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Posted: 1/7/2021 8:41:00 PM EST
So I’m remodeling my basement, and during this process, my washing machine died. In order to get that out of its spot, i had to remove the washing machine, which involved taking out the slop sink. Shut the valves off, and all was fine. Put a 5g bucket under the valves just in case.

Well, went down today and a slow drip has the bucket full. So now looking what’s the best route to take. Watched a little YouTube and they said to try and tighten a 1/4 turn or so B (on the valve). I’m thinking i May be better served to just replace from the valves to the sink (pex?). Any help, or advice, is appreciated.

Sorry for the rambling, venting after a long day.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 5:39:32 AM EST
Turning on the nut usually works once or twice. Definitely try it.
Link Posted: 1/8/2021 9:29:23 AM EST
Sometimes, on valves that don't get used much, when you shut them off, they leak. But, when you turn them back on, they stop.
Link Posted: 1/9/2021 12:45:06 AM EST
pics are always helpful
Link Posted: 1/13/2021 12:53:14 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SR712:
Sometimes, on valves that don't get used much, when you shut them off, they leak. But, when you turn them back on, they stop.
View Quote


This has been a problem with stop vales for many many years.

Buildup on the rubber contact surfaces accumulates and the valve will not close completely.

I have long made it a habit to operate every stop valve at lease one a quarter.

Any that fail to close completely are marked for replacement the next time I
have by soldering equipment out (B-tank and air-acetylene Goss torch).

When I was doing a lot of renovation work I paid for the B-tank.
had it for years now.
Exchange it when it gets empty.

Use it with oxygen for oxy-acetylene welding and cutting.





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