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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/4/2005 10:50:36 AM EDT
I am considering purchasing a Remington 870 for home defense; however, I know next to nothing about shotguns in general. Can somebody explain what a choke (choke tube?) is, and how this affects what kind of ammo you can shoot in a particular gun? The model I am looking at has an 18" barrel.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 10:54:02 AM EDT
An 18" for home defense need no choke. jj
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 1:12:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jjrockbush:
An 18" for home defense need no choke. jj



I too am new to shotguns. This answer (above) probably doesn't answer your question, but I'll try the best I can based on what I've learned.

The 'choke' of a shotgun barrel determines the internal tapering at the end of the barrel. Think of it as a constriction towards the end of a barrel. A 'tighter' choke will give you tighter group patterns at 25 yards. (25 yards is the standard of measure for distance when discussing chokes).

There are 4 types/degrees of chokes:
Cylinder Bore (wide open barrel, no choke)
Improved Cylinder (slightly tapered/choked barrel)
Modified (moderately tapered/choked barrel)
Full (very tightly tapered/choked barrel)

The desired amount of depends on the range and size of targets. The tighter the choke, the more effective range you have, as well as the tighter the patterning of your shot at any range. Some barrels come threaded to allow you to change chokes and others are fixed. I have a Remington 870 Police Magnum that has an Improved Cylinder choke (It says IMP CYL on the left side of the barrel, just a little in front of the receiver). If I wanted to change the choke of my barrel, I'd have to change barrels.

Anyway... As is stated above, you don't need a choke, especially for home defense. With an IMP CYL barrel, your effective range is around 25 yards (75 feet), and you'll still maintain 50% of your shot within a 30" circle at 40 yards. Even a cylinder bore an effective range of 20 yards (60 feet) with 40% of your shot maintained within a 30" cirlcle at 40 yards.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 1:51:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By niceguymr:

Originally Posted By jjrockbush:
An 18" for home defense need no choke. jj



I too am new to shotguns. This answer (above) probably doesn't answer your question, but I'll try the best I can based on what I've learned.

The 'choke' of a shotgun barrel determines the internal tapering at the end of the barrel. Think of it as a constriction towards the end of a barrel. A 'tighter' choke will give you tighter group patterns at 25 yards. (25 yards is the standard of measure for distance when discussing chokes).

There are 4 types/degrees of chokes:
Cylinder Bore (wide open barrel, no choke)
Improved Cylinder (slightly tapered/choked barrel)
Modified (moderately tapered/choked barrel)
Full (very tightly tapered/choked barrel)

The desired amount of depends on the range and size of targets. The tighter the choke, the more effective range you have, as well as the tighter the patterning of your shot at any range. Some barrels come threaded to allow you to change chokes and others are fixed. I have a Remington 870 Police Magnum that has an Improved Cylinder choke (It says IMP CYL on the left side of the barrel, just a little in front of the receiver). If I wanted to change the choke of my barrel, I'd have to change barrels.

Anyway... As is stated above, you don't need a choke, especially for home defense. With an IMP CYL barrel, your effective range is around 25 yards (75 feet), and you'll still maintain 50% of your shot within a 30" circle at 40 yards. Even a cylinder bore an effective range of 20 yards (60 feet) with 40% of your shot maintained within a 30" cirlcle at 40 yards.




Like I said....he don't need no choke

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 2:01:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jjrockbush:

Originally Posted By niceguymr:
Anyway... As is stated above, you don't need a choke, especially for home defense.


Like I said....he don't need no choke



I know, I know.

But his question was "Can somebody explain what a choke (choke tube?) is, and how this affects what kind of ammo you can shoot in a particular gun?"

I remember (not very long ago at all) when I had the same question and it took a while before I got a straight up answer and actually understood it.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 3:38:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By niceguymr:

Originally Posted By jjrockbush:
An 18" for home defense need no choke. jj



I too am new to shotguns. This answer (above) probably doesn't answer your question, but I'll try the best I can based on what I've learned.

The 'choke' of a shotgun barrel determines the internal tapering at the end of the barrel. Think of it as a constriction towards the end of a barrel. A 'tighter' choke will give you tighter group patterns at 25 yards. (25 yards is the standard of measure for distance when discussing chokes).

