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Posted: 8/5/2003 1:13:10 AM EDT
Is it important to "replace" the carrier key of the bolt carrier when rebuilding it? Mine is still "factort installed" looks staked on at the screws, its not really damaged but the hole opening has some minor dings and imperfections.
Will replacing it add more risk of having gas leaks at this part as well as potential loosening of screw?
Link Posted: 8/5/2003 1:16:46 AM EDT
If the dents don't cause it to hit the gas tube, leave it alone. There is not a real seal there anyway, but I suppose in an extreme case it could cause short-stroking. Try it first and see.
Link Posted: 8/5/2003 5:12:21 PM EDT
The key on my Bushmaster worked loose. It apparently is not staked. I tightened it with an allen wrench but should i use some loctite on it?
Link Posted: 8/5/2003 5:16:25 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/5/2003 6:47:31 PM EDT
Even when they are staked they can work loose,my preban bushy is 11 years old 4 years ago it worked slightly loose so I got some gas loss,I cleaned the area under the key put some blue loc tite on the screw threads re tourqed the key and staked the screws tighter 6000 rounds later no problems,the loc tite didnt hurt and that is what bushmaster recomended at the time.
Link Posted: 8/6/2003 9:26:42 AM EDT
A propperly staked key CAN NOT work loose. It is a physical impossibility. The blue loctite was rendered inert the first time you shot the rifle a few rounds.
Link Posted: 8/6/2003 1:48:57 PM EDT
Just for the sake of seeing and because I have plenty of spare parts I filed down the metal where it was staked and needed a tourque wrench to turn the screws there was hard material white in color on the threads,I assume this was the loctite I applied,and when I applied it it sat for a week before I shot it,whatever happened heat didnt render the loctite inert and this was done 4 years ago.
Link Posted: 8/6/2003 2:08:41 PM EDT
When I was In Harly Davidson school,there was a Loctite rep. there and he said if you need to undo something with the loctite retaining compound (Green)or stud & bearing mount (Red) you need to heat to 300 deg F. to defeat it!Don't know about the Blue. I used loctite and staked mine when it came loose after only 90rds.So far doin fine. It was origionaly only staked twice so I staked it four places.
Link Posted: 8/6/2003 11:38:35 PM EDT
Properly replacing the gas key (and the two screws) certainly shouldn’t cause any problems. The only question is whether or not you need to. If there was any doubt in my mind and the parts and tools needed to replace them were readily available and inexpensive, I’d do it. Still, you can always do it later, too.
Link Posted: 8/6/2003 11:56:56 PM EDT
There was a white Loctite stud & bearing hi-temp for use on Dics Brakes - They often had those rotors dull read - temp didn't kill the white.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 12:44:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ProfGAB101: There was a white Loctite stud & bearing hi-temp for use on Dics Brakes - They often had those rotors dull read - temp didn't kill the white.
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What happens if you need to unscrew things??
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 9:23:09 AM EDT
I was refering to the Blue loctite. It has the lowest temperature to render it inert. Red requires some serious heating. Sounds like the white requires even more. Blue loctite will be useless after you dump one or two mags fast.
Link Posted: 8/7/2003 3:39:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 199:
Originally Posted By ProfGAB101: There was a white Loctite stud & bearing hi-temp for use on Dics Brakes - They often had those rotors dull read - temp didn't kill the white.
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What happens if you need to unscrew things??
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Breaker bar - it will come out - it just needs active persuasion. - The amount of torque is determined by the surface area of the threads to which it was applied.
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