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Posted: 12/27/2021 9:46:18 AM EDT
House is a mid 70's tri-level so one roof is about 4' higher than the other.  I have a 20' metal conduit mast attached to the lower roof and to the upper roof's fascia board so I have about 16' of metal conduit above the upper roof.  My dipole is attached

I am going to add another 10' of conduit to move the antenna up higher to see if that helps cut down noise and increase propogation.

Should I clamp a ground wire to the conduit at the lower roof attachment point and run that ground across the roof, down the side of the garage to the 8' ground rod I ground my radio to?  

I'm thinking lightning strikes but would the add'l ground help the antenna?
Link Posted: 12/27/2021 10:52:43 AM EDT
[#1]
Yes, you absolutely, positively need to ground that pipe.  Right now all you have is an ungrounded lightning rod.
Link Posted: 12/27/2021 11:10:44 AM EDT
[#2]
You may have issues with that much mast unguyed above the roof, too. Usually the rule of thumb is 10' between guy levels.

Link Posted: 12/27/2021 11:39:13 AM EDT
[#3]
radial ground
Link Posted: 12/27/2021 2:37:49 PM EDT
[#4]
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Quoted:
You may have issues with that much mast unguyed above the roof, too. Usually the rule of thumb is 10' between guy levels.

View Quote


If it works better than the current setup I will be installing a couple of spring loaded guy wires to help stabilize it.  The dipole has very little wind resistance and the conduit is attached to the house at two locations.
Link Posted: 1/25/2022 11:37:52 PM EDT
[#5]
What size conduit are you using?  I *assume* it's galvanized to prevent rust?

Also what are you using to mount the mast to the house?

Thanks,

Link Posted: 1/27/2022 11:22:03 PM EDT
[#6]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
What size conduit are you using?  I *assume* it's galvanized to prevent rust?

Also what are you using to mount the mast to the house?

Thanks,

View Quote


1" IMC.  It's mounted to the lower roof with a roof mount plate and attached to the fascia of the upper roof, about 4' above the lower roof.  Not ideal but if I add four guy wires it will do okay.  

And if it fails and puts a hole in my roof I file a claim for a new roof ;)
Link Posted: 1/28/2022 1:49:00 PM EDT
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


1" IMC.  It's mounted to the lower roof with a roof mount plate and attached to the fascia of the upper roof, about 4' above the lower roof.  Not ideal but if I add four guy wires it will do okay.  

And if it fails and puts a hole in my roof I file a claim for a new roof ;)
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
What size conduit are you using?  I *assume* it's galvanized to prevent rust?

Also what are you using to mount the mast to the house?

Thanks,



1" IMC.  It's mounted to the lower roof with a roof mount plate and attached to the fascia of the upper roof, about 4' above the lower roof.  Not ideal but if I add four guy wires it will do okay.  

And if it fails and puts a hole in my roof I file a claim for a new roof ;)
For those that have no clue what IMC is:  Intermediate Metal Conduit
Link Posted: 1/28/2022 5:48:13 PM EDT
[#8]
Definitely ground it, and makes sure the ground rod is tied to the house service ground.

A neaby lightning strike dissapating though the ground can cause several thousand volts potential difference between the two systems if this isn't done.

Lightning is nothing to screw around with. This book should be in every ham shack: LINK
Link Posted: 1/30/2022 9:24:39 AM EDT
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Definitely ground it, and makes sure the ground rod is tied to the house service ground.

A neaby lightning strike dissapating though the ground can cause several thousand volts potential difference between the two systems if this isn't done.

Lightning is nothing to screw around with. This book should be in every ham shack: LINK
View Quote


Unfortunately the ground rods are on opposite sides of the house
Link Posted: 1/30/2022 9:42:19 AM EDT
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Unfortunately the ground rods are on opposite sides of the house
View Quote

I'm in that same situation, plus the ground wire looks to come out the wall about 8-12" high, then make a 45/elbow and goes down through the concrete, of the driveway, then there are several feet of concrete in each direction...  I gotta do some more invistigating....
Link Posted: 1/30/2022 12:20:37 PM EDT
[#11]
Lots of good information in this post on QRZ:

https://forums.qrz.com/index.php?threads/resources-for-antenna-and-station-grounding.756419/

House ground layout with pics and discussion of Poor, Better, Best configurations for homes with opposite sided ground rods:

http://www.w8ji.com/house_ground_layouts.htm

The Best version:




Pretty involved and detailed view of lightning protection.  Most hams don't (or won't) go to this level, but it's important to note the details and follow the principles and techniques as best you can:

https://lightning.org/lightning-protection-overview/

Good luck!
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