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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/30/2005 5:00:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2005 5:01:35 PM EDT by xarget]
from what little i can find on them they both seem to be nice, but which do you most prefer? the troy looks to me like it is backwards, the zero marks are on the front side and seems to me would be a pain in the ass if you wanted to make sure it was zeroed, the arms on the other hand looks to be a little more user friendly, i have never used or seen either 1 in person just pics on the net, but can't decide between the 2 wich 1 i want, any help u guys got would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 5:16:07 PM EDT
The benefit to the Troy is that once you zero it, it won't move until you change it yourself. It's an A1-style sight. Also, with the lines on the front, you can see the aperture position with the sight folded back.

I prefer the Troy because my BUIS is an after thought. I practice with it from time to time, but it's only there for when my Aimpoint fails. And if that's the case, I don't want an A2 style like the 40L that will shift when I don't want it to.


YMMV.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 5:41:55 PM EDT
personally i would go with the troy

but both are great buis'
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 5:44:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 6:04:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Chuckles5492:
The benefit to the Troy is that once you zero it, it won't move until you change it yourself. It's an A1-style sight. Also, with the lines on the front, you can see the aperture position with the sight folded back.

I prefer the Troy because my BUIS is an after thought. I practice with it from time to time, but it's only there for when my Aimpoint fails. And if that's the case, I don't want an A2 style like the 40L that will shift when I don't want it to.


YMMV.



You have it wrong about the 40L. An A2 type sights are two connected apertures that form an L or semi L, and ride and turn on the same windage screw. The aperture holes are not centered to each other, one is off set to compensate for rotation of traveling on the screw. The A2 sights also compensate for bullet drop, via the small aperture being above center of the large aperture. The 40L is a split A2 or SP aperture design that does not travel at all when selecting an aperture. The apertures only move via the windage knob, and neither one rotates om the screw, can't move windage wise when selecting an aperture, because they are locked in.
A2 apertures by definition are not same plain, two different things. The A2 apertures were selected by the USMC for Marine corp. riflemen for their M16A2 rifles, and they are not someone you want to shoot against at any distances.
Link Posted: 8/30/2005 8:11:15 PM EDT
ok, dont say anymore, im gonna order a troy before i change my mind again, thanks guys
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 3:36:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By xarget:
ok, dont say anymore, im gonna order a troy before i change my mind again, thanks guys





great choice
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 10:31:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By xarget:
ok, dont say anymore, im gonna order a troy before i change my mind again, thanks guys

I lost $50 when switching from a 1 week old ARMS 40L to a Troy.

Months later I don't have a single regret.
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