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Posted: 8/16/2007 3:45:05 AM EDT
Being a newby I was just wondering about comments I have read about carbon deposits. Is this really a big problem or just negative comments in order to push the piston style? Does carbon actually built up to the point that it has to be scraped off? If you clean your rifle after each shoot the carbon is minimal and easy to remove? What say you?
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 4:05:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2007 4:06:35 AM EDT by LoneWolfUSMC]
It all depends on how many rounds you fire at a time.

If you only go out and shoot 20 rounds, there isn't going to be much carbon on the back of the bolt. If you run several hundred rounds in a session, then there will be a hard carbon deposit on the back of the bolt.

Some say that you do not need to scrape this off, but I always have. It definitly dosent hurt to do so, and I was always taught to clean a M16 to spotless condition.

This is really the only spot that carbon "bakes on". Scrape it off and run a chamber brush in the carrier and you have taken care of it.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 4:09:00 AM EDT
Thank you for the good advice. What type of brush... would you recommend to scrape the carbon off?
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 4:22:55 AM EDT
a Bronze brush and some oil will work just fine.

I used steel wire wheel on a bench grinder with no ill effects. Wear gloves.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 4:34:59 AM EDT
It's not that big of a deal, but more of a minor pain in the ass. It's easier if you soak the disassembled BCG in brake cleaner or CLP while you are cleaning the chamber and bore. Then you can easily scrape off the buildup with a dental pick.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 6:04:04 AM EDT
My second Platoon Sergeant always claimed that his M16 ran better with the correct amount of carbon build-up.

Whatever floats yer boat, man....
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 6:15:22 AM EDT
Does anyone have any TIPS or a great tool for scraping off the carbon? I mean other than a dental pick which I don't have. Maybe someone has thought of a clever way to scrape off the crap?

:)
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 6:52:35 AM EDT
Fired 5.56 casing.

Soak the bolt in CLP.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:44:40 AM EDT
Use the end of the brass insert from a stripper clip.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:48:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By clasky:
It's easier if you soak the disassembled BCG in brake cleaner or CLP while you are cleaning the chamber and bore. Then you can easily scrape off the buildup with a dental pick.


+1

I use homemade Ed's Red. My formulation is 1/3 ATF fluid, 1/3 mineral spirits, and 1/3 Kroil. If I don't have that, I use straight ATF fluid.

I put the bolt in a small glass jar, and soak the bolt overnight. Next day, I use an old toothbrush to remove the carbon. Usually, it just falls off overnight. I use spray carburetor cleaner to remove that. I use 0W-20 Mobile One for lubrication.

I have found this method to be very effective.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:53:13 AM EDT
I never fire Wolf so that may be an exception. But firing US made ammo I have never had any carbon issues. Basically if carbon builds up too much on your bolt it will get knocked off by rounds cycling, it's not that tough of stuff.

I use CPL and like to see my parts clean. I take it down, spray some CLP down the barrel and juice up the bolt parts, then clean the lower, then the barrel and chamber, then the bolt and reassemble. I have never had any issues with hard to get off carbon, even those times where I didn't clean better outings.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:36:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By AtlantaFireman:

Originally Posted By clasky:
It's easier if you soak the disassembled BCG in brake cleaner or CLP while you are cleaning the chamber and bore. Then you can easily scrape off the buildup with a dental pick.


+1

I use homemade Ed's Red. My formulation is 1/3 ATF fluid, 1/3 mineral spirits, and 1/3 Kroil. If I don't have that, I use straight ATF fluid.

I put the bolt in a small glass jar, and soak the bolt overnight. Next day, I use an old toothbrush to remove the carbon. Usually, it just falls off overnight.


Yup, I use Ed's Red as well. The stuff works great on getting that baked on carbon off of the bolt and other BCG parts.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:56:45 AM EDT
In the past I have recommended soaking the bolt and related parts in a mixture of Hoppes #9 and mineral spirits. This works good for softening carbon, but can smell if not used with proper ventilation.



I’ve since switched to soaking parts in CLP while I attend to cleaning other parts of the rifle. A bronze bore brush most times is all that’s needed to remove softened carbon after a good 15-20 minute soak in CLP.





As far as scrapers go, I have my own homemade aluminum scraper that I use for
inside the bolt carrier and sometimes on the bolts tail.

Link Posted: 8/16/2007 10:17:09 AM EDT
height=8
Originally Posted By TheMocoMan:
Does anyone have any TIPS or a great tool for scraping off the carbon? I mean other than a dental pick which I don't have. Maybe someone has thought of a clever way to scrape off the crap?

:)


I found this site for getting dental tools

site

I have a couple (I didn't get off this site) and they have made cleaning both AKs and ARs easier. I figure for this price, it's not too bad of a get.
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