Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/29/2004 4:04:08 PM EST
I have ZERO experience with modifying firearms, but I'd really like to build myself a custom 10/22. I'll probably go with all Volquartsen parts (barrel, stock, trigger), but I'm a bit worried. I want this gun to feel like it came from the factory - not like some asshole threw it together in his garage. How difficult is this fit and finish to obtain? Would I be better off going to a gunsmith or ordering the rifle complete from Volquartsen?

Thanks for the help.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 4:33:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 4:35:36 PM EST by SHIPSNIPE1]
All the parts you mention are drop in. Yeah, you could have a gunsmith install them for you or buy the whole shebang but you would still have ZERO experience. The 10/22 is a great place to start and probably "the'' easiest rifle to upgrade. Cheaper than many to make mistakes on. The only things that really need gunsmith installation are: some scope mounts, aftermarket receivers, threaded barrels, unfinished stocks.

Added: You can buy every part aftermarket.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:11:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 6:14:04 PM EST by 2xsl_1998]
Don't sweat it. The 10/22 is about the easiest rifle you can imagine to put together! I just built one with a Volquartsen THM barrel and Triggerguard 2000. It took me about 15 minutes to build the entire rifle from a pile of parts!

Note-the barrel was very hard to get on. I tapped it in to start with a rubber hammer and then pulled it the rest of the way on with the v-block on the receiver. This was the most difficult part of the entire assembly.

The trigger assembly is held in with two pins that you can push in by hand. There is also a large pin in the rear of the receiver that acts as a "buffer" for the bolt assembly. You need to put this pin in after you install the bolt.

Installing the bolt is a little tricky but not too difficult. You need to install the cocking handle and spring first. Then you have to pull it slightly to the rear as you slide the bolt in. The bolt has a notch that the handle has to fit in. It's not too hard, but you have to fiddle with it to get it just right. You'll see what I mean when you try.

Once you have the barrel and trigger assembly in, you just drop the action into the stock. There is only one screw that holds it into the stock.

So in summary, the rifle has three screws and three pins holding it together. This doesn't count your scope mount. I used the Volquartsen cantilever on mine. It's held on by two allen screws that mount to the barrel.

Good luck! Mine shoots great!

edited to add: heres a schematic at Brownell's that illustrates how all the parts fit together www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/schematics/schemmfg.aspx?schemid=56&m=13&mn=Ruger%c2%ae&model=Model+10%2f22+R%2c+RB+
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 10:58:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By 2xsl_1998:
Note-the barrel was very hard to get on. I tapped it in to start with a rubber hammer and then pulled it the rest of the way on with the v-block on the receiver. This was the most difficult part of the entire assembly.



Next time try heating the receiver with a hair dryer or heat gun, chill the barrel by putting it in the freezer for a few minutes, the receiver will expand and the barrel will contract minutely; put 'em together. Physics. Enjoy.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 7:38:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By TargetNick:
I have ZERO experience with modifying firearms, but I'd really like to build myself a custom 10/22. I'll probably go with all Volquartsen parts (barrel, stock, trigger), but I'm a bit worried. I want this gun to feel like it came from the factory - not like some asshole threw it together in his garage. How difficult is this fit and finish to obtain? Would I be better off going to a gunsmith or ordering the rifle complete from Volquartsen?

Thanks for the help.


BIY!!
Check out Rimfire Central.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 12:25:45 PM EST
EASY, you can do it......

and watch out, there are TONS of stuff out there, and you can spend alot of money before you know it.....
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 1:20:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By 2xsl_1998:



Installing the bolt is a little tricky but not too difficult. You need to install the cocking handle and spring first. Then you have to pull it slightly to the rear as you slide the bolt in. The bolt has a notch that the handle has to fit in. It's not too hard, but you have to fiddle with it to get it just right. You'll see what I mean when you try.







This part is kind of a PITA. If you have mastered a way to do this without crushing your fingers a couple of times, my hats off to you, sir.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 2:37:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 2:38:27 PM EST by Gimme_A_Carbine]
10/22, great and super easy. This was my first project. I used the Volquartsen SSS for Aguila's 60gr SSS rounds. It was WAY too tight. I tapped it in, but was worried that forcing it any further would possibly split/crack the reciever. I (with great effort) removed the barrel from the reciever, and w/ great fear took the Dremel w/ sanding tube to the reciever (the original complete gun cost less than the barrel by at least 1/2, so I chose to grind that rather than the barrel. I was only 16, and lacking wisdom, didnt think about heating and cooling it. I only ground away the tiniest bit, just so it would fit really tightly, but w/o using 400lbs of force to shove it in. It shoots great.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 6:15:19 PM EST
Honestly, to save yourself a lot of time, I would just purchase a Volquartsen rifle outright instead of ending up and coming back to purchasing Volquartsen parts or spending more and purchasing the Volquartsen parts individually. The only disadvantige to it is it takes all the fun out of building them.

The bolt/charging handle is easy to assemble with practice. Just do not listen to the Ruger Manual and use a SCREWDRIVER to hold back the charging handle. Trust me on this.

Sammy


Originally Posted By TargetNick:
I have ZERO experience with modifying firearms, but I'd really like to build myself a custom 10/22. I'll probably go with all Volquartsen parts (barrel, stock, trigger), but I'm a bit worried. I want this gun to feel like it came from the factory - not like some asshole threw it together in his garage. How difficult is this fit and finish to obtain? Would I be better off going to a gunsmith or ordering the rifle complete from Volquartsen?

Thanks for the help.

Link Posted: 8/31/2004 6:23:18 PM EST
I did one up when I was 14.
Link Posted: 8/31/2004 6:30:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
I did one up when I was 14.



Oh, shit, well if you can do it, I sure as hell can!


Thanks for all the info, guys. I'd really like to take a shot at this myself just to get a little experience. There is a gun shop near me that is very good about giving advice and help, so I'm sure they can give me a little direction if I get stuck. I'll probably start ordering parts sometime here in the next couple months!
Link Posted: 9/2/2004 5:46:20 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 9:28:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By TargetNick:

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
I did one up when I was 14.



Oh, shit, well if you can do it, I sure as hell can!


Thanks for all the info, guys. I'd really like to take a shot at this myself just to get a little experience. There is a gun shop near me that is very good about giving advice and help, so I'm sure they can give me a little direction if I get stuck. I'll probably start ordering parts sometime here in the next couple months!



Yep Its pretty easy. 1GUNRUNNER still has it, after my brotehr left it at a shoot 18 months ago.
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 9:29:50 PM EST
Hey, Shadowblade, thatt gun looks like some asshole through it together in his garage!
Link Posted: 9/3/2004 9:54:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
Hey, Shadowblade, thatt gun looks like some asshole through it together in his garage!



ROFL. I agree. What kind of low rent shit is that? ;)
Link Posted: 9/4/2004 2:13:50 AM EST
Top Top