Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 4/28/2004 1:57:42 PM EST
I'd love nothing more than to have a Marlin 45-70 or a 30-30 with black furniture...

but I don't think it exists...

Anyone know any better?
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 2:48:51 PM EST
Check Cabelas. They have black polymer lever action stocks and forearms.

JH94
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 3:06:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/28/2004 3:07:08 PM EST by QuinlanV]


RAM-LINE
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 3:48:20 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 4:25:05 PM EST
Yep, ram line has it. Had a marlin 30\30 with their black syn. and it was great, very comfortable.
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 5:34:24 PM EST
I want a lever gun with a folding stock though!
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 6:56:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By Juell:
I want a lever gun with a folding stock though!




And a flash suppressor?
Link Posted: 4/28/2004 7:44:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By Juell:
I want a lever gun with a folding stock though!




And a flash suppressor?



And a specialized Surefire light forestock!
Link Posted: 4/29/2004 5:13:43 AM EST
Boy, it's getting deep now.
Link Posted: 4/30/2004 10:15:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By Lazyshooter:

Originally Posted By Spade:

Originally Posted By Juell:
I want a lever gun with a folding stock though!




And a flash suppressor?



And a specialized Surefire light forestock!



I think you guys are just joking but you got my wheels turning.
Throw a scout mount and aimpoint in that package and I'd be all over it. Seriously. Especialy in .45-70 Gov.

They make it for pump shotguns, why not for lever actions too.
Link Posted: 5/1/2004 7:31:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 5/1/2004 7:34:05 AM EST by Lumpy196]
www.wildwestguns.com/



...and Ted Yost makes some kick ass "tactical" lever guns

www.yost-bonitz.com/photos/45-70/


Link Posted: 5/1/2004 8:12:47 AM EST
Whoa I love that lever action pistol or AOW or rifle. What is that gun? And is that sawed off stock legal on a rifle. A Winchester 94 Trapper to be exact.
Link Posted: 5/1/2004 8:39:22 AM EST
both are Marlins in .45-70.
Link Posted: 5/1/2004 9:26:56 AM EST

Originally Posted By 223spree:
Whoa I love that lever action pistol or AOW or rifle. What is that gun? And is that sawed off stock legal on a rifle. A Winchester 94 Trapper to be exact.



Short Barreled Rifle according to their website. In order for it to be considered a pistol it would have to be built on a virgin receiver that never had a rifle barrel or buttstock mounted.
On a standard Winchester M94 Trapper the 'sawed off' stock should be legal as long as the overall length was still 26" or more.
Link Posted: 5/1/2004 10:35:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By brewsky101:
I think you guys are just joking but you got my wheels turning.
Throw a scout mount and aimpoint in that package and I'd be all over it. Seriously. Especialy in .45-70 Gov.

They make it for pump shotguns, why not for lever actions too.



XO makes the Lever Scout Rail system for mounting scout scopes. it uses the rear sight dovetail and the tapped holes in the receiver.
Link Posted: 5/1/2004 11:22:31 AM EST
Now Ive got myself like the idea of a .45-70 lever gun more than ever.

CLICK CLICK BOOM
Link Posted: 5/1/2004 6:32:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By Lumpy196:
Now Ive got myself like the idea of a .45-70 lever gun more than ever.

CLICK CLICK BOOM



Same here. Especially after seeing that 3rd pic, with the wood stock. Too sweet!
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 4:47:25 AM EST
This whole thread is really sad.

Horrors never seem to end and there is nothing sacred anymore.
Link Posted: 5/2/2004 2:30:01 PM EST
Good-bye tactical slug gun.


HELLO .45-70 tactical lever gun.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 4:30:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/3/2004 4:40:54 PM EST by IronBalaclava]
Now those Marlins are REFRESHING.

Simply classic! Didn't know whether to bow or laugh my ass off at first.
That's the best thing since cassette decks.

That'll raise eyebrows at any range from whomever happens to be shooting!




edit: eh?,waitaminute...why does my non-paying ass have an team avatar panel under my screen name?

Is this like the Army with the whole black beret thing, or do I have some kind of secret admirer?
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 5:06:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By sig_230:
This whole thread is really sad.

Horrors never seem to end and there is nothing sacred anymore.




