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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 10/21/2013 12:13:29 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2013 12:14:50 PM EST by Mrs_Esterhouse]
I'm having trouble deciding between Trijicon Accupoint 30mm bolt-on scope rings or opting for a GG&G Accucam QD base w/ 30mm integral rings.

The GG&G integral mount/rings weighs 5.5 oz -- $145

The Trijicon ring set weighs approx 4.5 oz -- $103

I have no use for a cantilevered mount since it's going on a monolithic rail with no rail seam.

So, is QD worth an extra ounce of weight plus an extra $42?

Are there any drawbacks with QD mounts over bolt-on such as being less secure?
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 12:24:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/21/2013 12:27:02 PM EST by ScottyPotty]
How often do you remove your optics? Personally I think it's just the latest trend.

That said - I buy QD cuz I'm a follower.....
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 12:35:36 PM EST
Once installed, I usually don't remove optics unless they break or I upgrade to something newer.
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 12:59:39 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Mrs_Esterhouse:
Once installed, I usually don't remove optics unless they break or I upgrade to something newer.
View Quote


Looks like you answered your question. If you changed optics regularly, such as a night vision scope for night hunting, then I'd say yes.
If not, then you've basically got a mount that's more expensive and more prone to snagging and unintentional release.
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 1:13:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Nostradumbass:


Looks like you answered your question. If you changed optics regularly, such as a night vision scope for night hunting, then I'd say yes.
If not, then you've basically got a mount that's more expensive and more prone to snagging and unintentional release.
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Originally Posted By Nostradumbass:
Originally Posted By Mrs_Esterhouse:
Once installed, I usually don't remove optics unless they break or I upgrade to something newer.


Looks like you answered your question. If you changed optics regularly, such as a night vision scope for night hunting, then I'd say yes.
If not, then you've basically got a mount that's more expensive and more prone to snagging and unintentional release.

In a scenario like your typical zombie apocalypse, how likely is it a scope would fail? I can't imagine any scenario where one might need QD other than where the optic shits the bed in Afghanistan during a firefight.
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 3:00:52 PM EST
The other cool thing about qd mounts is if you like to run a red dot but then want to do some long range shooting you can just switch them out.
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 4:19:06 PM EST
I think they're worth it, but my primary AR is an MRP. I can pop off the H1, pop on a magnified optic and another barrel. My other AR has an ACOG, I like the QD option there just because if it did fail, I'd have to pull it (not that the ACOG would fail, unless it takes a bullet).

For a RDS, it wouldn't matter as you can shoot through it. Also, the stock Aimpoint mount (military issue or the one on the PRO) comes off easy and returns pretty close to zero. For good quality optics it isn't an issue. Ironically, the cheaper the optic, the more I would want QD to get it off in case of failure. The cheaper the optic, the less likely I'd be to spend big $ on a high quality QD mount!
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 4:59:23 PM EST
Yes, I believe they are worth it. I like to be able to go from my T1 to my 1x6x or to my 5-20x. My mounts of choice are ADM.
Link Posted: 10/21/2013 8:24:45 PM EST
::shrug::

You know what they say about common sense being common...

If you frequently remove and replace your optics for whatever reason (multiple optics per upper, frequent cleaning, case fitment, ect.) then they're worth it.

If you don't... then they're not.

I typically don't use QD mounts unless they come with the optic (whether in packaged mount form or integral) in the first place. I do use them for magnifiers, however.

The only other argument, I suppose, is rapid removal for use of BUIS.

Given the fact that I rarely use BUIS, it's kind of a moot point to me.

~Augee
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 8:04:42 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ScottyPotty:
The other cool thing about qd mounts is if you like to run a red dot but then want to do some long range shooting you can just switch them out.
View Quote


Succinctly and well stated. +1.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 10:59:36 AM EST
You guys do know that you can remove and swap optics with a non QD mount too right? You just need an inch/lb. torque wrench which you should have anyway.

I buy my mounts based on what criteria I need in the mount. Specifically desired height for the right cheekweld and if I need any cant in the mount.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 11:17:35 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ScottyPotty:
How often do you remove your optics? Personally I think it's just the latest trend.

That said - I buy QD cuz I'm a follower.....
View Quote


Constantly. I have a ton of different rifles, and a ton of different optics, and even I constantly remove my optics.

Frankly, the only optics I even keep semi permanently mounted on my rifles are red dots - my red dots still all have QD mounts though.

I remove any and all of my magnified optics before my rifles go back into the safe. All my LaRue mounts hold zero after removal, and rifles without big magnified optics on them leave for more room in the safe.

