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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 3/19/2006 9:41:37 AM EST
After spending this morning in a level III all kevlar vest I have to say that the weight wasn't too bad, but the heat will kill a person. I was wearing under armor and a T shirt under the vest and I was starting to sweat while running a CHL class in our indoor range and it was about 80* in the range.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:37:07 AM EST
Welcome to the Suck.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:46:01 AM EST
just wait till you start adding plates (front and back) at like 4.5 lbs apiece and then the new side plates at 2.5 apiece. THat is an extra almost 15lbs and it doesn't breathe
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:51:48 AM EST
the weight didnt bother me at all it was jsut the fact that it doesn't breathe. I felt like I was roasting from the inside out. Reminded me of those days wearing my football gear and practicing in the dead heat of summer.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 9:04:34 AM EST
Try running an obstacle course with body armor and jungle boots. That really is the suck, but it does get you somewhat used to it.....as much as you can get used to it.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 9:40:23 AM EST
They have those 'ribbed' shirts that supposedly let the air flow to cool you. Has anyone tried them? Do they work?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 10:19:37 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 1:26:32 PM EST
hydration carriers is most imortant!!!
it adds more weight and heatfactor but, gotta keep hydrated.
i run lev IV , standalone plates and know what you're talking about. undrarmour does help. imho....
you lose alot of fluids just to have them plates in.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:39:54 PM EST
I actually notice a difference between tshirts and Underarmor type shirts when worn under armor. Personaly I like the 5.11 shirts; my armor doesn't seem to slip around as much with them
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:43:09 PM EST
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:19:53 PM EST
I've got a Champion undershirt that is of the same concept as the UA and 5.11 (cost me $11 at Target) and I could tell a huge difference between it and a regular cotton undershirt.

Armor is heavy, and really adds up quickly. My TT IBA with IIIA panels, front and rear III plates and various pouches (including hydro) weighs in at a whopping 45 lbs! The load out is 8 - 30 round mags, 6-40mm rounds, 6-shotgun rounds, 2 pistol mags, strobe, flashbang, smoke, blow out kit, radio, hydro and gas mask. The GM is coming off (makes me even wider than a house) but that won't save that much. I figure I'll be at 42 lbs when all is said an done.

That's a lot of heavy gear for a Chairborne Ranger!
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:27:03 PM EST
If you can get some air circulated under the vest, it helps. My 5.11 heat gear does help over regular cotton but it's still soaking wet after 8 hours.

Plastic polyester pants suck major ass.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:59:06 PM EST
it would be nice to have air circulating but i just dont see it happening with how snug it fit on me.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:38:48 PM EST
try mopp gear. armor makes me feel like a hot baked potato in foil.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:17:23 AM EST

Originally Posted By infsqdldr:
try mopp gear. armor makes me feel like a hot baked potato in foil.



Ain't that the truth!!

Body armor is hot, but NBC suits are like a Sauna. I do not miss that.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:29:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By Hoplite:

Originally Posted By Vector_Joe:
They have those 'ribbed' shirts that supposedly let the air flow to cool you. Has anyone tried them? Do they work?

gimmick. i felt the same with underarmor or a cotton shirt under my armor since the moisture really has no where to go. tried both the loose and heat(tight) gear shirts with the same result. ribbing wont to anything in my opinion



I was thinking of something like this:



But I guess if it is totally compressed under the vest, it isn't going to make much difference.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:40:59 AM EST
100% cotton is a bad idea, but the cheap $10 generic polyester blends work every bit as good as the "under armor" stuff.

Under armor was developed for athletics - every other "use" is just innovative marketing, not product design or function. they were not designed to be worn under, well, armor. Personally, they really mess with my skin after about 5 hours - not an issue with football players.

Of course, I say that about their t-shirts, but I think underarmor boxers are the shiznit.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 7:01:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/22/2006 7:03:39 AM EST by Colt_SBR]
I've had three vest issued from work.

I wore the firsts vest every day for a 1 ½ years. I didn't mind the extra weight. It wasn't bad. I got use to the restrictive movement. I was so use to it, I never even noticed I was wearing it. My problem is, I was sick every day. I work midnights and it still kept the heat in. My t-shirt was soaked all the time (11.5 hrs).

They got me a better vest. The carrier was made to allow air between your under shirt and the vest. I wore that vest for six months. Same problem. I was sick every day.

They gave me a third vest. This vest was billed as the best vest ever. I wore that one for about three months. Same problem. The third vest was included in a vest recall so I turned it, for replacement, to the Captain. That was about 1 ½ years ago. I’m still waiting for the replacement.

The Captain tried to issue my recalled vest to an officer and he wouldn’t take it because of the recall. He ended up issuing the recall vest to a new hire. He’s wearing it today.

