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Posted: 8/21/2017 8:10:13 AM EDT
I've been on the lookout for a 92 for a year or two off and on, but have yet to pull the trigger.  I'm just looking for a plinker that might see the deer woods once or twice, just to break up the normal monotony.  I've pretty well settled on a Rossi, since it looks like they are pretty well the only game in town for $400 - $500.  Does anyone know how old you have to go to get one without the safety?

My primary question was actually caliber related though.  This whole time that I've been on the lookout, I have been set on a .45 Colt, .45 LC, or whatever you prefer to call it.  I figured that I would go that route for the nostalgia.  Well, yesterday I am just doing some random 1892 research and I come to find out that .45 LC wasn't even available originally because Colt's patent wouldn't let anyone else chamber the round.  So now I'm thinking that if nostalgia is out the window, maybe I ought to just go .357 or .44 Mag.  I don't have a pistol in any of the three rounds, so the logistics of shared ammo is a wash.  I do roll my own, but being able to buy some plinking rounds off the shelf at Wally World would be a bonus.  Any suggestions or insight would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 8:40:33 AM EDT
[#1]
I have a 92 in 357, it's a newer one, fun gun
I would like one in 45 long colt also to match my 1873 SAA
Plus I handload for both calibers
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 9:49:33 AM EDT
[#2]
I also have two Rossi '92's in 357mag, a 20" carbine and a 24" rifle as well as two Uberti's, a '73, 24" rifle and a '66, 19" Yellowboy carbine in 45 Colt.  All four a blast to shoot as I handload for all of them.  For what you describe, the 357mag Rossi is what you want as you can handload it down to 90grn, 700fps mouse fart plinking loads 100grn, 125grn, and up to heavy loaded Buffalo Bore 357mag Heavy 158grn 2,153fps medium game loads. 

For medium sized deer at ranges under 100yds, the Rossi is adequate as it produces bottom end 30-30 power at the shorter ranges.  The action is strong enough to load them to original 357mag levels (40,000psi) as well as Ruger only 45 Colt levels as the rifle is also chambered in the 60,000psi 454 Casull, however, with it's light weight, it will kick like a mule with heavy 45 Colt loads.  Even full power 357mag loads are lightly recoiling and ammo is plentiful for them. 

They are great rifles.  I've had mine since 2009 and each has well over 4K rds through them with no issues.  I got Steve's Gun's $58 action and trigger kit with the DvD that shows you how to slick up your rifle and have done the work on three so far (my two and a friend's).  It's easy to follow his DvD and you end up with a great shooting rifle (or two).
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 10:13:36 AM EDT
[#3]
Have one in 357, an older LSI import.  Fun gun to play with, surprisingly accurate.  More so than any Winchester 94 I've owned.

The safety is a non-issue.  Flick it off and ignore it.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 10:20:37 AM EDT
[#4]
The safety can be removed and a plug added, or a peep sight fits in the hole.  

I have a safety version in stainless.  Runs very smooth. 
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 10:28:53 AM EDT
[#5]
I have (2) Rossi 92's.  A .357 and a .44 mag.

Love em.  Both are very smooth and fun to shoot.  Recoil on the .44 is what you'r expect but the .357 shooting 38 specials can be handled all day long.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 11:40:34 AM EDT
[#6]
You might consider going with a .357 Magnum lever gun.  I own an EMF Hartford lever action with 24" octagon barrel made by Rossi and it is fun to shoot.  

Remington 125g SJFP .357 Mag. cartridges chronograph at 2125 fps/21 fps ES 15' from the muzzle.  I would think that would be a decent hunting load.  It groups well under 4" at 100 yards with iron sights.  I've fired quite a few 2-1/2" groups, but defer to the largest groups I've fired.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 10:07:35 PM EDT
[#7]
I have a Rossi octagon barrel in 45LC. Utterly love it. However if you want versatility get something in 357mag and the safety delete. You will never look back. 45LC is one of those calibers that if your little heart is set on it then go for it. How ever with 45LC your going to get into bidding wars with fudds and other brass whores on Gunbroker. 357 not really at all.
Link Posted: 8/21/2017 10:25:35 PM EDT
[#8]
I'm interested in a .357, either 16" or 20" in stainless. But they seem to be hard to fine right now. .357/.38 is a bit easier and cheaper to fine than .44 Mag/Spl. .45 LC seems even more difficult/expensive. I already have guns in .357/.38 and .44.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 1:46:01 PM EDT
[#9]
I think that this thread has me convinced to go .357.  I've got access to dies and components from dad's wheel gun, so that's icing on the cake.  I think that I will look for a 16" barrel with the oversized loop.  I actually like the looks of the 20" and 24" barrels better, but I'm going for compact.  

