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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 4/5/2006 12:10:47 PM EDT
Why are varmint rifles all top of the line with free-floats/stainless HBARS/bipods/etc...

Do they serve a specific purpose for hunting small game to where they wouldn't be practical for general practice?
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 12:18:03 PM EDT
Because varmint rifles need extreme accuracy. When your shooting a target that is about 3" wide at sometimes 300 yards or more, you need all the help you can get from barrels, handgaurds, and triggers.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 12:19:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By viking57:
Because varmint rifles need extreme accuracy. When your shooting a target that is about 3" wide at sometimes 300 yards or more, you need all the help you can get from barrels, handgaurds, and triggers.



To expand on what viking57 said...varmints (prarie dogs, usually) are very small and shot at very long ranges, usually off of rests. This can explain the heavy barrels, stocks, high power scopes, etc that you see on most guns. Heavier is better, more accurate is better.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 12:23:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By viking57:
Because varmint rifles need extreme accuracy. When your shooting a target that is about 3" wide at sometimes 300 yards or more, you need all the help you can get from barrels, handgaurds, and triggers.



To expand on what viking57 said...varmints (prarie dogs, usually) are very small and shot at very long ranges, usually off of rests. This can explain the heavy barrels, stocks, high power scopes, etc that you see on most guns. Heavier is better, more accurate is better.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:38:09 AM EDT
Is there an echo in here?
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 3:54:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/6/2006 3:54:38 PM EDT by SDPDHunter22-250]
And most important of all.... the heavier gun doesn't come off target and with a good quality scope, you can see the impact of your shots, making it easier to compensate if you miss on the first. You also get to see the target explode if your gun stays on target instead of recoiling away. I shoot a DPMS superbull 24" and it doesn't move off target.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 5:29:12 PM EDT
Ive found out that you want as much weight past the bipod legs as possible on the dog town to keep the thing from swaying. A 20" barrel is much more diffucult to shoot when the wind is blowing on your back compaired to a 24 or 26" long barrel.
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