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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/8/2004 8:27:06 AM EST
I'm trying to decide on if I should get a Hi or low profile top. Which one works better with scopes so you can get a good spot weld?
Not interested in flip up sights at all, just scopes
Thanks
Borg
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 8:29:26 AM EST
You mean cheek weld?
I've got a flat top, I had to put risers on it to use Burris Hi Zee rings. I'd rather have a hi-rise upper.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 8:29:41 AM EST
It all depends on you. What do you mean "spot weld"? Do you mean "cheek weld"? What kind of optic? If you are undecided on this but want versatility I would go flat top, that way if you want a carry handle you can just put one on.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 8:45:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/8/2004 8:46:30 AM EST by We-rBorg]
Just read my 1st post, I meant FLAT top, sorry, missed the flat.
Excuse, "spot weld" refers to "cheek weld" term used be the competition people, sorry.
I have 7 uppers and all are A2's of different forms. I want a flat top that I can put a scope on and leave, but I didn't know which to go with to be able to see through the scope without having to adjust my head position. I want to be able to throw it up and have it on a natural sight plane.
Borg
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 9:00:16 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 9:03:15 AM EST

Originally Posted By BookHound:
Personally, I'd get a regular flat top. No "high rise" uppers for me, thank you. You are limiting your options IMHO with the high risers. I can add a riser to my flat top IF I need one.



or higher rings
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 9:26:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By BookHound:
Personally, I'd get a regular flat top. No "high rise" uppers for me, thank you. You are limiting your options IMHO with the high risers. I can add a riser to my flat top IF I need one.


I want to limit my options, this is going to be a dedicated upper only, never to be changed once I get it where I want it, after all I have a lot of uppers that I can change. I have everything else, I just need to have a hunting upper.
Borg
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 10:20:36 AM EST
Still, you want a flat top; then get rings instead of a quick-detach system for your scope.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 11:58:11 AM EST
Use a normal spec flat top not some abomination high rise out of spec upper. You can get higher rings for the regualr flat top.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 12:01:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By BookHound:
Personally, I'd get a regular flat top. No "high rise" uppers for me, thank you. You are limiting your options IMHO with the high risers. I can add a riser to my flat top IF I need one.



I agree... high rise may save you having to buy a riser for a certain configuration, but you are limited to THAT configuration for the duration of that upper's usage.


- BG
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 12:10:36 PM EST
NEVER buy the hi-rise uppers. They suck!

You are very limited on the scope mounting. If you need to mount a specific scope a bit forward, having a hi-rise upper will only allow you to move the rings as far forward as the end of the upper. While having a standard upper it will allow you a few different methods to extend the scope rings forward.

This might sound a bit confusing but just trust me, do not get the hi rise upper.


I know from personal experience. I spent big bucks on a custom AR15 and having the hi rise upper added to the kool looking factor. But when I went to mount a scope I had bought I couldn't move it far enough forward to allow proper eye relief. I had to buy a different scope which while doing the job is not the one I had wanted to use.


Let me just add that it is probably cheaper to buy the hi rise upper as it might save a few bucks when it comes to buying a scope mount. But in the future if you decide to change the setup you might have issues.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 12:20:15 PM EST
Try DPMS High Ride uppers they offer standard length and extended scope rail dedicated scoped uppers ,they're designed for propper cheek weld by just changing scope ring heigth.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 12:26:47 PM EST
Go with the regular height flat-top. With the high-rise you might be able to mount the scope with regular rings--or you might not be able to mount it at all. There's a very good chance you won't be able to get it far enough forward. With a regular flat-top you have the option of using an extended riser rail or a mount with an offset like the Armalite to get the extra eye relief. I have a Weaver V16 in an Armalite mount and it's as far forward as it goes. I have a 2-7x in tall rings that has touched my eyebrow a couple times. The extra little bit of the other mount would be nice.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 7:34:35 PM EST
All I want to do is mount a standard scope with standard rings, nothing more. All I need to know is which flat top do I need to have the proper height and eye relief for a standered ring/scope setup so I don't have a problem looking through it without raising or ilowering my head. I do not need a quick detach scope, just a PERMANANT scope/ring combo. I do not want to buy high rings, I have standard rings now. I don't care if it limits me because I'm not going to change it, once I get it set up.
Is this impossible? Or am I asking the wrong question?
Borg
Link Posted: 10/11/2004 6:32:17 AM EST
I believe the high-rise flattops are designed to do exactly what you want to do. HOWEVER, depending on the eye-relief of your scope you may not be able to get the scope far enough forward, in which case you're stuck with having to use a different scope, or switch to a regular flat-top with extended riser or offset mount to get the extra room. We're just suggesting that you go with the latter method to begin with, rather than take the chance on the former not working.

I don't know what the prices on the high-rises are, but I think you can get cheap riser block for about $20. I think they're usually 1/4" high. Based on my crude measurements with a ruler, the Armalite mount puts 3/4" between the top of the flat-top and the bottom of the scope tube (1" scope). That appears to put the center of the tube about 1/8" lower than the irons. The rings I replaced only had about 1/2" between the rail and scope and that was too low to see through the scope unless you squished your cheek down hard into the stock. 5/8" between is workable for low-power scopes with large exit pupils.
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