Nah, think of it from the "scout" rifle concept.
Makes sense to me.
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 5:38:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By sig_230:
This whole thread is really sad.

Horrors never seem to end and there is nothing sacred anymore.



If it makes you feel anybetter, I got a 336 just to have something in my collection that harkens back to days of yore. When I bought it, even my muzzleloaders were dressed in black (not on purpose, just how they happened to come).
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 6:37:34 PM EST
LOL!!!

I just learned more about lever actions than I ever thought possible. Cool stuff.


lmao...tactical lever actions...I love this website!
Link Posted: 5/3/2004 7:19:06 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:
lmao...tactical lever actions...I love this website!



www.suarezinternational.com/leveraction.html



Ask any student of small arms to name the most typically American rifle and chances are that they will name the .30-30 lever action rifle. Manufactured for over a century by Marlin, Winchester, and others - the lever action invokes images of the Old West. We see Jimmy Stewart in "Winchester '73" smiting the enemies of justice and freedom with his "repeater". We see John Wayne admonishing his adversaries to "fill their hands" as he gallops forward, a stubby Winchester in each hand. And, of course, we see photos of that most American of presidents - Theodore Roosevelt wielding his lever action against all manner of beasties in Africa. This ubiquitous and understated weapon has played a very major role in this country's history.

Today the lever action is most often seen in the hands of close range deer hunters as a brush gun. It is not likely to be the first weapon that comes to our minds when the talk turns to fighting. But make no mistake friends, as a fighting (anti-personnel) weapon, the lever action is just as useful and deadly today, on a lonely stretch of highway in the bad part of town, as it was in the dusty cow towns of the Kansas Territory more than a century ago.

Today a rifle of this sort might be kept in tactical storage in a hall closet, above the hearth, or in the trunk of a car for unexpected social unpleasantries. In such a role the lever action has several advantages over other weapons that are more commonly thought of as fighting tools.

Primarily, the lever action is inexpensive. Used examples in perfect working condition may be had for about a hundred bucks. Even brand new weapons will set you back less than the price of a night on the town for two. Compare that with the price of a more military-like, and hopefully still legal, Sturmgewehr-fighting rifle (If you can find one for sale these days)!

The ammunition (.30-30 Winchester Centerfire) has all the characteristics desirable in a mid-range fighting rifle cartridge. In fact, the ballistics of the .30-30 cartridge are amazingly similar to those for the most specifically designed fighting cartridge of all, the 7.62X39 Russian chambered in the AK-47. Shot for shot, the .30-30 will do everything you could ask from a mid-range tactical rifle. And it will do these things far better than many military weapons will!

Being "sporting guns", lever actions are usually issued with fairly good triggers which are crisp and conducive to hitting. Even if the trigger action is rough on some pieces, it is a simple matter to have it brought up to speed by a gunsmith. Additionally, you'd have to look long and hard to find a gunsmith that isn't familiar with the lever action lock-work. This is certainly more than we can say about the gritty as-issued, or modified triggers of the various SKS, AK, HK etc.

Finally, the lever action rifle is more compact in its 16 inch barrel configuration than most other rifles that might be chosen to fill the role. Equally important in this age of sensitive, touchie-feelie, freedom hating communist politicians, it looks innocent. Don't dismiss this last attribute too easily. In our troubled and ignorant times, juries release violent murderers and rapists because they are not intelligent enough to discern the real facts from the spun fiction. If you live in an Oppressed State, such things as a bayonet lug or a 30 round magazine from East Germany may confuse them enough to change your life's plans...drastically.

The standard .30-30 will suffice as issued for most duties. But enhancement may be undertaken to improve its performance. One area where improvements may be made is the sights. These weapons are issued with the old buckhorn type sights. They will do just fine, but a rear ghost ring aperture sight with its accompanying front sight post will, in my opinion, do much better. These are available from various sources.

My .30-30 carbine has a modified 1903-A3 rear sight whose aperture has been opened up to ghost ring configuration. This rear sight, coupled with a ROBAR front sight at the end of the barrel, works very well indeed.

Also useful is a leather butt-cuff. This keeps extra ammunition on the weapon itself. This may compromise the concept of the light carbine, but if you have to grab the rifle and run out of your house at 0'dark 30 one night to repel the Visigoths, you'll be glad the extra ammo was there. I know that I was always glad to have a few extras!

