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Posted: 7/2/2022 5:16:56 PM EDT
Copied from DIY thread
https://www.ar15.com/forums/General/How-do-you-fix-this-Pole-barn-issue/139-2565800/

We are buying a property with a 100 x 60 pole barn.  The  inspection revealed wood in contact with the ground.  We don't close until August and I am hoping the seller will work with us.  If they don't, not a deal breaker because the property checks all the boxes (rural, no neighbors, acreage, large out building, etc).  I am wondering what to do if it ends up being on me? I know I can try and work with the seller to reduce purchase price in order to get the repairs done.

What is the right way to fix this?  

The outside will require some landscaping but what about the inside where the wood already shows water damage.

The barn was built in 2016.




I am wanting someone local to the Richmond area to take a look at it after we close on the property.
Link Posted: 7/3/2022 12:58:01 AM EDT
[#1]
I am not a pole barn builder.

IMO- the seller is unlikely to see this as a big issue.  Buyers don't have any leverage these days.

If you're really concerned about it, you could excavate the column bases and replace them with a concrete footing.   Bring the concrete up 4-6" above grade and reset the post on the footing. You might have to support the column temporarily while doing this.  The grade boards/girts are only there to support the wall panel.  It's cheaper to replace them in 10 years than do anything drastic.  (If you pour a floor some day, that would be the time to lift them off the ground.)
Link Posted: 7/3/2022 6:05:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: thunderopossom] [#2]
I don’t remember much about pole barns and what not but I’m not seeing that really being an issue.

I think you would have a hard time getting them to fix or pay for it.

ETA: back home most pole barn guys seemed to be Mennonite and very good builders.
Link Posted: 7/3/2022 7:50:01 PM EDT
[#3]
I am going to fix this myself IF it needs it.  I am thinking the landscaping causing it is more important to deal with.

Theres a natural berm behind the building. I need to get a backhoe or something in there to install a French drain that I will tie into the gutter downspouts. All that will run north to a lower spot on the property.

After that is done, I'll deal with the post or hire someone local.

Thanks for the replies.
Link Posted: 7/3/2022 10:18:49 PM EDT
[#4]
As long as the post are treated its no big deal. The black on the post is hopefully a sealer on treated lumber. If not I would walk.

That bottom band needs to treated lumber and it looks like it's probably not. You can cut it out and replace it, it's not fun work but not too hard work.
Link Posted: 7/3/2022 11:15:36 PM EDT
[#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GUNGUY148:
As long as the post are treated its no big deal. The black on the post is hopefully a sealer on treated lumber. If not I would walk.

That bottom band needs to treated lumber and it looks like it's probably not. You can cut it out and replace it, it's not fun work but not too hard work.
View Quote


That's the only area I saw that looks like that.

The property checks every single box on what we want.  Even if the building wasn't there, we would still want the place but at a lesser price
Link Posted: 7/4/2022 10:08:03 AM EDT
[#6]
You're talking about the board along the ground?  I suppose it's a tradeoff between touching the gravel and having easy access for vermin to come in.  You might consider laying some 4" perforated drain tile along the perimeter on the uphill side and backfill with clean rock to help the drainage as well.
Link Posted: 7/4/2022 7:13:08 PM EDT
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By defender:
You're talking about the board along the ground?  I suppose it's a tradeoff between touching the gravel and having easy access for vermin to come in.  You might consider laying some 4" perforated drain tile along the perimeter on the uphill side and backfill with clean rock to help the drainage as well.
View Quote


Yes, the board along the ground and possibly the post to the left of it.

I definitely see some landscaping in my future.
Link Posted: 7/4/2022 11:30:15 PM EDT
[#8]
I know a pole barn builder about 15 minutes from richmond.

If you end up buying it, and want someone to take a look let me know.
Link Posted: 7/5/2022 8:21:23 AM EDT
[#9]
I see the 2 x 10 along the bottom as somewhat of a sacrificial piece of lumber that is the price of making it harder for bigger critters to get in.  I've got a barn with similar post issues on the side with poor drainage.  I've thought about driving 2 7/8" oilfield pipe in next to the rotting 6 x 6's, then somehow mechanically attaching the two.  In the utility world, C trusses (more or less galvanized channel iron) is sometimes banded to rotted poles to give them the strength they need without replacing the pole.
Link Posted: 7/5/2022 5:43:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: blake-b] [#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shootindave:
I know a pole barn builder about 15 minutes from richmond.

If you end up buying it, and want someone to take a look let me know.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Shootindave:
I know a pole barn builder about 15 minutes from richmond.

If you end up buying it, and want someone to take a look let me know.


It is all but a done deal.  The house we are selling went under contract today and we had a contingency with the place in Richmond so unless something comes out of the blue...  Please send me the contact info when you get a chance.

Originally Posted By Buckshot4U:
I see the 2 x 10 along the bottom as somewhat of a sacrificial piece of lumber that is the price of making it harder for bigger critters to get in.  I've got a barn with similar post issues on the side with poor drainage.  I've thought about driving 2 7/8" oilfield pipe in next to the rotting 6 x 6's, then somehow mechanically attaching the two.  In the utility world, C trusses (more or less galvanized channel iron) is sometimes banded to rotted poles to give them the strength they need without replacing the pole.


I looked into various ways to fix or strengthen the vertical pole.  One of them was as you describe - a metal piece is driven down around the post and then bolts are ran through to connect them.
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