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Posted: 8/8/2004 8:08:37 PM EST
According the the myth filled "The Book of the AR-15" magazine that has been recently released... They state that after some 2000 or so rounds that buffer springs begin to get weak and can cause short-stokes...

are any of you frequent carbine shooters out there getting any of these problems? I'm getting a buffer spring soon and i don't know whether to go chrome-silicon (added insurance), or just an LMT mil-spec buffer spring...

i don't see how even if you buffer spring does loose some of its strength... wouldn't it just slow your cycleing and make recoil a little more... rather than causing short-stokes.... Short stokes should be caused from an over power buffer spring, extrememly heavy buffer or not enough gas (right?)...



Link Posted: 8/8/2004 9:07:37 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/8/2004 11:32:07 PM EST
Would full-length rifle springs have a longer life expectancy than carbine-length springs?
Link Posted: 8/9/2004 12:38:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By Cato556:
Would full-length rifle springs have a longer life expectancy than carbine-length springs?



It shouldn't. Springs wear out through compression and decompression, so i wouldn't think length would prolong the life of the spring.
Link Posted: 8/9/2004 2:06:44 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/9/2004 6:03:27 AM EST
I keep a few spare rifle and car springs on hand, at $2 each, why not?

If you are going to shoot AR-15's, just lay in a supply of springs, pins, small parts. They are cheap, and better to have them on hand than have to order them. It is stupid to pay $6 or $6 shipping for one $2 part. Go on and get some stuff, oil them and store away.
Link Posted: 8/13/2004 12:20:38 AM EST
Yeah they wear out at around 2,500 or even if your using the gun the springs adventualy wear out, I would just go with the standard springs, yeah the chrome silicone one's are nice, but hey, look at it this way, $3 for a spring versus $64 for a sping, you decide
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 9:17:44 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/17/2004 1:16:23 PM EST
Originaly from MrSmokealot


Yeah they wear out at around 2,500


Based on what date to support that statement?
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 8:41:16 PM EST
buy a high quality buffer spring (LMT) and you'll never worry about it...
Link Posted: 9/19/2004 9:19:33 PM EST
you can use the old one on that damn screen door.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 1:12:13 PM EST
zediker.com Info on chrome silicon springs, from David Tubb $24.95 + shipping.
Link Posted: 9/20/2004 3:33:34 PM EST

Do Buffer Springs "WEAR" out?!


I have a registered M16 rifle and never had any problems with it until this weekend at a large get-together. Twice (out of hundreds of rounds) we had problems with it. After QuietShootr inspected it, the general consensus was that my buffer spring was too weak. BTW, I'm still using the factory A1 stock and buffer assembly, although the upper is a 14.5" M4.
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 3:37:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By wanabe:
zediker.com Info on chrome silicon springs, from David Tubb $24.95 + shipping.



i've heard from people who have tryed these springs they have had troubles with functioning...
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 4:17:11 AM EST
We had this discussion at TMO, the owners of older AR, think it was 15yrs & 17yrs, they said they never had to replaced their buffer spring.

I've got extra buffer springs,never had to changed one yet,but Im the type who always has parts on hand.

TG



Link Posted: 9/22/2004 4:36:45 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/22/2004 9:15:18 PM EST
I've got about 5000-6000 rounds on my old buffer spring and have never had a problem.
Link Posted: 9/23/2004 5:57:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/23/2004 5:57:43 AM EST by Forest]

Originally Posted By MrSmokealot:
Yeah they wear out at around 2,500 ...



If that were true then they would be allowed to 'fail' and be replaced during the 6000 round acceptance test described in the Mil-Spec for the M16A2 rifle and M4 carbine.

If the part was only expected to last 2500 rounds then it would require 2 changes for each of the 4 carbines during the test (total of 8 part changes). The spec only allows for 3 unservicable 'general' parts during the test (and those 'other parts' that are allowed failure are listed on page 12 and are limited to the fire control parts). If a buffer spring fails on ANY of the rifles or carbines then the acceptance test would fail - and the rifles would be rejected.

It's all covered in Mil-C-70599A on page 11.

Minimum
expected life should be 6,000 rounds.
Link Posted: 9/23/2004 7:50:23 AM EST
Back when I was grunt in the USMC, my M16A1 was fed at least 8000 rounds, between blanks fired during MILES-equipped war-games, rifle re-qualification, and other "live fire exercises" of various kinds; I never experienced any short-stroking or other failures that could be attributed to the buffer spring.

I had one rifle assigned to me during those years, so I got to know it pretty well.

I know that springs can and do wear out. I just don't think its something to worry overmuch about. Keep a spare in your range box, along with an extra extractor and other assorted goodies and you'll be set.

Link Posted: 9/23/2004 9:42:40 AM EST

Originally Posted By PaulE:
The Tubb springs (ISMI) are stiffer than standard springs. Designed to keep the bolt locked slightly longer to improve accuracy. Keep in mind however that the intended use is on competition rifles that are heavily weighted and are shooting tpically heavier bullets with max-load powder charges (or close to it anyway). Just dropping one into a standard AR config may or may not work. The carbine spring under an H-buffer will commonly cause short stroking. Changing to a standard carbine buffer will often function okay though.

The Tubb springs are high quality and have their purpose, but they are not a cure all.



I don't believe that's the way they're marketed. Their CWS is, but the spring is marketed more as a lifetime replacement part for a stock spring. They maintain stock springs will weaken and shorten over time to the point that malfunctions occur. They further maintain their chrome silicon springs won't lose compression or shorten over time. They also maintain that chrome silicon has certain properties which make them superior: can operate in high heat without degrading, and that they can use a lighter spring weight yet still provide full force when compressed. Not sure I'm convinced that their product is superior to others, but if it truly is a lifetime replacement, it would offer peace of mind. In the grand scheme of things, $25.00 isn't going to break the bank.
Link Posted: 9/23/2004 12:43:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By jmart:

Originally Posted By PaulE:
The Tubb springs (ISMI) are stiffer than standard springs. Designed to keep the bolt locked slightly longer to improve accuracy. Keep in mind however that the intended use is on competition rifles that are heavily weighted and are shooting tpically heavier bullets with max-load powder charges (or close to it anyway). Just dropping one into a standard AR config may or may not work. The carbine spring under an H-buffer will commonly cause short stroking. Changing to a standard carbine buffer will often function okay though.

The Tubb springs are high quality and have their purpose, but they are not a cure all.



I don't believe that's the way they're marketed. Their CWS is, but the spring is marketed more as a lifetime replacement part for a stock spring. They maintain stock springs will weaken and shorten over time to the point that malfunctions occur. They further maintain their chrome silicon springs won't lose compression or shorten over time. They also maintain that chrome silicon has certain properties which make them superior: can operate in high heat without degrading, and that they can use a lighter spring weight yet still provide full force when compressed. Not sure I'm convinced that their product is superior to others, but if it truly is a lifetime replacement, it would offer peace of mind. In the grand scheme of things, $25.00 isn't going to break the bank.



Wolff offers a spring for only $15. It is extra power, but if the Tubb spring actually is stiffer, then the effect is the same and for less money.
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