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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/30/2003 3:46:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 3:47:17 PM EDT
al gore?
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:03:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Faction:
al gore?




I thought it was the internet
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:06:59 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Red_Faction:
al gore?



That’s real funny Red. I’m still chuckling after a few minutes.



CAMPY,

Gotta disagree with you on one of em though.

Father of modern rocketry was Robert Goddard

Goddard was applying for patents and playing with multiple rocket stages, expansion nozzles and liquid fuel about the time von Braun was born.

-J

Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:23:26 PM EDT
I'm not going to Googlecheat the answer for the television stuffs, but...

Being as I used to work for Marconi (the company, not Guglielmo), I've seen the little intra-company pamphlets that went around all about the history of Marconi and stuff.

Marconi and Tesla supposedly studied together (some say that Marconi was Tesla's student) - it's questionable who came up with the stuff first - but Marconi demonstrated it first, and brought it to market.

Interesting tidbit (though probably not that obscure) - There was no radio operator on the Titanic. There was, however, a Marconi operator.
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:39:13 PM EDT
The television..........I'm not gonna cheat either. I'm not sure who invented TV but the first practical application was the Olympics in Germany in the 1930's. Jesse Owens waxed the Germans (everyone else too) and frosted Hitler's ass.

Rocketry..........I can't recall the name but the guy was a school teacher in some remote part of Russia. Strictly a theoretician. I believe he may have published a small book on the subject. He pre-dated Goddard.
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:40:47 PM EDT
Philo Farnsworth.

Sounds like a name from an old radio show but he was the man with the plan. Got the idea for
painting the picture on the tube by scanning rows from watching wheat cut in feilds.
No Google, so I'll be contacting you about the
ATF transfer for the new AK-74 I just won.

Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:45:48 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:51:01 PM EDT
Here's one for the group.

We all will 'probably' agree that Maxim invented the machine gun while he was in Europe. Why was Maxim, an American, in Europe and who paid him to get out of the US ??
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 4:57:16 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 5:00:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 5:12:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 5subslr5:
Here's one for the group.

We all will 'probably' agree that Maxim invented the machine gun while he was in Europe. Why was Maxim, an American, in Europe and who paid him to get out of the US ??



I'm heading out so here's the answer: Maxim was in Europe because Thomas Alva Edison PAID him to get out of the US. Seems that Maxim was too successful inventing things that were electrical so Edison bought off the competition.

Maxim invented the machine gun because he thought such a deadly weapon would stop all wars. (Sounds sort of like that guy who invented dynamite.)
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 5:15:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 5subslr5:

Rocketry..........I can't recall the name but the guy was a school teacher in some remote part of Russia. Strictly a theoretician. I believe he may have published a small book on the subject. He pre-dated Goddard.



Is Vladimir Zworykin the name of my Russian school teacher ??
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 6:02:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 5subslr5:

Originally Posted By 5subslr5:
Here's one for the group.

We all will 'probably' agree that Maxim invented the machine gun while he was in Europe. Why was Maxim, an American, in Europe and who paid him to get out of the US ??



I'm heading out so here's the answer: Maxim was in Europe because Thomas Alva Edison PAID him to get out of the US. Seems that Maxim was too successful inventing things that were electrical so Edison bought off the competition.

Maxim invented the machine gun because he thought such a deadly weapon would stop all wars. (Sounds sort of like that guy who invented dynamite.)



I thought Maxim invented the machine gun because a friend advised him if he wanted to make money in europe he could invent something that would let those damn europeans kill each other faster.
But then again I might be confused...

Philo Farnsworth, unknown super genious or satans best operative?
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 6:24:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/30/2003 10:37:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 5subslr5:
Maxim invented the machine gun because he thought such a deadly weapon would stop all wars. (Sounds sort of like that guy who invented dynamite.)


Sounds like the same train of thought as Richard Gatling and his gun.

-J
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 3:16:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2003 3:18:39 AM EDT by CAMPYBOB]
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 3:25:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 3:53:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
the telephone? easy! alexander graham bell.



IIRC Bell beat another inventer to the patent office by half an hour for the telephone. Don't recall the name though.

No idea who invented the TV. I think it was an offshoot of some type of military radar equipment or some such thing.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 6:54:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
lol! campy...miss rsa...and a pair of maxim's!
men want me dead?!?!?!?! damn! that must be those guyz over at da nutz!

although several germans, the russian immigrant to the u.s. (then working for westinghouse) lay some claim to inventing the television some component/theory of television, it is actually philo t. farnsworth (never heard of him, did you?) that is credited with perfecting the first workable television and he was the first to successfully demo it.

he beat the russian immigrant by months and without the backing of a westinghouse.

there were actually several practical broadcasts prior to the 1936 olympics. it is interesting to note that the olympics were 'televised' using farnsworth and rca supplied equipment.

as far as receptor tv sets, the broadcast was received at public 'vioewing booths', and not in homes in any numbers (i rather doubt that germany had 10 tv sets in the entire country at the time).

yes, philo t. farnsworth is name you never hear in classrooms, in advertisemets, in text books or on the lips of those that watch the tv for many hours each week.

now....why is it that way?