Winchester still provides their lever action rifle in the "Wrangler" 16 inch barrel configuration. Marlin once made a similar model called the "Marauder". If your fighting lever gun is too long, it is a simple matter to have your excess barrel lopped off at the local gunsmithy (make certain it remains at least 16" long to keep "you know who" away). Such a conversion will greatly enhance handling, as well as keep the spirit of the compact weapon.

I thus modified an old Marlin 336 rifle that I rescued from the used gun rack at the local gun store. Total cost of the entire package was less than two hundred bucks (including a nice 4X Leupold scope, which I eventually mounted on another rifle!). It is short, light, hard hitting, rugged, cheap to replace if necessary...and well, it looks innocent. I obtained a supply of hunting grade PMC 150 grain .30-30 ammo and tested the combative utility of the carbine via a series of rifle exercises from Suarez International's Rifle Gunfighting school. The drills involve both close range reactive shooting as well as longer distances possible in combative encounters. For purposes of uniformity, all drills commenced from the Rhodesian ready position - that is gun held loosely at the belt level with the muzzle depressed to the offside.

Head shots were fired from the shoulder at 25 meters. Body shots were next at 50 meters, 75 meters, and 100 meters. Multiple targets were shot at 50 meters distance as well as up close at 7 meters. Close quarters targets were engaged both with snap shots from the shoulder, as well as from the Close Contact CQB position. Approximately 200 rounds were fired to get an overall impression of the lever action rifle in the anti-personnel role. Our findings were that there is very little that a realistic rifleman (acting as an individual - not a member of a military rifle squad) can expect from his weapon that the lever action cannot deliver.

If you are in need of an economic and effective rifle that offers as many advantages as a single rifleman can use within "defensive" or "urban" conflict distances, take a serious look at the lever action carbine. I think you'll like what you see. And if you want to learn how to fight with your "cowboy rifle" bring it to one of our Rifle Gunfighting courses.
Link Posted: 5/7/2004 10:41:01 AM EST
Ahh, crap. I've been trying to talk myself out of getting a Marlin Guide Gun in .45-70 for the last couple of months....this was NOT the thread I needed to see...

As far as perfect trunk guns go, a Marlin in .45-70 would be probably the perfect candidate....
Link Posted: 5/7/2004 3:09:22 PM EST
This is the Marlin I lust after, the 1895M
I talked myself down into a 336.
If I were going to get a big bore lever action, the 1895M is the one.

The story, as I understand it, is that modern rifles can handle .45-70 loads that exceed SAAMI specs. To get around it Marlin developed the .450 Marlin.
Link Posted: 5/9/2004 4:03:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/9/2004 4:07:41 PM EST by Evil_Ed]
Welp...I bit the bullet, so to speak. I picked up a Marling 1895G Guide Gun on Saturday.

Bought a box of commercial hunting loads for it ($24/20 rounds! Ouch! Time to get into reloading!) to put through it that afternoon..

Whoa. I've fired some toned-down 45-70 from GunnyG's Trapdoor Springfield...but this stuff! Wow! It kicked a fair bit. The barrel on my rifle is NOT ported (I understand that's an option?)...recoil wasn't unmanageable, however. I'm sure the rubber buttpad on it helped some

The trajectory on it...I need to find some ballistics tables, because when I finally figured out where to put the rear leaf to hit the monster rock that sits at about 200 yards at our range, I was some 6+- inches high at 50 yards! I'm really not sure that's right...

Looking at the damage it did to some logs I shot at, I wouldn't feel undergunned with one of those in my hands

A little light on ammo capacity, but definitily not undergunned...

It really could use a peep rear sight. That's about the only change I'd make to it.

Edited to add - like an M1 Carbine...it happens to fit PERFECTLY under the rear seat of my truck. Almost too perfectly, like the truck was designed that way...
Link Posted: 5/9/2004 5:16:29 PM EST
IIRC XS has ghost ring sights for it.
Also check out Wild West Guns they have a bunch of upgrades.
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 9:58:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/11/2004 9:59:59 PM EST by brewsky101]

Originally Posted By Stryfe:
This is the Marlin I lust after, the 1895M



That gun is officialy on the top of my "To Buy" list.
Top Top