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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 1/11/2006 4:07:37 AM EDT
We really need a refinish forum here, with that being said I have given into peer presure and will attempt do the refinish job myself...My question is, What do I need for an airbrush ??? Internal mix ??? External mix ??? Top of the line or basic model ??? I browsed e-bay and found a bazillion choices in a wide variety of price ranges, any help would be appreciated as always..........
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 4:19:18 AM EDT
i used a cheap testors airbrush. worked fine. get a compressor. the cans of propllant suck.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 4:32:59 AM EDT
stickmans write up.

i used a badger 350 with the canned air with no problems.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 4:36:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By eklikwhoa:
stickmans write up.

i used a badger 350 with the canned air with no problems.



I had tagged that write up before, but it is gone now......Thanks I'll re-read that now..
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 5:12:29 AM EDT
I have a Badger 350 coming in.....what size nozzle do you use (fine, medium, course)?
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 5:48:10 AM EDT
External mix airbrushes work fine...like the badger 350...(medium)

Internal mix systems are more likely to clot, harder to clean and are overkill for refinishing firearms. (As an airbrush illustrator, I used to have more money tied up in airbrush equipment than firearms)

My biggest tip: Avoid using the canned air, invest in an air compressor (or rent one).

Other than that, good preprep is king. Be maticulous & take your time. (90% preprep and 10% production)
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 6:08:09 AM EDT
What pressure do these operate at?

Link Posted: 1/11/2006 7:19:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2006 7:20:47 AM EDT by moosemcnally]
Hello ,
I have done modeling stuff and gun refinishing for some time. I have used Duracoat quite a bit.

I would recomend an external mixer in single action because they are easier to clean between colors, less complicated, and generally harder to !?%($#&% up.

I personally prefer the Paashce single actions. I haven't had any experience with the less expensive X-mart stuff, but I have heard of good results.

You can find used good airbrushes on Ebay cheaply sometime because people who are serious airbrushers eventually upgrade to double action.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 8:12:16 AM EDT
I've used the cheap $15 testors brush and canned air on all my refinish jobs (10+) and have never had a problem.The secret is to keep the canned air in a glass of warm water so it doesn't freeze up and change pressure.

BTW that's my A1 at the bottom of stickmans guide,that was my very first refinishing job.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 8:56:22 AM EDT
Thanks for all the info, I'm off to e-bay for more browsing !!
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 9:13:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2006 9:18:35 AM EDT by Dog1]

Originally Posted By Tread1:
I've used the cheap $15 testors brush and canned air on all my refinish jobs (10+) and have never had a problem.The secret is to keep the canned air in a glass of warm water so it doesn't freeze up and change pressure.

BTW that's my A1 at the bottom of stickmans guide,that was my very first refinishing job.



Yep that's good info..I'm using a cheap external mix Testors as well. If you have a Hobby Lobby near you, go online and sign up for their internet coupons. They always have 40 and 50% off any regular priced item, and they have Testors, Paashce and Badger as well as compressors and accessories for airbrushes.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 9:47:43 AM EDT
I went with a Badger 350 from e-bay.....
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 10:03:17 AM EDT
While I agree that cans can be kept pressurized by heating them, I still don't care for them. They just don't last long enough. I have a small compressor which I use frequently, but I also have a portable air tank from Midwest Products with a regulator. It holds up to 125 psi, and lasts through quite a few sessions. A big plus is that it's quiet. Just fill it up and the local Stop and Rob once in a while. The whole setup was probably no more than $75.00, but I think it was way less. Either way, with a compressor or air tank, you need a moisture trap. Here in Texas, even that doesn't work all of the time due to the high humidity. Nothing sucks worse than having your airbrush spit water into a a laquer or enamel paint job.
The ultimate solution is to get a CO2 bottle with a regulator. I have a small portable one. It's quiet, moisture free, and last quite a while. It is a little more costly though, in the long run.
As for my airbrush, I've been using the same Paasche single action since 1983. It beats the hell out of my first rig-one of those cheapo $10.00 airbrushes, which I ran off of a spare tire.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 10:20:01 AM EDT
I'm back from e-bay, scored a Badger compressor also......Wouldn't it suck if after all this I manage to screw up the actual refinish job itself ?????
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 10:39:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Tread1:


BTW that's my A1 at the bottom of stickmans guide,that was my very first refinishing job.




Yes it is, and it looked too good to pass up on posting. Even after the guide was rewritten, it stayed as I think its a good looking rifle with a good looking refinishing job.

Now that I have used up all of my compliments for the day, I return you to your regular scheduled complaints, petty bickering, and ARF flavor of the week threads.....
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 11:45:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By infsqdldr:
i used a cheap testors airbrush. worked fine. get a compressor. the cans of propllant suck.


+1
single action, external mix, $65 at wally world. works great. use it a lot for applying norrells moly resin
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 12:47:20 PM EDT
I picked up a used Paasche D500 Compressor last night at a pawn shop for $31.25. They are $159.00 on the Paasche website. The hose is ok, it ran great, but I will replace hose and install a regulater for less than $50.00. Still well under retail for the compressor alone.

Gonna try my Mossberg 500 first.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 3:41:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2006 3:41:39 PM EDT by JosephR]
Double action is nice for getting into nooks and crannies. You don't want one button that when pressed lets out a torrent of paint and air...



I use a Badger Anthem 155 and a teeny weenie air compressor that goes put put put...
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 4:47:26 PM EDT
Sorry to bring this up from the dead but I have an air compressor (5hp?) and by looking at these kits it just doesn't look like the hookups will attach to it.