I like to swap some magnified optics between a few rifles, and also like having the ability to quickly remove an optic if I were to need to switch over to BUIS, or for any other reason.

Frankly, I see no reason not to go with a QD mount - there's nothing but benefits going that route.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 12:51:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/22/2013 12:56:13 PM EST by MS556]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
I like to swap some magnified optics between a few rifles, . . ..
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I was completely with you until I saw this part of the post. How do you do that without having to re-zero each time?

The scope has to be zeroed to the base on the particular rifle. On a different rifle that zero will not be the same. Bases or rails are not parallel to the bore, sometimes have built in elevation compensation of varying degree for long range use, and machining of rails and of non-railed mounts and receiver tapped holes are not uniform from one rifle to another. I wish they were, but they are not. At least not mine, not even on very high end weapons.

Even when swapping different optics on the same rifle (which you can do with very accurate return to zero with good QD mounts), you have to use the exact same T-slots every time to avoid injecting error from variations in the machining of that individual rail from slot to slot.. Or at least that's my experience.

I love lever QD mounts and use them extensively. Mostly either LaRue or ADM on rails, and the very elegant, strong and accurate Talley lever QD's on bolt guns.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 1:41:20 PM EST
The re-zeroing required when I swap magnified optics between rifles is easy and negligible.

I solely swap optics between my ARs, and always mount them in the exact same T-slot regardless of which weapon they're on.

And while I understand slight machining variations between one upper receiver to the next, my zeros are rarely that off when I swap my optics around.

I keep most of my magnified optics zeroed at 100 yards, and always check my 100 yard zero first when I swap them around. I rarely have to make more than a few clicks of adjustments at the very most to be dead on.

Far from a big deal.
Link Posted: 10/22/2013 1:49:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By MS556:


I was completely with you until I saw this part of the post. How do you do that without having to re-zero each time?

The scope has to be zeroed to the base on the particular rifle. On a different rifle that zero will not be the same. Bases or rails are not parallel to the bore, sometimes have built in elevation compensation of varying degree for long range use, and machining of rails and of non-railed mounts and receiver tapped holes are not uniform from one rifle to another. I wish they were, but they are not. At least not mine, not even on very high end weapons.

Even when swapping different optics on the same rifle (which you can do with very accurate return to zero with good QD mounts), you have to use the exact same T-slots every time to avoid injecting error from variations in the machining of that individual rail from slot to slot.. Or at least that's my experience.

I love lever QD mounts and use them extensively. Mostly either LaRue or ADM on rails, and the very elegant, strong and accurate Talley lever QD's on bolt guns.
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Originally Posted By MS556:
I like to swap some magnified optics between a few rifles, . . ..


I was completely with you until I saw this part of the post. How do you do that without having to re-zero each time?

The scope has to be zeroed to the base on the particular rifle. On a different rifle that zero will not be the same. Bases or rails are not parallel to the bore, sometimes have built in elevation compensation of varying degree for long range use, and machining of rails and of non-railed mounts and receiver tapped holes are not uniform from one rifle to another. I wish they were, but they are not. At least not mine, not even on very high end weapons.

Even when swapping different optics on the same rifle (which you can do with very accurate return to zero with good QD mounts), you have to use the exact same T-slots every time to avoid injecting error from variations in the machining of that individual rail from slot to slot.. Or at least that's my experience.

I love lever QD mounts and use them extensively. Mostly either LaRue or ADM on rails, and the very elegant, strong and accurate Talley lever QD's on bolt guns.


I switch my Nikon P-223 3-9X40, in a Larue back and forth between my two AR's when working up loads for them. I zeroed it to one ar, and than kept record of how many clicks to zero for the other ar.

Been doing this for a couple years now, and the only time I had to adjust with more clicks one way or the other was because I didn't pay close attention to mounting the Larue exactly the same way as before.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 12:15:43 AM EST
I personally love QD.

On something like a Remington 700--sure, I'll use "hard" mounts. But for an AR platform? QD all the way, and that goes for other accessories for that matter.

I saved my ass off for an ACOG, and can only afford (and justify) one. So I have to make it quick and easy to move to another upper if I want to.


