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Posted: 5/11/2004 5:30:31 PM EST
I must start out by saying that I love my 50 Beowulf. I wanted to make a statement about my findings though. I have heard several say that no harm what-so-ever would occur to the lower while firing the big 50. I have fired 2 1/2 boxes of shells (about 50) thru it, and upon examining the buffer, I found that the steel of the bolt carrier is etching (for lack of better description) a ring in the face of the recoil buffer. There is a slight indention all the way around the buffer where the bolt carrier touches the face of it. I am going to keep working it out and see if it progresses.

In retrospect, I would still purchase the rifle, as I really enjoy shooting it. I would be hesitant to use only an upper on a lower that I switch back and forth to another weapon. I figured on punishing this one, and will leave it with the 50. And if it means occasionally switching the buffer, I can handle that. This isn't a rifle I will be putting 300rds a day thru.

Anyone else have this occur? Anyone else mind looking at the face of the buffer and seeing if it is? Any suggested solution?

Thanks
Doc
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 5:33:21 PM EST
I dont own a 50 Beowulf however I know that this problem does NOT occur with the 458 SOCOM round...just some FYI for those big bores out there.

~CoLd

Link Posted: 5/11/2004 8:09:11 PM EST
The test lower that we use to test fire every single upper has some unsavory number of .458 SOCOM rounds through it. The buffer has started to show signs of wear similar to what you describe, but this does not detract from functionality, it appears to be limited in depth and no problem

Marty
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 8:15:05 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 9:38:59 PM EST
gee, i was just getting ready to start a thread asking if the .50 beat up lowers. so other than superficial damage to a cheap, easily replaceable part, what does everyone think of it?
Link Posted: 5/11/2004 10:26:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 5/11/2004 10:27:15 PM EST by AZ-K9]


Happens on 5.56 lowers too.


Not a big deal. Maybe you could try a pillow in between them.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 2:57:29 AM EST
What AZ said.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 3:06:06 AM EST
Yup. My .223s do the same thing.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 4:15:35 AM EST
mine too.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 6:23:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By AZ-K9:
img26.photobucket.com/albums/v77/jsinz/DSC02211.jpg

Happens on 5.56 lowers too.


Not a big deal. Maybe you could try a pillow in between them.



Happens on 5.56 uppers, AR10's, 300 Whisper Uppers supersonic and subsonic ---

Not a big deal. Brownells sells an adhesive backed poly-somethingoranother cover that will go over the buffer and protect it if it bothers you.

Link Posted: 5/12/2004 8:49:01 AM EST
pillow didn't fit. maxi-pad worked great!!
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 9:17:10 AM EST
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 12:39:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By druncuncas:
pillow didn't fit. maxi-pad worked great!!



with wings?
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 1:52:06 PM EST
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 8:35:29 PM EST

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:
This is onne reason I don't use a buffer detent in any of my rifles. Part of that wear is the "jump" the bolt carrier makes before it contacts the buffer. Not using the buffer detent also provides constant positive forward pressure on the bolt carrier for smoother more reliable cycling. Drop the hammer on an empty chamber to capture the buffer as you pull the lower and upper apart.



Is that "jump" the dull rattle you hear if you shake the rifle back and forth (other than the firing pin bouncing off the retaining pin)? I would think that the locking lugs would keep the bolt/carrier in check.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 8:57:41 PM EST
On a related note, I hear a scary "sproing" from my buffer tube, and my brass deflector has icky yellow marks on it.

Seriously, Doc, don't worry about the marks. If your buffer retainer detent was getting bent up, now that would be a problem.
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 9:08:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By SinistralRifleman:
This is onne reason I don't use a buffer detent in any of my rifles. Part of that wear is the "jump" the bolt carrier makes before it contacts the buffer. Not using the buffer detent also provides constant positive forward pressure on the bolt carrier for smoother more reliable cycling. Drop the hammer on an empty chamber to capture the buffer as you pull the lower and upper apart.



If the upper/lower are in spec, shouldn't the bolt carrier slightly push the buffer back when you close them? If there is a gap, then the buffer will hit the buffer detent every shot - it should not do this right?
Link Posted: 5/12/2004 9:55:08 PM EST
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