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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 1/30/2006 6:16:38 PM EDT
I was wondering if anyone knew where I could find a wooden bakelite magazine for the ak47, I know they are really common for the ak74s, but seem to be very rare for the 7.62 aks... While searching, I came across a Russian one, but they said it was rare and were asking a lot for it.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:31:04 PM EDT
they pop up from time to time and go about $100
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:49:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
they pop up from time to time and go about $100



damn.. I want one.. but not enough to spend 100 dollars on a magazine.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 7:00:04 PM EDT
i got one chinese to go with my pre-89 polytech.

that's enough for me
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:28:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MillerTime85:
I was wondering if anyone knew where I could find a wooden bakelite magazine for the ak47, I know they are really common for the ak74s, but seem to be very rare for the 7.62 aks... While searching, I came across a Russian one, but they said it was rare and were asking a lot for it.



what you mean by "wooden bakelight", orange?
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 9:10:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/30/2006 9:14:21 PM EDT by MillerTime85]
ya, but they arent just orange, they appear to be wooden... You can see grains in some of them. I thought about getting a flat polymer black mag and painting it, but as you can see in some of these pics, www.ak47.net/forums/topic.html?b=4&f=79&t=50023&page=11 ... It looks like there is more to it then just orange. (scroll down a ways)
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 5:44:27 AM EDT
BAKELITE THE FACTS:


Bakelite, was discovered by accident in 1907 by a Belgian born chemist, Dr Leo Baekeland(1863-1944). Having moved to New York he inadvertently created the first completely man made liquid resin, which he named Bakelite

Baekeland had already made his fortune by developing a photographic paper(Velox),which he subsequently sold to the Eastman Kodak company. This made him a millionaire overnight.

Not having any financial constraints Baekeland developed an apparatus which he called a Bakeliser (SEE OPPOSITE >>>). This pot like apparatus developed a new liquid resin which rapidly hardened and took the shape of it's container. It would form an exact replica of any vessel which contained it.

This new material would not burn,boil,melt or dissolve in any common acid or solvent of the time. Once it was firmly set, it would never change. This type of plastic is called a thermo-set plastic.

Realising the importance of his discovery Baekeland patented Bakelite in 1909. In fact Baekeland beat a close rival by only one day with his heat and pressure patent. It was the first thermosetting phenol formaldehyde resin. Eventually other companies produced similar phenolics, but nowadays unless marked it is impossible to identify individual pieces by their manufacturers (see my Trademarks page). Phenolics in general are commonly given a generic name, ie- Bakelite. Much as many vacuum cleaners are termed-"hoovers".

Bakelite was used normally for consumer goods and usually contained large amounts of wood flour or other fillers. Normally found in black, or other very dark colours. In the early days Ox's blood was even used as a natural pigmentation aid. Bakelite is a generic trade name for a substance called Phenol Formaldehyde. A later evolvement from Bakelite was Urea Formaldehyde (early 1930's). The development of Urea enabled manufacturers to obtain a wide variety of colours not previously available.

Bakelite was called the material of a thousand uses, it's amazing to actually realise what was achieved and moulded out of the product. Bakelite was waterproof,had a high resistance to electricity,was impervious and above all did not melt. It was widely used in both world wars.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 6:04:08 PM EDT
Very interesting, thanks doneking.

Personally, I'd like to see an AK magazine with real ox blood coloring!
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