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Posted: 4/26/2009 10:46:23 AM EDT
I've heard some people mention this as a cleaning method (boiling the part in water).  Seems like it might have some merit to it.

I was thinking about detail stripping and cleaning some pistols this way.  What's the general consensus on this method?  I wouldn't boil anything made of wood or plastic, but what about all metal parts?
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 11:09:22 AM EDT
I've done it.

Water in a large enough pot, set it on the stove and turn up the heat, added a few squirts of dishwashing liquid, when it started boiling I put the whole revolver in (minus the grips) and let it boil till the crud stopped coming out.

Poured the water off enough to get to it, dropped it on a folded over towel and started taking it apart.  It was dry before I could get it apart.  Looked it over good, sprayed it with oil (if I was doing it today I'd do it with RemOil), wiped the parts off and began to put it back together.

No issues and it was clean and worked great afterwards.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 11:27:22 AM EDT
The boiling water (pulled or sucked up the barrel by a cleaning rod & soft cleaning end) trick is what a good many of us with older rifles and corrosive ammunition use to dissolve the corrosive salts.  

I don't know how well it would clean up the greases and lubes in modern actions though.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 12:10:04 PM EDT
unless corrosive primed ammo used is a waste of time current lubes will not melt at 212F and why temp fate as to rust, stain etc.
better to soak in mineral spirts (piant thinner) bush and soak will get out all the crud with NO rust worry.
bruce
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 12:19:15 PM EDT
WHY????? With what's available for cleaners would you even consider it???
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 12:19:49 PM EDT
I believe the operators' manual advises against it.



Apparently CLP builds up a layer of Teflon after repeated use... "seasoning" the metal. They say the water cleaning will dissolve the Teflon, so your rifle never gets the proper seasoning.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 12:24:58 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 12:36:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By QUIB:
Originally Posted By tbougie1:
WHY????? With what's available for cleaners would you even consider it???




Just curious is all.  Maybe I'd learn something new?  If I didn't think outside the box and reassess every once in a while I'd never learn anything of value.  Always be curious - always be a student and never assume that just because you haven't done it that it's not worth doing.

It might be an easier way to do it that wouldn't expose me to chemicals.

Anyway, thanks gents.  I won't be ditching the hoppes 9 then.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 12:47:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2009 12:47:56 PM EDT by QUIB]
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 1:22:18 PM EDT
Originally Posted By QUIB:
There’s only one weapon I own, that ever sees a drop of water, and that is my 98k Mauser. And even then, water is only used because of the corrosive surplus ammo I use.

So, cleaning with water is nothing new to me, and I’m not assuming anything.

On modern weapons firing non-corrosive ammo, I see no reason to use water. To me, the chances of rust and corrosion are too high. Weapons that are carried and fired in wet weather, deserve special treatment afterwards. Why subject your weapons to moisture each and every time you clean them?


I wasn't saying anything bad about you.  I was just explaining why I was asking since the other gentlemen that you quoted was wondering why I was thinking about it.  It's just that I don't know anything about cleaning that way.  I wasn't calling you into question, just explaining my own thoughts and my reason for asking.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 1:44:15 PM EDT
I've done it to remove cosmoline from small parts.  

I've stuck a couple Mosin actions in the dishwasher with just hot water only to remove the f**king cosmonline.

I only do this as a last resort or I need to save a little time.  The parts have to be oiled right away or rust will take over quickly.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 4:29:27 PM EDT
Never thought about Boiling I could consider it on my almost 20 y/o Stainless S&W .40 cal but I would do the Mineral Spirits first. I've done it before and it worked great.
Link Posted: 4/26/2009 7:14:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2009 7:16:07 PM EDT by Swatter911]
When I was in the academy, I used to put my S&W 686 in the dishwasher (minus the grips of course).  Stuck the whole damn thing with the cylinder open in the top rack.  Saved me a crap load of time that I could put to use writing memos and polishing boots.  Did have to re-oil it though.




I wouldn't seriously recommend it to anyone today.

ETA: I was living at home with my mom and dad at the time.  My mom freaked the first time she opened it and saw that gun in there next to her glasses.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 9:21:18 PM EDT




Originally Posted By Swatter911:

When I was in the academy, I used to put my S&W 686 in the dishwasher (minus the grips of course). Stuck the whole damn thing with the cylinder open in the top rack. Saved me a crap load of time that I could put to use writing memos and polishing boots. Did have to re-oil it though.










I wouldn't seriously recommend it to anyone today.



ETA: I was living at home with my mom and dad at the time. My mom freaked the first time she opened it and saw that gun in there next to her glasses.
I have done some wooden stocks gunked up with cosmoline in the dishwasher (gets some of the lighter dings out too).  For some reason women seem to react poorly to this.




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