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Posted: 6/16/2009 6:29:59 AM EST
I am reloading .44 magnum and all is going well except for one thing. Whenever I raise the ram to the top of the stroke, when I lower it, it takes a great amount of force for the case to “unstick” from the powder funnel. The powder funnel has brass lines on it and I have to use so much force as to hold the press down with my left hand and raise the lever up with my right or when it jars loose, it might even cause the top of the powder measure to come off and spray powder everywhere. I have soaked the funnel in acetone and sanded the funnel down with sand paper and it will work good for a minute but then the same thing starts happening. Ideas?
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 6:45:49 AM EST
Sounds like you're over-belling the case. Back the powder die out some.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:07:39 AM EST
A small amount of lubricant on the inside of the case mouth should help a great deal.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:17:38 AM EST
If backing off the belling a little doesn't help, give Dillon a call and ask them. Maybe there's a problem with the finish on your powder drop.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:20:12 AM EST
Take the funnel off and scrape the brass deposits off with a knife, then use a good copper remover to remove all brass.
Next time clean the dust out of the brass being reloaded to stop this.
'Borg
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:42:41 AM EST
If I were to guess, it would be that you are using new brass. This sticking is not uncommon with some brands of new brass. It helps greatly to wipe off the end of the powder funnel using steel wool or a scotchbrite pad, every 30-40 cases, to prevent enough brass buildup on the funnel to cause the drag. After it has been fired once, the high pressures smooth out the microscopic ridges, and leave a light coating of carbon, significantly lessening the friction.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 8:52:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By dillonhelp:
If I were to guess, it would be that you are using new brass. This sticking is not uncommon with some brands of new brass. It helps greatly to wipe off the end of the powder funnel using steel wool or a scotchbrite pad, every 30-40 cases, to prevent enough brass buildup on the funnel to cause the drag. After it has been fired once, the high pressures smooth out the microscopic ridges, and leave a light coating of carbon, significantly lessening the friction.


Yes, I'm using new starline brass. I will clean the funnel using a bore solvent to get the brass off the funnel and steel wool to get the brass off. I will also try some used brass and see if that helps.
Link Posted: 6/16/2009 9:42:06 AM EST
Don't adjust your funnel, it's not the problem. You need to remove the brass 'stripes' that ring your powder funnel because they are what is causing the problem. You see, they are buildup of brass from previous cases and are in effect increasing the diameter of your belling die. If not addressed, eventually they will cause your case neck to expand a bit reducing the neck tension necessary to hold the bullet in place. I polish them off of my powder belling die about once every 4,000-5,000 rds on my Dillon belling dies. It only takes a few minutes to polish off the brass residue.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 1:33:48 AM EST
Long time ago I had my 44 mag powder funnel turned down in a lathe by a gunsmith, solved my sticking problem. It was oversized.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 7:10:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By 50bmgAPI:
Yes, I'm using new starline brass. I will clean the funnel using a bore solvent to get the brass off the funnel and steel wool to get the brass off. I will also try some used brass and see if that helps.


It is especially important to lube new brass and freshly tumbled brass. Once you have finished cleaning the funnel try lubing the cases with Hornady One Shot. This is a lot cheaper and faster than performing potentially unnecessary modifications to the funnel. If lubrication doesn't help then look at modifications.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 7:13:28 AM EST
Originally Posted By 50bmgAPI:
Originally Posted By dillonhelp:
If I were to guess, it would be that you are using new brass. This sticking is not uncommon with some brands of new brass. It helps greatly to wipe off the end of the powder funnel using steel wool or a scotchbrite pad, every 30-40 cases, to prevent enough brass buildup on the funnel to cause the drag. After it has been fired once, the high pressures smooth out the microscopic ridges, and leave a light coating of carbon, significantly lessening the friction.


Yes, I'm using new starline brass. I will clean the funnel using a bore solvent to get the brass off the funnel and steel wool to get the brass off. I will also try some used brass and see if that helps.


I normally throw new .40 and .45 Starline brass in the tumbler with a little cleaner for a few minutes before loading. Helps prevent the sticking.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:00:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By eweloader:
Originally Posted By 50bmgAPI:
Originally Posted By dillonhelp:
If I were to guess, it would be that you are using new brass. This sticking is not uncommon with some brands of new brass. It helps greatly to wipe off the end of the powder funnel using steel wool or a scotchbrite pad, every 30-40 cases, to prevent enough brass buildup on the funnel to cause the drag. After it has been fired once, the high pressures smooth out the microscopic ridges, and leave a light coating of carbon, significantly lessening the friction.


Yes, I'm using new starline brass. I will clean the funnel using a bore solvent to get the brass off the funnel and steel wool to get the brass off. I will also try some used brass and see if that helps.


I normally throw new .40 and .45 Starline brass in the tumbler with a little cleaner for a few minutes before loading. Helps prevent the sticking.


Cleaning it for a few minutes is not likely to cause problems. Most of the trouble comes from new brass or brass that has been completely cleaned - that is it has spent several hour tumbling. According to Richard Lee, the the outer surface of used brass (not cleaned) acts as a lubricant.

The worst pistol calibers are the long ones. The .44 magnum, .45 Colt and .357 have caused the most problems for me. But even the .45 ACP and .45 Auto Rim can bind in the sizing die and in the powder charging die. This has happened to me with several different brands of dies. Since I began lubricating all the cases, the problem has vanished.

If tumbling for a few minutes helps for you, then keep doing it. BTW, what cleaner are you using?

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:11:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By MoonWolf:

If tumbling for a few minutes helps for you, then keep doing it. BTW, what cleaner are you using?



A modest amount of the Dillon. One bottle has lasted me over a year for all my brass cleaning.
New Starline seems very clean to begin with which promotes stiction. I would think a small amount of any lubricant would help.
Link Posted: 6/17/2009 8:17:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By eweloader:
A modest amount of the Dillon. One bottle has lasted me over a year for all my brass cleaning.
New Starline seems very clean to begin with which promotes stiction. I would think a small amount of any lubricant would help.


Thanks.

Link Posted: 6/17/2009 5:45:55 PM EST
I would still polish the funnel, making sure that it's nice and smooth.

Mine started to accumilate a light cost of rust, but it polished-out in about 3 minutes
with Simi-Chrome and a gun-cleaning patch.

It leaves behind a light lube, so it helps that way also.

Just make sure the inside is very clean, or the powder might not go thru
smoothly.

(Flitz, Knoristol or any polish will work in this job.)
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