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Posted: 9/16/2004 11:36:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2004 11:36:59 AM EST by ASNixon]
Would a single point sling make a decent patrol sling? What are the pros and cons of using one this way? I know most use them as a CQB sling, but would it be a problem to use one with web gear?

Link Posted: 9/16/2004 12:02:06 PM EST
The work fine with web gear. The problem with a single point in that mission is that since it is only attached at one place the weapon is able to swing around more. Also, most tac slings will also allow you to sling the weapon over a shoulder like a regular sling which is not option with a single point.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 2:50:37 PM EST
Thanks Hoplophile. Makes sense.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 8:56:50 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 1:27:49 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/18/2004 2:43:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/18/2004 2:45:45 PM EST by warriorsociologist]

Originally Posted By TREETOP:
I use a single point sling regardless of where I am or what I'm doing. I've found that it encourages me to keep at least one hand on the carbine, which helps keep me in a ready position at all times.



Good post. IMHO, one should always (but especially when "patroling") keep 2 points of contact/control on his/her rifle (meaning the sling = (1) and your hand(s) = (1-2 more)...yes, this was beaten into me in the 'Corps). I like single point slings for the same reason as was said above...especially for a carbine. The only time I'd opt for another is for say a road march...but then again, I don't take to many of those anymore. Also, other slings work much better for long distance rifles - for obvious reasons.

- my .02
Link Posted: 9/18/2004 5:21:23 PM EST
Thanks much folks. I ordered both the MOUT and SOP slings to see which one I liked better. These will go on two different carbines - with two different set-ups. My original issue was more concerns over binding with web gear - harness (TT MAV) + pack (TT Assault Pack). Can you speak more to this issue and your experience?
Link Posted: 9/18/2004 5:30:08 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/18/2004 6:08:21 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 1:30:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By TREETOP:

We don't all get company cars, and there are plenty of places the cruiser won't go.







Very true Treetop. When my daughter broke her leg 3 months ago in the North Western mountains of NC while riding a dirt bike, it took 4 4-wheelers and a 4-wheel drive ambulance to get her out. The ambulance had to wait half a mile away from her accident. I haven't heard of the cop per square mile program - yet, not in the mountians. So you see why I ask. Living in a VERY small town in the nw mountinas of NC means you are mostly on your own.

Link Posted: 9/19/2004 5:45:33 PM EST
I have always used a VERY simple 550 Cord sling on my M16A2 when I was still foot patrolling.

Basically I made a slip loop that fit around the reciever end of the handguards, and attached the other end to the Sling Swivel on the buttstock.

If you are a right handed shooter, you put your right arm and head through the sling. When the rifle hangs, it does so cross-body muzzle down with the stock almost in your shoulder. It only takes a minimum of coordination to keep it there. You can adjust the lenght for patrolling with a ruck or with just deuce gear.

Since it was only 550 Cord it didn't rattle, it was CHEAP, and you could drop the rifle and transition to pistol, or swing the rifle out of the way for more mundane tasks.

I wish I had a rifle to rig it up on and get a pic, but alas I have been without a black rifle since I left the corps in 2000. I am hoping to resolve that in the next week or so. (was waiting for the dreaded ban to expire)
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 5:53:44 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 5:58:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By LoneWolfUSMC:
I have always used a VERY simple 550 Cord sling on my M16A2 when I was still foot patrolling.


Welcome to the boards.

5 or 10 years ago we were all using the plain issue slings and rigging them up with 550 cord, rubber bands, ordnance tape, or what have you. Today we can get the 'real' slings from places like CQB Solutions and The Wilderness and they are much better. And at $25-$30 they are probably the cheapest 'tactical' accessory you can buy.
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 6:08:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hoplophile:

Originally Posted By LoneWolfUSMC:
I have always used a VERY simple 550 Cord sling on my M16A2 when I was still foot patrolling.


Welcome to the boards.

