foaming


the bubbles are the release of co2 from the liquid and has nothing to do with the glass you're pouring it in. simple physics


Pouring technique is the real key, pay attention to any decent bartender pouring a carbonated/bubbly drink - notice how the glass is tilted and the liquid is being poured down the interior wall of the glass, it is to minimise the creation of nucleation sites.

ETA: And lo, page 24 is mine.


Henry's Law

The temperature of the glass can have an effect

Simple physics

I always thought rinsing the ice melted it slightly and removed any sharp nucleation sites.
Link Posted: 12/16/2014 11:08:30 AM EST
A few RTV sealant  within the hole between the A2 pistol grip as well as the trigger guard saves your middle finger from irritation.
Link Posted: 1/13/2015 9:42:41 PM EST
I was replacing doors in the house and also instead of throwing the existing doorways aside, I positioned them on top of a couple of "saw horses" to make an instantaneous workbench. The opening in that is used for your lock set up resistant to the wall structure produces a good remove regarding wires, etc coming from equipment.
Link Posted: 1/13/2015 9:58:29 PM EST
While using opportunity bands offered from Your local supermarket as well as an Directed light coming from Your local supermarket to give your low-cost yet fairly effective light install.
Link Posted: 3/11/2015 9:15:11 AM EST
A 3/8" Drive extension fits into the lateral compensator ports on the AAC Brakeout and muzzle brakes, it helps when timing versus using a GD wrench.
Link Posted: 4/22/2015 6:05:51 PM EST
If you have an AR with tight pivot and takedown pins, make a pin pusher from an old tooth brush.  Cut the bristle head off leaving a skinny shaft and handle.  Grind the skinny shaft down to fit the 1/4" pins.
Link Posted: 10/18/2015 10:49:27 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/18/2015 6:12:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By bucko1975:
Mayo works great for removing tree sap.

My dad use learned it from his days of framing houses since most guys would get a sammich from the deli and would have the little mayo packets with them that they would keep in the truck to remove the sap on their hands from the lumber.
View Quote


It should be good for removing chewing gum from hair, clothing, etc. I used olive oil to get some bubblegum from a favorite shirt of mine.
Link Posted: 10/18/2015 6:18:45 PM EST
Household Goop is an excellent adhesive, it'll mend anything but a broken heart.

I have used it to extend the life of my duty boots. Build up the area where they are worn out and use 'em for another 5-6 months!

Anyone else have any "unusual" uses for Goop?

BTW it's also know as Super Shoe Goo.
Link Posted: 11/27/2015 6:27:16 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By coyotesilencer:
I have been doing this for years. I got sick of bulk pack .22 boxes spilling all over my truck seats/floor or in the dirt. The plastic jug Gatorade powder mix comes in fits a 550rd bulk pack of .22's like it was made for it. With a tight fitting lid, it has greatly cut down on spilled .22's.

http://i154.photobucket.com/albums/s266/coyotesilencer/IMAG0382.jpg
View Quote



That's awesome!  I gotta find me something like that.  I had 6-7 PowerAde containers like that, but I tossed them out last year
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