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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/22/2005 7:44:26 PM EDT
Maybe this belongs in the General forum, but I was reading in my old IET TRADOC "Smart Book" and under the M16 maintenance section it says after re-assembly to "Pull the trigger to release the pressure on the firing pin spring." I have always been taught and told that dry firing is bad. Then it got me thinking - most of my long guns in the cabinet are "cocked". Is this really bad for the firing pin spring? Should I use a snap cap for every gun to dry-fire, or does it really matter? Thanks for remarks anyone can give. hug.gif
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:50:29 PM EDT
Not on an AR just 1911s and other poorly designed firearms.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 7:56:00 PM EDT
Two things:

1. Dry firing is not a problem at all and it is a very important part of training.

2. There is no firing pin spring and if there were a firing pin spring then having the hammer resting on the firing pin would be putting it under tension and potentially causing it to be weakened. They suggest dropping the hammer (aka dry firing) to ease tension on the -hammer- spring.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:29:38 PM EDT
Dry firing is recomended by a lot of instructors and can teach you adequate trigger control.

Never dry fire any rimfire guns....for obvious reasons.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:36:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hoplophile:
Two things:

1. Dry firing is not a problem at all and it is a very important part of training.

2. There is no firing pin spring and if there were a firing pin spring then having the hammer resting on the firing pin would be putting it under tension and potentially causing it to be weakened. They suggest dropping the hammer (aka dry firing) to ease tension on the -hammer- spring.



+1
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 4:14:07 PM EDT
is leaving the hammer cocked bad for the spring, i read here before about magizine springs and engineers said springs wear from cycling not from being held within there limit for extended time. i still leave most of my mags unloaded, it just seems to me like they would loose service life either way. cycling or being held under tension?
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 4:25:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By offroader333:
is leaving the hammer cocked bad for the spring, i read here before about magizine springs and engineers said springs wear from cycling not from being held within there limit for extended time. i still leave most of my mags unloaded, it just seems to me like they would loose service life either way. cycling or being held under tension?



I keep most of my magazines unloaded and all of my SHTF ammo on stripper clips...

When my weapons are "off duty" I keep the tension off of all springs...

Its just my way of doing things and I have no actual proof that it will increase the life of any spring...
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 4:53:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 5:24:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By theshootersden:

Originally Posted By offroader333:
is leaving the hammer cocked bad for the spring, i read here before about magizine springs and engineers said springs wear from cycling not from being held within there limit for extended time. i still leave most of my mags unloaded, it just seems to me like they would loose service life either way. cycling or being held under tension?



I keep most of my magazines unloaded and all of my SHTF ammo on stripper clips...

When my weapons are "off duty" I keep the tension off of all springs...

Its just my way of doing things and I have no actual proof that it will increase the life of any spring...



springs dont weaken if loaded, they only weaken if loaded/unloaded many times. My dad had some llama .380 mags loaded for 30 years went out shot about 50 rds, and they functioned fine.
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 7:03:28 PM EDT
Dry fire the hell outta that AR...good practice. As far as bolt guns go, depress the trigger as you close the bolt. This will release the pressure on the firing pin spring without the violence of dry firing...this works for rimfires too.
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 8:56:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rizzo1318:
Maybe this belongs in the General forum, but I was reading in my old IET TRADOC "Smart Book" and under the M16 maintenance section it says after re-assembly to "Pull the trigger to release the pressure on the firing pin spring." I have always been taught and told that dry firing is bad. Then it got me thinking - most of my long guns in the cabinet are "cocked". Is this really bad for the firing pin spring? Should I use a snap cap for every gun to dry-fire, or does it really matter? Thanks for remarks anyone can give. hug.gif



Why are your bolt guns stored cocked? You do know you can decock most every bolt gun in existence by hoding the trigger while closing the bolt.
Link Posted: 9/24/2005 10:43:21 PM EDT
Is there an echo in here?
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 6:06:45 PM EDT
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