5 or 10 years ago we were all using the plain issue slings and rigging them up with 550 cord, rubber bands, ordnance tape, or what have you. Today we can get the 'real' slings from places like CQB Solutions and The Wilderness and they are much better. And at $25-$30 they are probably the cheapest 'tactical' accessory you can buy.



I second both of Hoplophile's comments. Good to see another Jar-head on board.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 4:16:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2004 4:18:21 AM EST by ASNixon]
Welcome LoneWolfUSMC. This board is probably the best source on the planet for anything black rifle. Plenty of opinions here, mostly from very experienced folks - that even includes Lumpy.

Thanks for the reminder Lumpy, I had forgotten USMC FR used single points. I believe I saw a Gunny in FR talking the praises of a single point. I think I will most likely employ the MOUT from CQB (now Specter) and put an extra DD Burnside loop on my other rifle. I like that I can have the attachment point on each rifle and just use one sling.


Edited for: Crappy spelning
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 4:43:18 AM EST
My past problems with single point slings is that during transitions to a handgun the single point sling can allow the barrel to touch your leg. This can lead to an ouwie if you just dumped two mags through the carbine.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 7:31:15 AM EST
Funny how there's nothing new under the sun.
Civil War Cavalrymen used single point slings.
The sling was a broad leather strap loop worn diagonally over the left shoulder. There was a steel snap fastener on a roller hanging from the strap that snap fastened to a steel ring on the left side of the carbine. The roller would travel up the sling when the carbine was shouldered so the sling didn't have to
slide over the body , slowing it down. A modern plastic copy might be quicker than dragging a sling across the back where you may have a pack or water bottle etc.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 7:39:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
My past problems with single point slings is that during transitions to a handgun the single point sling can allow the barrel to touch your leg. This can lead to an ouwie if you just dumped two mags through the carbine.



:) Having that exact thing happen to me more than just once was enough to make me consider the merits of a dissy set-up for the first time.... Though, I still own mostly M4gry-types.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:04:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
My past problems with single point slings is that during transitions to a handgun the single point sling can allow the barrel to touch your leg. This can lead to an ouwie if you just dumped two mags through the carbine.



or it pivots straight down and hits you in the junk!
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:17:08 AM EST

Originally Posted By GackMan:

or it pivots straight down and hits you in the junk!



which, of course, is ESPECIALLY BAD when it's hot.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 8:59:12 AM EST
yeah - searing hot pain in the groin will for sure slow you down, if not take you out of the fight for a while.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:26:12 PM EST

Originally Posted By Hoplophile:
Welcome to the boards.



Thanks. I am waiting to hear back on a final price on a new Rock River CAR A4 w/quad rail. That is probably what I am going for especially with the warranty they offer.

Since this rifle will see some hard duty that is a nice plus.

For many years the M16 was WAY TOO much a central part of my life. It feels kind of funny to go so long without one. It's just too bad that I can't afford a REAL A2 or M4. Too bad even if I could, there would be no place for it in my current line of work (LEO).

I have already learned a bunch from this site just lurking and reading the FAQ's. I never had to worry about where I was getting a rifle before, or what to put on it. Usually the armorer just hands your your rifle, you zero it and go.
Link Posted: 9/21/2004 12:05:39 PM EST
I prefer a single point sling for all of my shoulder weapons, with the exception of precision rifles.
Link Posted: 9/24/2004 10:54:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By GackMan:

Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
My past problems with single point slings is that during transitions to a handgun the single point sling can allow the barrel to touch your leg. This can lead to an ouwie if you just dumped two mags through the carbine.



or it pivots straight down and hits you in the junk!



Ouch, work through the pain or try this:

You should control the lowering of the carbine to a position with the ejection port towards you with the weak hand and let it hang. At the same time get a firing grip on your pistol with the strong hand. Complete the transition to the pistol and solve the problem. This was Pat Roger's method taught at the 223 Carbine class at Gunsite and it works well. Just practice with unloaded weapons until your smooth.

I know about the VG in the nuts.
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