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Posted: 3/13/2005 7:27:56 PM EDT
How far are they accurate to?

Anyone have experience with these ?

Trying to figure out how they ZERO THEM IN..
Especially since it seems like at different distances the strike of the round would be higher and lower ...

THANKS
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 5:35:52 AM EDT
[#1]
The problem is the laser is not affected by gravity (like the bullet)and it will go farther than you can see with NV.I zeroed mine at 100 yards. I am not comfortable shooting past 200 yards with NV.(especially with black cows everywhere)
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:36:41 AM EDT
[#2]

Quoted:
How far are they accurate to?

Anyone have experience with these ?

Trying to figure out how they ZERO THEM IN..
Especially since it seems like at different distances the strike of the round would be higher and lower ...

THANKS



They are as accurate as far as you can see, and as far as your weapon maintains accuracy.

They are zeroed exactly like every other laser, optical scope, reflex sight, or iron sights.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:40:02 AM EDT
[#3]

Quoted:

They are as accurate as far as you can see, and as far as your weapon maintains accuracy.

They are zeroed exactly like every other laser, optical scope, reflex sight, or iron sights.



That's weird, I always thought that lasers computed the barrel length of the rifle they are attached to, figured out what type of ammo was being used, then compensated for wind and trajectory loss to maintain zero no matter what.
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:54:02 AM EDT
[#4]
A laser is just like any other light, it goes perfectly straight unless it hits something to make it defract.  There is no way to make laser light "curve" upon emmission to mimic the trajectory of a bullet.

-Randy
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 8:57:48 AM EDT
[#5]

Quoted:
A laser is just like any other light, it goes perfectly straight unless it hits something to make it defract.  There is no way to make laser light "curve" upon emmission to mimic the trajectory of a bullet.

-Randy



Apparently you don't undestand something called "SARCASM"  
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 10:10:44 AM EDT
[#6]
Light does get bent by gravity!  
Link Posted: 3/14/2005 11:23:07 AM EDT
[#7]
There is a special target for this, depending on the weapons system. The established military way, from what I have gleaned, is to zero it at either 10 meters or 25, depending on the system it is mounted on. On M16/M4 systems, it is done at 25 with the actual laser hitting 2cm low and left from POA, though that depends on where you mount the laser. Wherever you mount it, the laser will be striking 2 cm up or down, and 2 cm from POA, because the laser is vertically and horizontally off line with the axis of the bore. If you Google it and follow all of the links, you will eventually find the military's exact intructions and examples of the targets they use, and from there you can fabricate your own.

I just zero mine at about 25 yards by making the aiming and illuminator dots coincide with the 3 MOA dot on the EOTech. For CQB ranges, the offset is less than an inch, and mine will shoot increasingly further to the left and up past about 50 yards, though not more than a couple of inches. Doing this takes less than a minute, and the PEQ has held zero to within a 1/4" the last couple times I have taken it off (and it won't fit in the locking rack with a PEQ mounted).

By our policies and case law, I would almost never be right shooting at someone when I was wearing NVGs much further than that, as I would have a hard time justifying use of deadly force and articulating how someone is a threat at those ranges at night, when I am using NVGs and they aren't. Now if we were covering the drop zone for an Al Qaeda cell parachuting into the US to set off WMDs or something equally unlikely, then all bets are off, but this is mostly a good feature for us for inner perimeter and rural area searches, and as such, expected and lawful engagment ranges will rarely exceed about 50 yards, which would probably be the same for you if you are out plinking coyotes or javelina's.
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 12:27:12 PM EDT
[#8]

Quoted:
Light does get bent by gravity!  



You beat me to it Einstein
Link Posted: 3/15/2005 1:16:57 PM EDT
[#9]

Quoted:

Quoted:
Light does get bent by gravity!  



You beat me to it Einstein



Alright Mr. Wizard and Mr. Wizard Jr., for purposes of this thread we can assume that the practical effect of gravity of photons is in no way comparable to the effect gravity has on rifle-fired 5.56mm projectiles... sorry I forgot that disclaimer in my original answer.  
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