There are 4 types/degrees of chokes:
Cylinder Bore (wide open barrel, no choke)
Improved Cylinder (slightly tapered/choked barrel)
Modified (moderately tapered/choked barrel)
Full (very tightly tapered/choked barrel)

The desired amount of depends on the range and size of targets. The tighter the choke, the more effective range you have, as well as the tighter the patterning of your shot at any range. Some barrels come threaded to allow you to change chokes and others are fixed. I have a Remington 870 Police Magnum that has an Improved Cylinder choke (It says IMP CYL on the left side of the barrel, just a little in front of the receiver). If I wanted to change the choke of my barrel, I'd have to change barrels.

Anyway... As is stated above, you don't need a choke, especially for home defense. With an IMP CYL barrel, your effective range is around 25 yards (75 feet), and you'll still maintain 50% of your shot within a 30" circle at 40 yards. Even a cylinder bore an effective range of 20 yards (60 feet) with 40% of your shot maintained within a 30" cirlcle at 40 yards.



Thank you, that makes sense. But can slugs be shot out of a shotgun with a choke, or can slugs only be shot out of a cylinder bore?
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 5:53:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 6:45:31 PM EDT
Also, on your question regarding slug use, you probably would be hard pressed to find a "home defense" need for slugs. At least within the house. At most inside the house distances eaven heavy bird shot is enough to stop an assailant, as you are still hitting them with a full ounce of lead all at once. the smaller shot size also has the advantage of minimizing damage on the other side of dry wall and other comon construction material. This way any of the family members inside the house will be in less danger from projectiles that may make it through a wall.

Now, if you live out in the country where you may have to cover distances greater than 20 yards, slugs may prove useful.

I personally have a ammo taper loaded in my shotgun, starting with #4 bird shot, then #4 buck, then 00 Buck, with a couple of slugs in the last loops of the shell carrier if averything else failed.

Just something else to consider.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:47:16 PM EDT
Many self claimed experts say the best load for home defense distance is 1 buck. Any bigger and you lose total pellet count and might shoot thru someone. Any lighter and you might not penetrate to the vitals because shot disperses quickly in flesh.

Just what I've heard.

My own weapon of choice is a Winchester 1300 Defender with 3-1buck, 2-00 Buck, 2-000-buck, and then one slug. Also I have a shell carrier onboard with 5 slugs in case I need one earlier I can cycle in.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:59:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GreenTalon:
My own weapon of choice is a Winchester 1300 Defender with 3-1buck, 2-00 Buck, 2-000-buck, and then one slug. .



Is this order correct or maybe I'm misunderstanding? Wouldn't it be #1, then 000, then 00, then slug? I'm not trying to be nitpicky here, I've just never thought about tapering the loads before reading this thread and I think it's a great idea.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:20:40 PM EDT
gave us a call...maybe we can be help you out or see us at ironridgeguns.com.take care
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:56:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By niceguymr:
Wouldn't it be #1, then 000, then 00, then slug? I'm not trying to be nitpicky here, I've just never thought about tapering the loads before reading this thread and I think it's a great idea.


Nope, 000 is bigger than 00, is bigger than 0, is bigger than #1, is bigger than #4 and so on and so forth.

Eric
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 9:02:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eric10mm:

Originally Posted By niceguymr:
Wouldn't it be #1, then 000, then 00, then slug? I'm not trying to be nitpicky here, I've just never thought about tapering the loads before reading this thread and I think it's a great idea.


Nope, 000 is bigger than 00, is bigger than 0, is bigger than #1, is bigger than #4 and so on and so forth.

Eric



You are correct sir. Sorry for the misunderstanding. I had to pull out my winchester shotshell game guide to getmyself back on track.
Link Posted: 9/8/2005 2:11:01 PM EDT
If tapering the loads doesn't seem to be working in stopping a target, then aim for the pelvis. There are a lot of critical nerves, arteries and veins in this area and most body armor doesn't cover this area well enough. Also, since this is the big support interface for legs and spine, if there is enough structural damage to the skeleton in this area the target cannot stand up. This makes them much less of a threat.

Stopping power, once again, is not just about power but shot placement as well.
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