Because Philo (couldn't remember the name until I saw it again) was a teenager. I don't remember who it was, but someone we all know (Westinghouse, maybe?), some adult basically stole the design from Philo before the youngster could patent his invention.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 7:21:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 7:28:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By KenR_RedStarArms:
Who is this MAXIM everyone is talking about. From the books I read Campybob invented the belt fed and had many adventures with it before inventing what we today call Adult content.

I offer this proof of my claim.

www.redstararms.com/cb44.jpg

Ken RSA


That contraption clearly doesn't have enough rust on it to be the campybob pimpmobile.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 8:16:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2003 8:21:41 AM EDT by Forest]

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
ahah!

you know that werner von braun is the father of modern rocketry.

i said "modern" rocketry.



Goddard is the fatther of "Modern" rocketry.
www.gsfc.nasa.gov/gsfc/service/gallery/fact_sheets/general/goddard/goddard.htm

I've been to the space center bearing his name several times. Here is a quote from NASA's bio on him:


The father of modern rocket propulsion is the American, Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard. .... By 1926, Goddard had constructed and tested successfully the first rocket using liquid fuel. Indeed, the flight of Goddard's rocket on March 16,1926, at Auburn, Massachusetts, was a feat as epochal in history as that of the Wright brothers at Kitty Hawk. Yet, it was one of Goddard's "firsts" in the now booming significance of rocket propulsion in the fields of military missilery and the scientific exploration of space. .... Goddard's work largely anticipated in technical detail the later German V-2 missiles, including gyroscopic control, steering by means of vanes in the jet stream of the rocket motor, gimbalsteering, power-driven fuel pumps and other devices. His rocket flight in 1929 carried the first scientific payload, a barometer, and a camera. Goddard developed and demonstrated the basic idea of the "bazooka" two days before the Armistice in 1918 at the Aberdeen Proving Ground

Link Posted: 10/31/2003 8:24:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
yes, philo t. farnsworth is name you never hear in classrooms, in advertisemets, in text books or on the lips of those that watch the tv for many hours each week.

now....why is it that way?



Because HDRs father banned him?
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 9:33:13 AM EDT
I believe there was no single inventor of the TV. Different guys come up with pieces of technology over time.

I have read that one man got the lions share of the credit for putting it all together.

Dr. Lee Deforest.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 12:15:57 PM EDT
Campy, I really didn't think it was a big secret that Farnsworth invented the TV. He was quite a guy. I always say "people who live in glass houses shouldn't invent the television"...or something like that.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 2:20:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 6:55:44 AM EDT
WhoooHooooo

Was operating from memory there. A bit hazy, but essentially on track.

Link Posted: 11/2/2003 11:51:54 AM EDT

I knew about Philo T. Farnsworth.. but the point Campy is making is a good one.

What we don't know and WHY we don't know it is that every institution has an agenda.

The mass media only wants to present their economic agenda. The mass educations system (Eg: Government schools) only want to indoctrinate good, unquestioning taxpayers. The corporations we interact with usually aren't in teh education business. DotNutz only wants to spread its economic agenda and suppress free thought. And thanks to the government schools and bolstered by some mind numbing from Philos invention, most people don't stop to questions. Hell, and those who aren't numbed by the mass media or government schools have bought a faith hook line and sinker and dont' think beyond what they are told to think on sunday mornings.

All the major insittutions in society teach people not to think, and not to question.

And so, for the most part, they don't.

IT is only the people who, like Winston Smith, are confronted with a contradiction directly, who break out and have to think for themselves.

Unfortunately this level of "mind control" works pretty well... most people don't want ot have to think too much.

That's why nerds are hated in school rather than respected, etc.

And until people start thinking for themselves ,they will never respect the constitution.
Link Posted: 11/2/2003 4:17:53 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/2/2003 9:53:47 PM EDT
I actually hear about Philo once a year on the local news. He was a native of Utah, got the idea for the T.V. while living in Idaho. I see one of his grand neices once a week when she comes into my store.
Link Posted: 11/3/2003 3:30:15 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/3/2003 3:47:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/3/2003 3:49:44 PM EDT by noah]

Originally Posted By CAMPYBOB:
...and we know why philo is one of history's forgotten men.




The United States Postal Service remembered Farnsworth in 1983 . . .

www.unicover.com/EA1CCEYB.htm

IMO he's not as forgotten as perhaps believed, but that's a matter of opinion.

You make a good point about the "why" behind the Farnsworth / Zworykin / Sarnoff saga, and another little-known bit of history to come out of that saga was the gov't breakup in the early 30s of the business relationship betw. Westinghouse, General Electric, and the Radio Corporation of America.

That breakup set the stage for David Sarnoff, then in his early 40s, to assume total control of RCA and its fledgling broadcast unit, the National Broadcasting Co. At about the same time, Sarnoff's RCA/NBC organization occupied the first of an eventual 27 properties developed by John D. Rockefeller in Midtown Manhattan. A 70-story gray granite art deco skyscraper at 30 Rockefeller Plaza, it is the home of NBC, ironically again owned by GE. What goes around comes around.

RCA? It exists as a brand name only, owned by the French electronics firm Thomson.

Noah
Link Posted: 11/3/2003 3:53:02 PM EDT
Since we are in an Obscure History bee of sorts here:

Who was Jethro Tull?
What was he famous for, farmboy?

(and answer without Googleaid, too!)

Noah
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