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Posted: 7/3/2018 8:30:28 PM EDT
At what distance should I zero an Aero Precision M5 in 6.5 Creedmore with a 24" barrel? The optic is a Nikon Black FX1000 6-24x50 MOA first focal plane.

Should I just do a 100 yard zero or should I zero at a longer distance?

Also, I'll be able to boresight it at 50 yards, should I line up the scope and the target perfectly at 50 yards? Or should I be higher or lower with the crosshairs and the center of the target when boresighting at 50 yards?

Thanks,

T2
Link Posted: 7/3/2018 9:51:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/3/2018 10:11:50 PM EDT by SuperDutyMikeMc]
The zero distance is up to you, but I zero all my rifles in at 100 regardless (to include my .260 Rem M5). In theory there is a slight advantage to sighting in at distances further than 100 if you're going to be rapidly shooting targets at extended ranges (i.e. it takes less adjustment to hit at 500 yard target with a 200 yard zero than it does from a 100 yard zero). Practically speaking though, you really won't realize the advantage unless you're shooting a timed comp etc.

Regarding the bore sighting of the rifle, it's typically easier to do at 100 yards vs closer in. Separate the upper from the lower, and pull the BCG/Charging Handle. Look down the bore and get your target perfectly centered while you're looking down the barrel. Then, without touching the upper look through the scope to see where you are in relation to the sight picture you have looking down the barrel. In most cases (at least with picatinny mounts/rings) you should already be relatively close. If you need to adjust the, it'll be helpful to have a second pair of hands close by to hold the upper in place while you make any adjustments. The goal here is to get the two sight pictures (through the scope, and down the barrel) to be as aligned as possible.

You can absolutely bore sight closer if you want, but it won't affect the outcome; at closer distances it can be more difficult as the target (depending on the size) will take up more of your site picture down the bore.

That said, ARs with picatinny based mounts are usually very close to aligned out of the box (within 0-12" in any direction at ~100 yards). Assuming this is a new scope and you haven't been randomly dialing the knobs without returning your scope to zero, you can probably just mount the thing and start shooting at 100; it should be pretty easy to tell where you're hitting; then make the necessary adjustments.

Edit: Just looked up that scope; you'd also want to setup your zero stops immediately after getting your rifle sighted in at the range you want. Just know that with a setup like this, you shouldn't be holding for elevation/windage; you'll be dialing your elevation adjustments into the scope, so the discussion about "what distance to zero" is different than folks talking about "battle zeros" and whatnot.

It's also probably smart to leave your scope power turned down while you're firing the first few shots. If you can see the impacts through the scope, the FFP reticle should tell you exactly what windage/elevation adjustments to make.

This video will demonstrate the concept, only you're doing it on an AR vs. a bolt gun.

Link Posted: 7/3/2018 11:16:25 PM EDT
Zero it for 100yds. You’ve got a zero stop, so you won’t get lost in what you’ve dialed once set. You can always go to that zero point. From your zero, you’ll always be dialing up, even for closer ranges (not that it really matters for most applications).

You’ll likely be .6-.75” low at 50yds for a 100yd zero depending on ammo and scope height.

Enjoy, and be sure to post your results. Be sure to feed it some quality ammo! I’d suggest the Hornady 140gr Eld-m match ammo and possibly the Federal gold medal match (FGMM) 130 Berger load. The FGMM load is on the warm side, so it can be too hot for some gas guns.
Link Posted: 7/4/2018 2:56:48 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By SuperJlarge:

Enjoy, and be sure to post your results. Be sure to feed it some quality ammo! I’d suggest the Hornady 140gr Eld-m match ammo and possibly the Federal gold medal match (FGMM) 130 Berger load. The FGMM load is on the warm side, so it can be too hot for some gas guns.
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Thanks for the additional info.

I’m about to start building my 6.5 CM ammo fort.
Link Posted: 7/4/2018 8:24:04 PM EDT
Thank you very much everyone!!!
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