Most officers wear vests every day and don’t have problems. My hat is off to them. I’d would wear one, without being sick every day, if I could. I never take time off of work evern when I'm sick.


______________________________



Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:27:32 AM EST
You can appreciate it in the winter though. I never minded wearing mine in Germany cold season.
Summer... yeah it pretty well sucks ass.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 8:44:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 8:45:03 AM EST by Adam_White]

Originally Posted By pathfinder74:
You can appreciate it in the winter though. I never minded wearing mine in Germany cold season.
Summer... yeah it pretty well sucks ass.



Yours must have been big enough to fit over your cold / wet weather gear, then? It REALLY sucks when your layering is limited to what you can fit under the vest - you can get really cold arms (at least your core stays a little warmer) and really wet.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:33:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By Vector_Joe:

Originally Posted By Hoplite:

Originally Posted By Vector_Joe:
They have those 'ribbed' shirts that supposedly let the air flow to cool you. Has anyone tried them? Do they work?

gimmick. i felt the same with underarmor or a cotton shirt under my armor since the moisture really has no where to go. tried both the loose and heat(tight) gear shirts with the same result. ribbing wont to anything in my opinion



I was thinking of something like this:

www.pinnaclearmor.com/images/rib-v.jpg

But I guess if it is totally compressed under the vest, it isn't going to make much difference.



I was warned off of them by a formal co-worker who said that he couldn't feel any difference as far as air circulation and that the ribs break down or worse if they have a polymer base for the rib, they poke you.

I have found that the best thing that works for me is a good body powder, and change & wash the carrier at least daily after wear.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:48:16 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/23/2006 2:56:50 PM EST by Scollins]
How about his setup?




Offers portability and easily contolled cooling at the touch of a finger. One hour of cooling time. Compact, convenient and instantaneous comfort. This system is used when there is no room for a cooler
One (CW-size) COOL SHIRT tm with soft tubing and connectors for maximum comfort
One (CH) Can Holder
One (KK-C) 12 oz Freeze Spray Can



$180 and additional cooling cans are $11. I wonder if you could load up your Camelbak with ice water and a small pump to run through the system? Probably wouldn't last very long though, even with an insulated Camelbak.....

I bet this system could easily be retrofitted into things like cop cars, Humvees, etc. I imagine the military already has a similar setup.....

Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:54:04 PM EST
Nice idea, just don't get shot in that, or you'll have freeze spray stuff all over, although that might be quite funny.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 2:58:33 PM EST
I always calculated that my vest had roughly the same insulative qualities as a medium-weight sweatshirt, but less breathable. Not so bad in the winter, it saves me a layer or two, but highly sucky in the summer.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 3:51:57 PM EST
it wouldnt be bad at all as long as there could be some circulation. I could just feel myself starting to warm up and feel the moisture building.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 4:01:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By Scollins:
How about his setup?

www.apexperformance.net/cartgenie/images/large/dsc_0073.jpg


Offers portability and easily contolled cooling at the touch of a finger. One hour of cooling time. Compact, convenient and instantaneous comfort. This system is used when there is no room for a cooler
One (CW-size) COOL SHIRT tm with soft tubing and connectors for maximum comfort
One (CH) Can Holder
One (KK-C) 12 oz Freeze Spray Can



$180 and additional cooling cans are $11. I wonder if you could load up your Camelbak with ice water and a small pump to run through the system? Probably wouldn't last very long though, even with an insulated Camelbak.....

I bet this system could easily be retrofitted into things like cop cars, Humvees, etc. I imagine the military already has a similar setup.....




We've got 'em for Bio Hazard suits and such - they aren't very practical without a built in compressor / refrigeration unit - Definitely not practical for field gear.

Vehicles are better off with traditional AC systems.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 1:37:45 PM EST
I got out before the Interceptors - we were still wearing the older style frag vests. Now I'm a LEO and I wear a Zero-G Gold level II. I really like it. IMHO, the Underarmor type shirts - especially the tight fitting ones - do make alot of difference. I have also found the tight fitting "Dry- Duke" shirts they are selling in Military Clothing Sales stores to be a good product - and cheaper than the Underarmor brand shirts.



