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Posted: 7/22/2013 9:47:14 PM EST
I never thought I'd reload for the 9 mm but now I may. I already have a lot of brass that I've collected over the years and I actually have a set of dillon dies. I was going to set up my 550 or 650 for it, but my question is is I see Lee has a factory crimp die for the 9mm. Do many use them? I use them for my rifle reloads, but have never used them on my pistol reloads. Anyway, any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 10:20:37 PM EST
Yes I use a crimp die for every auto loading gun I own, the last thing I need is setback especially from a handgun, I use the taper crimp for my 9mm IIRC
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 12:02:01 AM EST
I use the dillon crimp die (I have the dillon 9mm carbide set) without issue... Have not personally used a Lee FCD on 9mm.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 1:17:09 AM EST
I do not. I just use my Hornady 3 die set up for both 9mm and 45ACP. I did go out and buy separate seating dies but didn't order bushings at the same time and haven't gotten around to ordering those so they are sitting in their original packaging. I haven't had any issues with setting up both calibers and using the same dies to seat and crimp in the same step. Plenty of folks on here swear by the LFCD, I haven't just felt the need to use it.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 2:56:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 2:57:15 AM EST by Danger6]
For Dillon progressive, best results IMHO is with 4th station being the taper crimp die only (whatever brand works for you). I believe Lee says their FCD is a taper crimp die.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:11:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 3:11:27 AM EST by steve4102]
I always crimp in a separate step so I like the Lee four die set with the dedicated crimp die.

The Lee Crimp die is not like any other crimp die and it's use is very controversial.

Unlike other crimp dies the Lee die has a carbide sizing ring at the base. It is designed to size any out of spec round back down to factory specs and to also crimp the case mouth.

There are some that feel this carbide ring also swages down the bullet and causes accuracy issues and leading issues it you are loading lead bullets.

I do not have this problem with my 45 or 9mm crimp dies. The loaded rounds do not make contact with the carbide ring so no unwanted post sizing is taking place. My 10MM/40 die made hard contact with the bullets and loading lead was out of the question. I sent it back to Lee and they opened it up .002 and all is well.

I like the Lee Factory Taper crimps dies, others do not.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:18:51 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:34:48 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:11:34 AM EST
I do.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:27:40 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Waldo:

No. I've never had a problem loading 9 with Dillon dies.
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This but I have a bunch of Lee crimp dies in other flavors
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:27:44 AM EST
I gage all my completed rounds. Anything that does not cleanly gage, goes through the Lee FCD and is tested again. This is in 9mm, 45, and 38.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:34:07 AM EST
Absolutely yes for 9mm.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:39:14 AM EST
I use it on all reloads including 9mm. Seems to work great for me and my needs, YMMV
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:40:53 AM EST
yes, mainly as a way to get rid of the "bullet bulge"
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:48:06 AM EST
Originally Posted By Blasternank:
I never thought I'd reload for the 9 mm but now I may. I already have a lot of brass that I've collected over the years and I actually have a set of dillon dies. I was going to set up my 550 or 650 for it, but my question is is I see Lee has a factory crimp die for the 9mm. Do many use them? I use them for my rifle reloads, but have never used them on my pistol reloads. Anyway, any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
View Quote


Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 6:20:49 AM EST
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Originally Posted By peligro113:
Yes I use a crimp die for every auto loading gun I own, the last thing I need is setback especially from a handgun, I use the taper crimp for my 9mm IIRC
View Quote

Link Posted: 7/23/2013 6:42:43 AM EST
Yup always.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 6:44:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 6:47:53 AM EST by wildearp]
yes, for two reasons. In the 9mm AR platform, with winchester cases, the thin wall results in bullet setback using the Dillon crimp die. Even Dillon phone techs suggested I use the FCD. This solved that problem.

I also had a Glock 19 with a really tight chamber. It would find every bulged bullet and lock up tight. I had to use a case gauge and sort each round and shoot the bulged ones in my Sig 228. I haven't used teh gauge since I switched to the FCD.

I also had to change my .45 setup to FCD because of an overly tight Sig GSR chamber.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 6:45:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 6:46:58 AM EST by wildearp]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LukeDuke:


Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv
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Originally Posted By LukeDuke:
Originally Posted By Blasternank:
I never thought I'd reload for the 9 mm but now I may. I already have a lot of brass that I've collected over the years and I actually have a set of dillon dies. I was going to set up my 550 or 650 for it, but my question is is I see Lee has a factory crimp die for the 9mm. Do many use them? I use them for my rifle reloads, but have never used them on my pistol reloads. Anyway, any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.


Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv


The shell plate is hardened steel. A file will not even scratch it. Your statement is full of fail. I have run over 20000 rounds of 9mm through my 650.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 7:23:57 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LukeDuke:


Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv
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Originally Posted By LukeDuke:
Originally Posted By Blasternank:
I never thought I'd reload for the 9 mm but now I may. I already have a lot of brass that I've collected over the years and I actually have a set of dillon dies. I was going to set up my 550 or 650 for it, but my question is is I see Lee has a factory crimp die for the 9mm. Do many use them? I use them for my rifle reloads, but have never used them on my pistol reloads. Anyway, any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.


Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv


BS statement. Not true at all.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 8:00:56 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By John87:
yes, mainly as a way to get rid of the "bullet bulge"
View Quote



Hmm. I've never used anything but my RCBS TC die for 9mm. I've always been annoyed by the bullet bulge. For less than $20 if the Lee FCD gets rid of it I just might have to try it out. Thanks!
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 8:08:42 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sabre19:



Hmm. I've never used anything but my RCBS TC die for 9mm. I've always been annoyed by the bullet bulge. For less than $20 if the Lee FCD gets rid of it I just might have to try it out. Thanks!
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Originally Posted By Sabre19:
Originally Posted By John87:
yes, mainly as a way to get rid of the "bullet bulge"



Hmm. I've never used anything but my RCBS TC die for 9mm. I've always been annoyed by the bullet bulge. For less than $20 if the Lee FCD gets rid of it I just might have to try it out. Thanks!

The carbide ring at the bottom of the die is what helps remove it

Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:00:16 AM EST
I use them for all of my pistol rounds
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:17:32 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By John87:

The carbide ring at the bottom of the die is what helps remove it

<a href="http://s1319.photobucket.com/user/_John87/media/Reloading/38_FCD_zps92b93cc3.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1319.photobucket.com/albums/t666/_John87/Reloading/38_FCD_zps92b93cc3.jpg</a>
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Originally Posted By John87:
Originally Posted By Sabre19:
Originally Posted By John87:
yes, mainly as a way to get rid of the "bullet bulge"



Hmm. I've never used anything but my RCBS TC die for 9mm. I've always been annoyed by the bullet bulge. For less than $20 if the Lee FCD gets rid of it I just might have to try it out. Thanks!

The carbide ring at the bottom of the die is what helps remove it

<a href="http://s1319.photobucket.com/user/_John87/media/Reloading/38_FCD_zps92b93cc3.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1319.photobucket.com/albums/t666/_John87/Reloading/38_FCD_zps92b93cc3.jpg</a>


huh, I guess I learned something today, but doesn't the size die do the same thing? I use an RCBS sizer on my 45s and just do the seater/taper crimp at the same time.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:20:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 11:39:54 AM EST by John87]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By delirious1:


huh, I guess I learned something today, but doesn't the size die do the same thing? I use an RCBS sizer on my 45s and just do the seater/taper crimp at the same time.
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Originally Posted By delirious1:
Originally Posted By John87:
Originally Posted By Sabre19:
Originally Posted By John87:
yes, mainly as a way to get rid of the "bullet bulge"



Hmm. I've never used anything but my RCBS TC die for 9mm. I've always been annoyed by the bullet bulge. For less than $20 if the Lee FCD gets rid of it I just might have to try it out. Thanks!

The carbide ring at the bottom of the die is what helps remove it

<a href="http://s1319.photobucket.com/user/_John87/media/Reloading/38_FCD_zps92b93cc3.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i1319.photobucket.com/albums/t666/_John87/Reloading/38_FCD_zps92b93cc3.jpg</a>


huh, I guess I learned something today, but doesn't the size die do the same thing? I use an RCBS sizer on my 45s and just do the seater/taper crimp at the same time.

The size die does resize the brass, but after seating the bullet, the bullet causes a mild bulge and this die helps reduce that bulge

ETA: a before and after of what I am going on about

Link Posted: 7/23/2013 9:21:22 AM EST
Guess I'll be getting one.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 1:02:48 PM EST
I use the Lee FCD's in all of my handgun and rifle reloaded ammunition, it is a simple and quick process that helps me to repeat a consistent neck tension with my reloads.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 2:03:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 3:19:46 PM EST by LukeDuke]
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Originally Posted By BoHeck:


BS statement. Not true at all.
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Originally Posted By BoHeck:
Originally Posted By LukeDuke:

Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv


BS statement. Not true at all.

Originally Posted By wildearp:
Originally Posted By LukeDuke:
Don't do it. You will wear out your shell plate a lot faster that way. They'll replace it when it happens. But then they'll tell you not to use it anymore. Ymmv


The shell plate is hardened steel. A file will not even scratch it. Your statement is full of fail. I have run over 20000 rounds of 9mm through my 650.


I don't even know why I bother coming to the reloading forum anymore. I thought once 1911smith was gone stupid shit would stop but I guess not.

