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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 11/1/2006 7:40:19 AM EST
I've shot some surplus and some Wolf through it, both had problems. I read and found the dirty chamber explanation. So, I used a flashlight and was able to see a spot of gunk in the chamber. I used a cleaning rod, .30 cal bore brush, and 0000 steel wool to remove it. Chamber looked pretty clean. I took it out and shot it again Sunday and it's the same problem. I can start the bolt turning, but before the bolt handle goes straight up, it stops. I can use my hand and whack the handle and open it. I inspected the cases on Sunday and can't see any pressure signs. I did notice one thing that I found a little strange: at the transition bend from neck to taper, the bend was not even all the way around. The bend was higher (or closer to the case mouth) on one side than the other. Could this be indicative of a problem? Might adjusting the extractor as described in the other thread fix it?
Rifle is a Hex Tula 91/30 with a non-matching (electro-penciled) bolt.
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 8:27:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By JimTh:
I've shot some surplus and some Wolf through it, both had problems. I read and found the dirty chamber explanation. So, I used a flashlight and was able to see a spot of gunk in the chamber. I used a cleaning rod, .30 cal bore brush, and 0000 steel wool to remove it. Chamber looked pretty clean. I took it out and shot it again Sunday and it's the same problem. I can start the bolt turning, but before the bolt handle goes straight up, it stops. I can use my hand and whack the handle and open it. I inspected the cases on Sunday and can't see any pressure signs. I did notice one thing that I found a little strange: at the transition bend from neck to taper, the bend was not even all the way around. The bend was higher (or closer to the case mouth) on one side than the other. Could this be indicative of a problem? Might adjusting the extractor as described in the other thread fix it?
Rifle is a Hex Tula 91/30 with a non-matching (electro-penciled) bolt.


I'm not really sure what you mean. Could you explain this better?

If you look directly into the breech, you will notice that there is a semi-circle groove on the right side in which the extractor moves while the bolt is forward. Clean it out. Also, clean out the recesses in the receiver into which the locking lugs fit. The chamber is not the only place that needs to be de-nastified.

Now, the reason you feel resistance is because the extractor is binding on something. Wolf and many types of surplus seem to have thick case rims, and this is what I would guess is the problem. You can adjust the extractor to fit and function with whichever ammo you use, but be careful. If it is too long, you will have excessive headspace. If it is too short, you will not be able to close the bolt on a live round. If it is too loose, the extractor will drop the case before ejection. If it is too tight, you will expierience the problem you have now. The reason this happens only after you fire a round is because the case expands to fill the chamber and friction prevents it from turning in the chamber when you try to cock the bolt. To fix this, some people polish the chamber to eliminate friction. Some people manually recock the cocking piece before opening the bolt (this makes opening the bolt require less manual force on the bolt knob). I find it simpler to play with the extractor until it works the way it's supposed to. Be careful when you do this. Guns are dangerous.

I am not a gunsmith, and I don't claim to be an expert. I barely suvived WECSOG school myself. I have been handing out this explanation over the last few weeks, but I could be wrong. All I can guarantee is that it has worked well for me. Use your own good sense when modifying guns.
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 8:34:33 AM EST
Assume you have a dirty chamber. Clean and clean again. Stay away from Czech silvertip.
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 9:16:23 AM EST
Okay, visuallize an empty case standing up on a table, primer down. Start at the case mouth and move down to where the case flares out wider. This is the transition I'm referring to. If I rotate the case just right, that bend is higher on one side than the other. Seems to me that it might indicate an unevenly eroded throat?


Originally Posted By bradleyc:
I'm not really sure what you mean. Could you explain this better?
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 9:21:15 AM EST

Originally Posted By Will-Rogers:
Assume you have a dirty chamber. Clean and clean again. Stay away from Czech silvertip.


I disagree. I have zeroed and set up my M39 for Czech silvertip and use it exclusively in that rifle. 2'' groups at 100 yards are routine, and better groups are not uncommon. Since I got the rifle configured for that load reliablity has been 100%.

Mosins are very picky about ammo, and some hate Czech/Albanian/Wolf/whatever. The good news is that these rifles can be configured for nearly any load out there. Once I get a rifle zeroed and adjusted for a particular load, I asssign that load to the rifle and use it exclusively.
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 9:27:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By JimTh:
Okay, visuallize an empty case standing up on a table, primer down. Start at the case mouth and move down to where the case flares out wider. This is the transition I'm referring to. If I rotate the case just right, that bend is higher on one side than the other. Seems to me that it might indicate an unevenly eroded throat?


Originally Posted By bradleyc:
I'm not really sure what you mean. Could you explain this better?


That is strange, and the deofrmed case probably contributes to your sticking bolt. When you recock the bolt, the bolt head (and cartridge case) moves backwards a little bit. The deformation in the case might make it harder to do this.

I've never seen that before, but I would assume It's because of inconsistency in the cartridge case, not a defective rifle. I would have to examine it to be sure, but if it were me I would not worry about it very much. These steel cases are disposable and sometimes very old. so long as they come out of the rifle in one piece I'm happy.
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 9:45:11 AM EST
If it is not high pressure than it could be head space issue. Compare the fired case with unfired. Please post side by side pic.
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 2:48:44 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/1/2006 3:37:28 PM EST
Those are copper washed Wolf cases, right?

There may be some slight case deformation, but I would not worry about it. I might not have even noticed.
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