Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/31/2006 12:54:53 PM EDT
is there a secret recipe for buffing satin stainless to a shine? buffing wheels? compounds? what's the scoop?

thanks in advance.

- septic tank



Link Posted: 1/31/2006 12:57:36 PM EDT
why would you do that???
just a question.
i'm thinking the reflection from the sun orother light might be a little distracting
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 1:59:12 PM EDT
wet sand with fine sand paper?
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 2:19:53 PM EDT
Wet sand with water and sand paper in ascending paper numbers, switching so that the sand grains are perpendicular each time you switch to a smoother paper.

Yes, it will take awhile.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 2:45:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By meateater:
why would you do that??? just a question.



A 2nd on this one. Why?
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 2:49:08 PM EDT
Because he wants to, thats the best answer he should give IMHO. I would think polishing compound would work, but it depends on if its been bead blasted or not etc..

Steve
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 2:56:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NUcadet07:
Because he wants to, thats the best answer he should give IMHO. I would think polishing compound would work, but it depends on if its been bead blasted or not etc..

Steve



Then I believe he got his answer. But, inquiring minds would still like to know why?
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 3:05:42 PM EDT
If you want to see a really nice shine, get some large polishing wheels and buff with different sized polishes. The wheel takes less time, and depending on the existing finish will depend on where you want to start, and if using any sandpaper will be needed. Make sure you are doing this wet, as it tends to leave a nicer finish.

I've seen some stainless barrels that took on a nearly mirror finish, other don't. Be careful around the muzzle end.

Maybe he just wants a shiney barrel. Same reason as why someone would want a high gloss finish on a nice walnut stock, it looks nice. Not everyone has to have a "combat grade" finish on their toys.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 3:11:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By UVvis: toys.

Not a knock, but gives insight to the application.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 3:16:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pcurtis:

Originally Posted By UVvis: toys.

Not a knock, but gives insight to the application.



Glad to see you picked up on my point. Regards...
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 4:37:24 PM EDT
Best results will be had if you use an 8-10" buffer, running at about 1800 rpm.
Depending on the original condition of the barrel, you may be able to start at 240 grit (140 is the lowest) and work up from there. The next grits up are 320, 400, 500. Then you can start using polishes like 555 black, 555 gray, and 555 white if you want the utmost in shine.

A set-up like the above with a 3/4 hp Baldor buffer will easily run in excess of $500.

I realize that this info probably won't be of much help to you, but it is how the professionals do it.

I've polished some guns and barrels up to 555 gray and man do they shine.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 4:50:26 PM EDT
thanks for responses. i want to do it because it will set the units off... they'll have more of a custom appearance. the barrelled actions are brand new. i'm planning on polishing the barrel and not the acition. i'll then use model paint and a tooth pick to fill in the letters with paint that matches the stocks i'm building.

by the time i true everything up, work over the triggers and bolt, they'll likely shoot 1/2 to 1/4 MOA with great loads. they won't compete with the benchrest crowd, but they'll put the hurts on a prairie dog...

i want something that isn't the same old thing....

i have three grinders, two of which are variable speed. i think i'll go with the pads and start on the underside of the barrel near the action. if i don't like the way it starts to look i can stop and it'll be covered in the stock...

any more suggestions are welcome.

thanks to all.

septic tank

Link Posted: 1/31/2006 4:54:57 PM EDT
they'll look more customized and individualized when i'm done. i've worked over these howa 1500 actions and built these kinds of rifles up many times, but never "gone the extra mile" to achieve a different look. i'm looking forward to the results. i can post a pic or two when done.

thanks,

septic tank

Link Posted: 1/31/2006 5:04:46 PM EDT
It would be wise to practice on something that has no value. A piece of an old barrel or some round stock would work.

Be fore-warned, the 140 and 240 grits will remove manufacturer stampings and lettering in a hurry if you stay in one spot too long, they will round over flat edges and will wash out screw holes.

The 140 and 240 grits can be pretty aggressive in their cutting action.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 7:08:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thezman:
It would be wise to practice on something that has no value. A piece of an old barrel or some round stock would work.

Be fore-warned, the 140 and 240 grits will remove manufacturer stampings and lettering in a hurry if you stay in one spot too long, they will round over flat edges and will wash out screw holes.