On this note, do some reading on Bobro mounts. I personally find them outstanding.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 12:26:25 AM EST
i am a scope swapper, too, and also find that it usually takes only a couple of clicks to be on target. QD rules. I wouldn't have a non-QD mount. Helps things fit in the safe. too.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 6:37:56 PM EST
Let's take scope swapping out of the equation. Has anyone ever had an optic fail where it necessitated the need to change to BUIS at that very moment? For that matter, has anyone ever had an optic completely fail? I'm not talking batteries here.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 7:52:56 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mrs_Esterhouse:
Let's take scope swapping out of the equation. Has anyone ever had an optic fail where it necessitated the need to change to BUIS at that very moment? For that matter, has anyone ever had an optic completely fail? I'm not talking batteries here.
View Quote


Yes, Chinese reflex junk. Yes, Bushnell TRS-25 that would not hold zero on a tactical shotgun with heavy slugs. Yes, a Leupold and a good American made "real" Redfield on hunting rifles. Both scopes were damaged in accidents, a horse stumbled and fell on one in a scabbard. The other fell some 30 feet and hit scope first on rocks. Scopes were later repaired free under warranty but were out of action in the field. Backup iron sights or pre-sighted QD mounted optics saved the day in every case. If you have not had an optic experience mechanical failure in the field you haven't lived long enough. I'm 63 years old and have been shooting and hunting since I was a teen.

While I can count the instances as rare, they can and eventually happen, even to the best equipment you damage yourself.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 8:00:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mrs_Esterhouse:
Let's take scope swapping out of the equation. Has anyone ever had an optic fail where it necessitated the need to change to BUIS at that very moment? For that matter, has anyone ever had an optic completely fail? I'm not talking batteries here.
View Quote

Yes I have broken some optics, usually cheaper ones.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 8:04:44 PM EST
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Originally Posted By ankratz:
I personally love QD.

On something like a Remington 700--sure, I'll use "hard" mounts.
View Quote


Why? Do you think a bolt rifle cannot have strong, solid, dependable return to zero QD mounts?

I've been using Talley QD lever rings and bases on a lot of bolt guns, including magnums for decades. I even use them on a scout scoped .45-70 "Magnum" single shot that pushes 405 grain bullets at close to 2100 fps. That is elephant gun territory. That scout scope, when removed allows use of a Williams receiver sight.
Link Posted: 10/24/2013 8:21:29 PM EST
Buying the right, quality QD mounts can only enhance your ability to swap if needed in a sitcky situation.
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 10:45:52 AM EST
had a Redfield scope go black on me this weekend sighting it in on my lever action. Dont know if it had been dropped in past or what, but took my last shot after adjusting it from previous group and clang, clang. Lens inside was rolling around in the tube. Had to find allen wrench to take it off and then zero irons. Perfect reason for QD!
Link Posted: 10/25/2013 11:18:42 AM EST
My LT mounts hold zero so well, I usually remove optics for a good cleaning of them and the rifle. I've removed them countless times, both magnified and aimpoints and just put them right back on and go.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 1:52:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 1:53:32 AM EST by Chisum]

I use LR QD mounts because I want the option of using iron sights. I've never lost zero, never. If you are going to mount a scope and don't want options then it's no big deal.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 3:15:59 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 4:56:53 AM EST
I bought a qd mount off thr EE, but I probably won't get another. It is an American Defense mount. I won't get another because I don't need one. A mount that bolts on is fine for me. If I found a qd mount for a really good price I would probably get it though. As for the quality of the AD mount, no complaints, very pleased.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:43:04 AM EST
I tend to get QD mounts for ARs (but not for precision bolt gun). The QDs are mainly for hunting. If I drop the rifle and damage a scope, I can remove it quickly without tools and use the back-up sights, so the hunt can go on. My bolt gun does not have irons, so the hunt would be over anyway if the scope failed. I do like the option to easily move optics from rifle to rifle.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:27:44 PM EST
45 deg RTS completely slipped my mind. If these are installed in place of normal BUIS, I really can't see any reason to go QD for any optic.

Link Posted: 10/28/2013 10:17:20 AM EST
Anyone have experience with an RTS setup? Good? Bad?
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 11:05:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/28/2013 11:07:00 AM EST by Whhood]
I've never tried them. I'm sure they do their job, but I prefer a little more streamlined rifle.

ETA: referring to above ^ not QD.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 11:16:17 AM EST
I like switching between a red dot and a scope depending on what I am interested in doing that day(3 gun vs bench shooting mosty).

I wouldn't say it retains perfect zero but its pretty close.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 11:25:39 AM EST
I have an Aimpoint Micron in a Larue QD mount and I go back and forth between it and irons so yes It's worth it to me. I also have a scope mounted in rings with a bolt that takes forever to get on and off.
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