I saw that at least one poster above was getting 4ish" groups out of his 20" barrel with the irons.  Anybody have a 16" and a 20" that has compared the groups?  I figure if I can get a 16" barrel with irons to hit a pie plate at 100 I'll be satisfied, anything better is more icing on the cake.

I've seen that the older Puma imports don't have the safety.  I know that I can flip the safety to fire and forget it, or get the plug as was stated above, but all else being equal, I'd prefer to not have the safety.  Anyone know how the old Pumas and more modern Rossi's compare?  If whatever I end up with is a little stiff, I'll probably get the DVD and spring kit that was discussed above, just for a project.
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 2:35:04 PM EDT
[#10]
I have only shot minute of steel.  It isn't a target rifle. 

My newer stainless Rossi required no break in.  One of the smoothest I have seen.  Some of the older ones were pretty tight and needed a bit of shooting to loosen up.  If you find a used one, that work may already be done for you.  A hammer spring kit can lighten up the action considerably.  I didn't change the spring in my current rifle.   This is either my fourth or fifth one.  I wish that I had never sold any of the ones in the past.  I hope to correct this in our current salad days. 
Link Posted: 8/22/2017 5:51:30 PM EDT
[#11]
I removed the safeties on both of mine and added Steve's plug (you barely notice the round plug at the top rear of the bolt).  They come with a half cock, just the the original 1892 did, so that's good enough for me and I don't have to worry about accidentally engaging the safety just before a shot.  I can't say enough good things about both of mine.  My rifle length with the tang and globe sights gives me a 30" sight radius and with my 158grn handloads, I regularly shoot at steel plates at 300 yds and bowling pins at 200 yds with it.  My carbine is good at 8" steel plates at 200 yds as well. 

One of the great things about the 357mag is that if you handload, you can shoot it for cheaper than you can buy 22 mag ammo

My first Rossi.  My long range shooter.



I liked it so much I decided to get a 20" carbine to go with.



Some of the stocks come finished with a dull, lack luster finish.  Mine did but a coat of WATCO Danish Oil, Medium Walnut applied right over the standard finish (after a good cleaning) made a world of difference.

Stock from Rossi - dull, no color, no pop.



After a coat of WATCO Danish Oil the color and depth of the wood is fantastic.

Link Posted: 8/23/2017 7:51:40 AM EDT
[#12]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I removed the safeties on both of mine and added Steve's plug (you barely notice the round plug at the top rear of the bolt).  They come with a half cock, just the the original 1892 did, so that's good enough for me and I don't have to worry about accidentally engaging the safety just before a shot.  I can't say enough good things about both of mine.  My rifle length with the tang and globe sights gives me a 30" sight radius and with my 158grn handloads, I regularly shoot at steel plates at 300 yds and bowling pins at 200 yds with it.  My carbine is good at 8" steel plates at 200 yds as well. 
View Quote
That really did dress up that stock!  I might open my search up to 20" barrels as well.
Link Posted: 8/23/2017 11:25:57 AM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

That really did dress up that stock!  I might open my search up to 20" barrels as well.
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I feel that the 20" is much better balanced than the 16" and just points so much better as well.  The extra sight radius is a plus on aiming accuracy too.  There's a reason that the 20" carbine was the most popular style by a huge amount in both the original '92 and '94.
Link Posted: 9/5/2017 9:03:39 AM EDT
[#14]
I have a 24" blued octagonal in .44 Magnum.  It is the bee's knees.  And very accurate. Quite pleasant to shoot as well.
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