The 140 and 240 grits can be pretty aggressive in their cutting action.



thezman,

this is great. howa is good about putting a 12" long warning on the top of the barrel that looks like shit... i suppose i can snag a piece of metal and give it a test run.

thanks for the help.

surely i can't take away enough material in one spot to be an issue under barrel heat conditions can i? you know what i mean... the effects of barrel heat on a uniform vs. non-uniform barrel concentricity.

hmmm...

thanks,

septic tank
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 8:26:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By septic-tank13:

surely i can't take away enough material in one spot to be an issue under barrel heat conditions can i? you know what i mean... the effects of barrel heat on a uniform vs. non-uniform barrel concentricity.



When you polish deep to remove pits or blemishes in the barrel, the metal is being removed in that area, it's gone. The surrounding area will be a different dimension.
I would doubt that it would have much affect on the barrels "consistancy", but anything is possible.

If you decide to polish out the lettering, you are going to have to do some blending of the area around where you polished. If you don't, the barrel may not look right when you polish it up nice and shiny, the light and reflection will be off. Kinda looking into one of those distorted mirrors at the Fun House.

But remember, the more you blend, the more metal you remove, the less concentric your barrel is going to be.

The only real way to remove lettering or deep pits, and maintain true consistancy, is to recontour on a lathe.

Link Posted: 2/1/2006 8:00:15 PM EDT
After doing all the mechanical polishing that you can practically do, there is an additional process called "Electropolishing" that will make the stainless look like a mirror finish, almost like ornamental chrome plate.

One warning though. Stainless steel is relatively soft, not like chrome plate. It will scratch.

Check with some local stainless steel fab. and machine shops and they can point you to an electropolisher in your area. Be sure to discuss the part with the vendor and specify its size and weight and any areas that need to be plugged off or masked, like the inside of your barrel.

Better yet, use a small scrap piece of your barrel material, same AISI material number, and run a test first.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 6:15:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2006 6:18:05 AM EDT by septic-tank13]

Originally Posted By thezman:

Originally Posted By septic-tank13:

surely i can't take away enough material in one spot to be an issue under barrel heat conditions can i? you know what i mean... the effects of barrel heat on a uniform vs. non-uniform barrel concentricity.



When you polish deep to remove pits or blemishes in the barrel, the metal is being removed in that area, it's gone. The surrounding area will be a different dimension.
I would doubt that it would have much affect on the barrels "consistancy", but anything is possible.

If you decide to polish out the lettering, you are going to have to do some blending of the area around where you polished. If you don't, the barrel may not look right when you polish it up nice and shiny, the light and reflection will be off. Kinda looking into one of those distorted mirrors at the Fun House.

But remember, the more you blend, the more metal you remove, the less concentric your barrel is going to be.

The only real way to remove lettering or deep pits, and maintain true consistancy, is to recontour on a lathe.




suspecting even small barrel concentricity issues could ill affect accuracy, maybe i'll let the lettering go if it is etched deeply into the barrel... as i remember on the last ones i did, the warning across the top of the barrel was barely scratched into the barrel, but...

the whole reason i'm choosing this route is a blend of cost and results. i know there are much better set ups out there. most all cost more. after i've finished with lapping, truing, trigger/sear work, and some bedding and stock build ups, i've never had a unit that didn't shoot .5 MOA yet. this two i'm working up now will make 11... not hundreds or thousands like the big dogs, but still a fair amount of fun and success - plus the local tight asses will actually buy these and talk up my meager part time shop/hobby.

i don't want to make something "shiny" if i'm risking it's accuracy. maybe i should perform all the work on both and break them in, then after recording their performance, i'll polish one completely and the other partially and retest. this won't be absolute, but it may shed some light on how much is too much...

i think this is what i'll do.

thanks for the help all!

oh, and if someone has more suggestions, i'd be glad to hear them.

thanks,

septic tank

Link Posted: 2/2/2006 1:12:00 PM EDT
I have taken several Stainless steel barrels to a high Chrome like polish. All of them were Pistol and revolver barrels though.....

But the easiest fool proof method is to buy yourself a big tube of "Flitz" metal polish !!

Rent a couple of War movies you like.........set down in front of the TV and VCR with Flitz, Rag and barrel in hand .....and go at it.

The more you rub............the brighter the finish. I have actually taken one barrel to the point it looks like chrome plated. Going it by hand is slow....but you maintain control over how much brightness you add to the barrel. The higher the polish --- the more finger prints will show.

Using a buffing wheel...can "burn" the metal if you are not careful.....these stains are very hard to remove.

Try Flitzing.............you will be amazed.

JF.
Top Top