I was hoping any air compressor would work.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 5:16:31 PM EDT
It will work. You need to get an adapter is all. I have a Badger adapter that has attaches to an air compressor and then immediately necks down to the tiny 1/8" or so fitting for the airbrush.

It's this:



you can find it HERE
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 5:32:30 PM EDT
I can't comment on refinishing rifles, yet. Gearing up for an attempt on mine right now. But I have many years of airbrushing experience.

BRUSHES:
An internal mix DA brush is the best and most versatile type, but as with many high-end products it is harder to use and easier to screw up than the cheapo external mix SA units.

AIR SUPPLIES:
The canned air can work well for small applications. For large volume jobs there are two drawbacks; one, you'll go broke over time buying them; two, the decompression causes drastic temperature fluctuations if you move a lot of air in a short period of time which affects the spray pattern. I used a small 1/2-hp Craftsman air-compressor for years with good results on models, it was when I tried to do small pencil-sized lines that I noticed the pulsing of the air supply. To avoid that you really need to use a tank on your compressor, plus most units with the tank allow you to dial-in more or less pressure.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 5:33:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2006 5:34:42 PM EDT by Dragonfly228]
I have a cheap double action paache and use a $90 compressor from checker autoparts and it works fine. Though sometimes it scares the crap out of me when it kicks on durring a quiet airbrushing session in my basement. As for pressure, I typically use about 20psi while using KG gunkote. You can vary the spray and pattern depending on the paint flow, air pressure, distance you hold it from your object, and the speed that you move. Tweaking any one of those variables will give you better or worse results. If you are new to it all, I would suggest fixing as many ariables as you can (20 psi and medium flow rate) and then just make it work with your hands (speed and distance of your hands). Do a couple of test shots on some scrap first. Teh advantage of the KG is that it is totally reversable and undoable until you bake it.



PS> The stock and EO hood are new, and clean which is why they look so bright in the picture.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 5:39:37 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 6:55:03 PM EDT
dragonfly228. sweet. what is that color. been thinkin about a grey also. battleship/gunmetal.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 9:36:22 PM EDT
Now you say 90% prep.... so brake cleaner and lint-less cloth then spray won't give good results?
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 3:36:56 AM EDT
i sprayed with brake cleaner, heated, wiped with acetone then sprayed.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:22:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 18Bravo:
While I agree that cans can be kept pressurized by heating them, I still don't care for them. They just don't last long enough. I have a small compressor which I use frequently, but I also have a portable air tank from Midwest Products with a regulator. It holds up to 125 psi, and lasts through quite a few sessions. A big plus is that it's quiet. Just fill it up and the local Stop and Rob once in a while. The whole setup was probably no more than $75.00, but I think it was way less. Either way, with a compressor or air tank, you need a moisture trap. Here in Texas, even that doesn't work all of the time due to the high humidity. Nothing sucks worse than having your airbrush spit water into a a laquer or enamel paint job.
The ultimate solution is to get a CO2 bottle with a regulator. I have a small portable one. It's quiet, moisture free, and last quite a while. It is a little more costly though, in the long run.
As for my airbrush, I've been using the same Paasche single action since 1983. It beats the hell out of my first rig-one of those cheapo $10.00 airbrushes, which I ran off of a spare tire.



Very interesting. Maybe I don't need a dedicated air brush compressor after all.

(I too just got a Badger 350 from e-bay. $20 shipped seemed a good price.)
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:15:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eklikwhoa:
i sprayed with brake cleaner, heated, wiped with acetone then sprayed.



Now I am intrigued..... thanks!
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:22:36 PM EDT
I just finished doing the CAR-15 with Norrell's Colt Gray/Black-



I used a Testors single action airbrush with external mix and an Testors Electric Blue Compressor. I use the compressor for models, so I had it on hand.

I cleaned the parts with Brake Cleaner and let dry. One thing I did change is that instead of a hairdryer to warm the parts, I used a heat gun.

I found the heat gun produced a better heat range and the parts held the warmth longer as I sprayed.

Clean up was ultra easy, with Laquer Thinner.

I credit Stickman's re-finishing guide in helping me complete the project with a awesome outcome.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:28:37 PM EDT
Awesome, I got a heat gun laying around, just what I need.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 5:38:47 PM EDT
You can also just get an "air tank." I've seen then at Wal-Mart for around $20. Then take it to the nearest service station that will fill it for you for cheap/free. You may want a regulator to go along with the valve, just to keep things consistent.

I got a Campbell/Hausfeld compressor with a 2 gallon tank and it works great for any airbrush task. It came with a regulator, and though it's kind of loud, you already have hearing protection, right?

Anyway, this compressor has 1001 uses beyond powering an airbrush.
Link Posted: 1/27/2006 6:25:00 PM EDT
Tag
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 9:49:14 PM EDT
I use my shooting muffs for lots of odd jobs.... like exhaust repair on my car. Welding, grinding, etc. All done with shooters muffs.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 9:55:37 PM EDT
I got the badger model recommended HERE. I think it's the same one Stickman recommends in his refinishing thread. Workd great.

+1 on the idea of a refinishing forum. Even if it was only a few tacked threads and a little discussion, it would be an invaluable resource when folks got around to that refinishing project. I nominate Stickman for moderator
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 9:57:34 PM EDT
For large coverage I just bought one of These Detail brushes from Harbor freight. I works perfect.

When I finally decide to do some camo stuff I have a good Badger laying around here.
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