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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/16/2005 11:28:12 AM EDT
I recently just bought my first AR. In the owners manual it tells how to perform a function check. Of course this is done with an emtpy chamber. It says to set the gun on safe and attempt to fire. The hammer should not fall. Then says to turn to fire and pull the trigger. The hammer should fall. In my experience with a variety of other guns, it is generally frowned upon to dry fire a firearm. Whats the deal with an AR?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 11:30:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Weasel_Master:
I recently just bought my first AR. In the owners manual it tells how to perform a function check. Of course this is done with an emtpy chamber. It says to set the gun on safe and attempt to fire. The hammer should not fall. Then says to turn to fire and pull the trigger. The hammer should fall. In my experience with a variety of other guns, it is generally frowned upon to dry fire a firearm. Whats the deal with an AR?



Dry Firing is overrated, won't affect your AR. If you are worried just buy some snap caps.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 11:32:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2005 11:33:01 AM EDT by _DR]

Originally Posted By Weasel_Master:
I recently just bought my first AR. In the owners manual it tells how to perform a function check. Of course this is done with an emtpy chamber. It says to set the gun on safe and attempt to fire. The hammer should not fall. Then says to turn to fire and pull the trigger. The hammer should fall. In my experience with a variety of other guns, it is generally frowned upon to dry fire a firearm. Whats the deal with an AR?



There is no problem dry firing as long as the rifle is fully assembled.
The military routinely uses dry firing with a dime balanced on the barrel as a training aid, and of course it is part of the function check.
It does not harm the weapon.

On the other hand, do not release a cocked hammer if the upper is off of the lower. The hammer striking the aluminum wall of the receiver will not help anything.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 11:37:17 AM EDT
During basic at Parris Island we dry fired extensively during the initial portion of marksmanship training.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 11:40:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Weasel_Master:
.. In my experience with a variety of other guns, it is generally frowned upon to dry fire a firearm. Whats the deal with an AR?



No offense - but the only guns I've found that couldn't be dry fired were .22 rimfires (for obvious reasons) and old relics who's firing pins were too brittle. Any decent quality modern firearm should be able to be dryfired with no problems. It's a HIGHLY recommended method of inexpensive training.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:23:42 PM EDT
There is no problem dry firing as long as the rifle is fully assembled.
The military routinely uses dry firing with a dime balanced on the barrel as a training aid, and of course it is part of the function check.
It does not harm the weapon.

So will it hurt the gun to dry fire a complete lower ?
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:25:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 4npower:
There is no problem dry firing as long as the rifle is fully assembled.
The military routinely uses dry firing with a dime balanced on the barrel as a training aid, and of course it is part of the function check.
It does not harm the weapon.

So will it hurt the gun to dry fire a complete lower ?




ABSOLUTELY IT WILL HURT IT. Do Not dry fire a lower only.

The hammer slams into the back of the magwell at full force. Something will break
eventually. You can get some hard rubber and stick in there to absorb the impact
and I think someone makes a gadget to do basically the same.
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 3:47:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 3:48:32 PM EDT by _DR]
If you want to see how hard the hammer hits the magwell when you dry fire a complete lower only, put the pinkie of your non-firing hand between the hammer and the magwell, pull the trigger.

Bet you only do it once
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:01:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 11:02:36 PM EDT by slider713]
I do know it is bad for some rifles. I know that on my M1 Carbine, it can break a firing pin easy
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 11:09:50 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2005 11:10:28 PM EDT by Wombat_SCSO]

Originally Posted By Forest:
No offense - but the only guns I've found that couldn't be dry fired were .22 rimfires (for obvious reasons) and old relics who's firing pins were too brittle. Any decent quality modern firearm should be able to be dryfired with no problems. It's a HIGHLY recommended method of inexpensive training.



big +1

This goes for pistols as well as rifles:
Dry fire to your trigger finger's content. Practice presentation, sight picture, sight alignment, breathing, trigger press and follow through dry firing. Practice reloads and clearing malfucntions with dry fire and snap cap/dummy rounds. You can do this at home and save money on ammo and range fees. Work on muscle memory and get proficient, so when you are spending money (or your ass is on the line) you make it count.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 11:33:39 PM EDT
Fulton Armory makes a dry fire device for this purpose. It's a Delrin cylinder that goes into the bolt carrier and stops the hammer just after it's released. This allows you to reset the hammer with just a ~1/4 inch pull on the charging handle. It's about $17 but well worth it. You'd be surprised at how effective dry fire practice can be.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 11:41:43 PM EDT
Dry firing without the bolt/carrier in place causes damage to the bolt catch and its slot in the lower. Notice how the bolt catch doesn't move freely when the hammer is resting on it?

For dry firing, I use a CMP/NRA approved OBI (open bolt indicator). It does the same purpose and absolutely assures there is nothing in the chamber.
Link Posted: 8/18/2005 11:53:43 PM EDT
If you're REALLY worried about it:



I ended up with free one, and its decent I guess

Fulton Armory webpage
Link Posted: 8/19/2005 10:17:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2005 10:17:30 AM EDT by _DR]
Well haven't they just thought of everything. I wonder if there is any other firearm on the planet that has as many custom parts, accessories and toys made for it.

ETA Besides the 1911 of course
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