Peace Out.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 2:06:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 2:08:09 PM EST by Spent_Casing]
I do use it for 9mm. Not for 223 though.

And in case anyone doesnt know, crimping does NOTHING for neck tension/setback issues.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 2:09:09 PM EST
Yep, same reasons others have stated - cheap 'insurance' as well as separating the seating and crimping stations.
A better question might be - would you continue to use the FCD if you were reloading on a single stage press? ;)
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:05:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Spent_Casing:
I do use it for 9mm. Not for 223 though.

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I use mine for 9mm, for previously aforementioned reasons (base of case bulge).

Interesting you dont use one for 223. I actually greatly prefer the FCD for 223. Its less sensitive to case length and gives a more consistent crimp in my experience. Obviously only for bullets with cannelure, but lets be honest, on the progressive press, that is 99% of the 223 I load. Ill leave the match and specialty stuff to the single stage.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 5:16:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Blasternank:
I never thought I'd reload for the 9 mm but now I may. I already have a lot of brass that I've collected over the years and I actually have a set of dillon dies. I was going to set up my 550 or 650 for it, but my question is is I see Lee has a factory crimp die for the 9mm. Do many use them? I use them for my rifle reloads, but have never used them on my pistol reloads. Anyway, any info would be appreciated.

Thanks.
View Quote


Not needed with RCBS TC dies IF you have a gun with a fully supported chamber that is not buldging the brass...

Link Posted: 7/23/2013 5:18:32 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 5:35:33 PM EST
Using a set of RCBS carbides for my 9mm, they seems to resize a bit on the small side so some bullet buldge is to be expected. Their taper crimp seems to work well but I honestly don't think I need to use it with this dieset, considering the small resize and very light flare.

I've read some post of Lee FCD's in 9mm crushing plated or lead bullets, so that's something to consider. Try your factory crimp die first and see how you like it.

I do use a FCD in 223 since it seems to accommodate varying length brass nicely. Not to mention it's quick to setup and use.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 5:55:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By dryflash3:

To be honest I didn't understand you post either. Didn't make sense to me. I would appreciate if posters would not call BS in this forum BTW.

I didn't post earlier because I didn't want to pile on.

Do you care to explain what you mean?
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Originally Posted By dryflash3:
<snip>

I don't even know why I bother coming to the reloading forum anymore. I thought once 1911smith was gone stupid shit would stop but I guess not.

Peace Out.

To be honest I didn't understand you post either. Didn't make sense to me. I would appreciate if posters would not call BS in this forum BTW.

I didn't post earlier because I didn't want to pile on.

Do you care to explain what you mean?

Lee fcd puts more stress on the shell plate than a normal crimp die. The shell plates were not designed nor intended to be used with a lee fcd. Ymmv
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 7:57:00 PM EST
If a pistol bullet bulges the brass, and the Lee FCD has a post sizing ring which smooths the bulge, wouldn't that indicate that the bullet is getting deformed inside the brass? Or is the brass bulging away from the bullet, and the Lee FCD is pushing the bulge back in?

I may need to investigate this myself....

Link Posted: 7/24/2013 10:21:03 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 11:31:15 AM EST
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Originally Posted By dryflash3:

You are refering to pistol or rifle FCD's?

I'm just not following how they put more stress on the shellplate.

(not trying to pick a fight)

But any tool can be misused/not adjusted correctly and cause a problem.
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Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Originally Posted By LukeDuke:
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
<snip>

I don't even know why I bother coming to the reloading forum anymore. I thought once 1911smith was gone stupid shit would stop but I guess not.

Peace Out.

To be honest I didn't understand you post either. Didn't make sense to me. I would appreciate if posters would not call BS in this forum BTW.

I didn't post earlier because I didn't want to pile on.

Do you care to explain what you mean?

Lee fcd puts more stress on the shell plate than a normal crimp die. The shell plates were not designed nor intended to be used with a lee fcd. Ymmv

You are refering to pistol or rifle FCD's?

I'm just not following how they put more stress on the shellplate.

(not trying to pick a fight)

But any tool can be misused/not adjusted correctly and cause a problem.

It is most common in the Pistols. Especially 9mm.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 12:24:19 PM EST
I dont understand either.

The shell plate only gets loaded when it pulls the case out of die, right? Basically, the plate makes contact with the rim and all the force pulling the case out of the die is applied there.

The FL sizing die puts more load on the plate than the FCD does, doesnt it? Or am I looking at this wrong?
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 12:25:53 PM EST
Maybe my FC Dies aren't set up right, but I feel a distinct resistance on the downstroke when I use them.

Perhaps this is what LukeDuke was referring to.

I like the FCD a lot. After using the FCD, I've never had a round fail a case gauge, & I've never had a round fail to chamber at the range.
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