-K
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 6:37:25 PM EST
IBA and gear: 67lbs fully loaded.....115+ degrees......Nuff said.
hug.gif
Link Posted: 4/8/2006 8:51:57 PM EST
i thought football gear was bad in 110* heat with 90% humidity
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 12:57:18 PM EST
Its not that bad when you do it everyday for a year in temps ranging from 40- 140 F. What gets bad is wearing the vest with plates, helmet, 6 loaded mags minimum, two full canteens, a full camelbak, first aid kit, radio, nvgs, gps, lots of spare batteries, and poguey bait. Thats not bad at all, imagine the M240 guys or the 11Cs with mortar tubes, baseplates, stands, and sights. I cant wait to go again...
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 1:08:31 PM EST
After our initial convoy into Iraq my Brigade had like a half dozen people get their appendictses(?) removed. Guess thats what you get for riding those plates on fat nasty Nat. Guard bellies.
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 4:45:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/9/2006 4:46:29 PM EST by NonConformist]
Vests are REAL fun in Florida when its a 100 Degrees with 95% humidity, wearing all black and on Foot all day
Link Posted: 4/9/2006 4:53:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By NonConformist:
Vests are REAL fun in Florida when its a 100 Degrees with 95% humidity, wearing all black and on Foot all day


sounds like home, good ole gulf coast
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 8:40:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By BadSVT:
After spending this morning in a level III all kevlar vest I have to say that the weight wasn't too bad, but the heat will kill a person. I was wearing under armor and a T shirt under the vest and I was starting to sweat while running a CHL class in our indoor range and it was about 80* in the range.



Bear in mind that when you wear armor you must, "Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!" And when you are done hydrating, you should, "Hydrate some more!" See, Drill Sargent....I did learn something in the Army
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 8:57:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By BadSVT:
After spending this morning in a level III all kevlar vest I have to say that the weight wasn't too bad, but the heat will kill a person. I was wearing under armor and a T shirt under the vest and I was starting to sweat while running a CHL class in our indoor range and it was about 80* in the range.



Why did you have to wear a vest?
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 9:00:52 AM EST
very confined space with old people and novices handeling hot firearms...
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 11:53:43 AM EST
The longer I wore the shit the more I felt like taking it off. It was kindof like Iraq's never ending summer- by the time 9 months of summer are over you are vomitously sick to death of them- just like the armor.

It might not be so bad on a six month rotation.

Link Posted: 4/14/2006 3:59:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By BadSVT:
very confined space with old people and novices handeling hot firearms...



Did the instructor(s) make you or was it voluntary?
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 4:09:54 PM EST
I'm a RSO during CHL quals.
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 5:21:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By BadSVT:
I'm a RSO during CHL quals.



Dig it! Our CCW classes/requals here are scary shit! Lots of Old timers and such!

Instructor: Does everyone have ear protection?

Old guy: HUH?

I promptly bust out laughing!


or the other one....

Instructor: At the command of FIRE.....

Other old guy: BANG, BANG! , BANG!

DAMN!
Link Posted: 4/14/2006 5:33:31 PM EST
thats exactly why all of us wear armor while in the range during quals. I personally wear a level III vest
Link Posted: 4/15/2006 8:23:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/15/2006 8:28:46 PM EST by Green0]
"Instructor: Does everyone have ear protection?

Old guy: HUH?"

Ah the hard- I mean dumbass.

I watched a toasted guy on his indoor range unload a 357 without ear plugs.

It was painful to watch- really it was. He can still hear though so I guess he didn't totally deafen himself. Some people get lucky like that.

" After our initial convoy into Iraq my Brigade had like a half dozen people get their appendictses(?) removed. Guess thats what you get for riding those plates on fat nasty Nat. Guard bellies."


That's interesting. I wonder how many of them had that class where some active guy reccomends someone [or two] cinch your IBA up like a damn girdle. I never listened to that- I like being able to breath and shit.

I don't see how it being really tight is going to change the way it stops something. There are some fat slobs in the guard, but that isn't a characteristic of the entire guard- or even 90% of it. I really think the Army should get with the program and either chapter out the dead weight or give them mandatory lyposuction. It's a real drain on training to be dealing with terribly fat soldiers.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 7:52:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/16/2006 7:54:54 PM EST by BlueCrusader]

Originally Posted By Vector_Joe:

They have those 'ribbed' shirts that supposedly let the air flow to cool you. Has anyone tried them? Do they work?



gimmick. i felt the same with underarmor or a cotton shirt under my armor since the moisture really has no where to go. tried both the loose and heat(tight) gear shirts with the same result. ribbing wont to anything in my opinion

I was thinking of something like this:



But I guess if it is totally compressed under the vest, it isn't going to make much difference.

Yes. They Suck.

The ribs absorb a SHITLOAD of sweat. After four hours, you STINK! I have tried everything...UnderArmor HeatGear etc etc etc.

A plain, cotton t-shirt is what I wear these days and honestly, there isn't really a noticeable differnce between that and all the high-dollar stuff.

110+ in PHNX + black poly uniforms = roast pig.

Which is why I refuse to work any shift but nights.



BC
Link Posted: 4/17/2006 1:51:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 4/17/2006 1:52:12 AM EST by Unicorn]
I've found the wicking t-shirts do help. The moisture can't evaporate directuly since it's blocked by the vest, but it does wick the moisture to areas like the sleeves that aren't covered, and it does evaporate there.
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