Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 6/10/2002 4:33:31 PM EST
Is .30-06 the same as 7.62x54? I found in a book that the Enfield Rifle M1917 fires ".30-06 U.S. Service". Is this round any different than the "civilian" .30-06?
I have a lot to learn...
Link Posted: 6/10/2002 4:49:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/10/2002 4:51:05 PM EST by brouhaha]
No! The 7.62x54 is a rimmed cartridge. (Thus it's true nomenclature of 7.62x54R)

The 30-06 is also known as the 7.62x63.
Link Posted: 6/10/2002 5:13:02 PM EST
Thank you.
What is the difference between .30 Carbine and .30 M1906? I already know what fires them, but little about the cartridge itself.
Link Posted: 6/10/2002 6:38:42 PM EST
Link Posted: 6/10/2002 8:47:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
Is .30-06 the same as 7.62x54? I found in a book that the Enfield Rifle M1917 fires ".30-06 U.S. Service". Is this round any different than the "civilian" .30-06?
I have a lot to learn...



Trying to be brief:

In the late 1800s Russia adopted the Moison-Nagent bolt action rifle. It was chambered for the 7.62x54R cartridge.
In 1903 the United States adopted the M1903 Springfield rifle (based on the action designed by Peter and Paul Mauser in Germany.
The original cartridge was called the .30-03 (for the caliber and the year of adoption). In 1906 the United States adopted a new cartridge with a shoerter case neck, the .30-06 service cartridge. The M1903s were modified as needed for the changed cartridge.

Meanwhile in Britain: the British "Tommy" went to war with a SMLE (Short Magazine Lee-Enfield) chambered for the .303 Mark VI (and later Mark VII) round. The difference was Mark VI used a round-nosed FMJ lead core round, and the Mark VII used a spitzer style pointed projectile. Spitzer pattern projectiles upset and tumble much sooner in organic soft targets. But the British did it one better. The Mark VII had a lead core in the rear of the projectile and a (VARIOUSLY) aluminum, soft steel, fibre, or plastic insert in the nose. The weight is WAY back in the bullet, causing it to tumble much quicker.

In the early 1910s, Britain was interested in designing a Mauser pattern rifle to equip her troops. Prototypes were made with a caliber of about .280, using a rimless cartridge, compared to the rimmed .303 British. Then came the Great War. British production of the Mark III and even the simplified Mark III* SMLE could not meet demand. So the British Crown contracted Remington and Winchester in the United States to make Pattern 1914 rifles based on the .280 trials rifles for British use. Many were used for sniper equipment in the Great War. In 1917, United States production of the M1903 Springfield also fell short of demand. So the government had the two contractors make M1917 "Enfield" rifles in .30-06 for US use. More M1917s went to Europe with the AEF than M1903 Springfields. Alvin York used a M1917 "Enfield" when he captured 127 Germans single-handedly....

Scott

Link Posted: 6/10/2002 10:23:18 PM EST
I can give the long answer, if anyone needs more info....

Scott




Link Posted: 6/11/2002 6:42:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:
Thank you.
What is the difference between .30 Carbine and .30 M1906? I already know what fires them, but little about the cartridge itself.



The .30 Carbine is just a pistol round that is fired out of short carbines and handguns.

The .30 M1906 is also known as - hold on - .30-06 (bet that -06 threw ya). Which is a rifle cartrige. The bullet is heavier, of a different profile, and moves MUCH faster.

BTW there were other US .30 cal rounds. There was the round the Kraig rifle used and an earlier version of the .30-06 adopted in 1903.
Link Posted: 6/11/2002 7:01:19 AM EST
Thank y'all.
Link Posted: 6/11/2002 9:07:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By Forest:
BTW there were other US .30 cal rounds. There was the round the Kraig rifle used and an earlier version of the .30-06 adopted in 1903.



The round for the U.S. Krag-Jorgenson was the .30-40 Krag. Was .30 caliber and the original powder charge was 40 grains of powder...

Scott


Top Top