Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 8/24/2013 3:21:33 PM EDT
I'm so excited...this will be my first safe. The amazing thing is that I ordered it from Home Depot on Thursday this week, and received a shipping confirmation email and phone call, stating that it will arrive at my house on Monday; that's what I call FAST shipping! (Note: if you purchase from HD, be sure to call their Online Customer Service group and speak to a Supervisor, to request a price match. The stated pricing on their website is close to MSRP).






I haven't decided whether I'm going to secure it to the garage floor concrete yet. I'm still researching pros/cons for that, and unfortunately, I have a post-tension slab.

















Specs:






  • Fire rated for 2.5 hours at 1400 degrees


  • UL listed RSC for burglary protection


  • 28 long gun capacity


  • High security UL listed (la gard) electronic lock


  • 14 massive solid steel 2 in. locking bolts


  • Extra hard drill resistant hard plate


  • Chamberlain disc protects lock from drilling


  • Auxiliary relocker protects physical attacks on lock


  • Solid steel 10-gauge body construction


  • Five layers of fireboard in the door and four layers in the body


  • Double layer of palusol heat expandable door seal


  • Door panel organizer to hold pistols and additional valuables


  • Power docking sSystem (PDS) -(2) 110v power outlets with ethernet and USB


  • MFG Model # : L-6030-26-7-E


  • MFG Part # : L-6030-26-7-E



 
Link Posted: 8/24/2013 4:09:46 PM EDT
nice safe
Link Posted: 8/25/2013 7:01:06 PM EDT
Much better safe than the Silverado for not much more money.
And the Legacy has a 1/4 inch of plate steel in the door.
Taking of tomorrow for delivery??
Link Posted: 8/26/2013 5:22:19 AM EDT
Safe dealers around here will NOT drill into a post tensioned foundation.  Rather, they use adhesive to secure the safe to the floor.
Link Posted: 8/26/2013 8:41:46 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

....Taking of tomorrow for delivery??
View Quote




 
*grin*, yes. Although I was told by the local dispatch that the truck would arrive around 1pm today, it did not; surprised right? :)




I'm happy to say that it's now installed at my residence, whooohhooooo, and I love it.
Link Posted: 8/26/2013 8:44:00 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Safe dealers around here will NOT drill into a post tensioned foundation.  Rather, they use adhesive to secure the safe to the floor.
View Quote




 
After reading and researching more into this whole 'post-tension' issue, there's no way I'm going to risk it. So, now I'm researching various adhesive options. Thanks for the heads up.






Link Posted: 8/27/2013 8:02:52 AM EDT
There are a variety of epoxy adhesives used in construction for attaching metal to masonry.  There can be significant differences in their rated strength in "tension" (pulling force exerted straight up / lift), vs. strength under "shear" (twisting/torsion/pushing).   However, the most significant consideration in anchoring a safe with epoxy (or other adhesives) is the permanent nature of the installation.  If the adhesive is strong enough to resist forcible removal of the safe, you may never be able to move that safe without demolition of the substrate or destruction of the safe.

Perhaps epoxy adhering a steel plate (or plates) with threaded studs to the slab, allowing the safe to be bolted to the anchor plate(s)?
Link Posted: 8/27/2013 8:39:17 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Perhaps epoxy adhering a steel plate (or plates) with threaded studs to the slab, allowing the safe to be bolted to the anchor plate(s)?
View Quote


This is a common method in commercial installations. Actually, J-B Weld is an excellent adhesive for this purpose, with the right properties to bond steel to concrete.


Link Posted: 8/27/2013 9:05:07 AM EDT
I don't know if I have told the story about the liquid nail on here before.

We bought several safes from a chain of defunct hardware stores.  One of these stores had a drop safe where they had built it into the wall, half of it sticking out on either side.  The drop compartment was on the outside, and the safe door was inside the cash room.  Since they were tearing the building down, damage was not a concern.  We sawed the wall from around the safe, and as we tore it apart, realized that they had simply liquid nailed the wood studs directly to the safe.

After getting the wall out of the way, we opened up the safe to unbolt it.  To our surprise, there were no bolts, yet the safe wouldn't budge.  We put blocks against it and hit it with a sledge.  We put a johnson bar under the hinge and stood on it.  It wouldn't move.  I finally brought in our forklift.  We pressed againt it gently, and the forklift spun its wheels.  I bumped into it with a bit more force, and it finally popped loose.  Actually, it didn't pop loose.  The glue holding the commercial vinyl tile to the floor gave way.  The tile was still glued securely to  the safe.  Upon close inspection, we determined that it was the same liquid nail.  It made a heck of of a bond between the steel and the vinyl tile.



Link Posted: 9/10/2013 5:17:40 PM EDT
that safe looks like it was made by the same people who made my field and stream safe I got from dicks
Top Top