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Posted: 1/21/2020 3:11:29 AM EDT
Is it really just 138? It's a MK VI and any other one I can find online has a full 5-6 digit S/N. I don't see any information that leads me to believe that these were numbered in series like a Luger where the numbers would repeat with different prefixes nor do I find a serial number elsewhere on the firearm, including under the grips.

Attachment Attached File


Shown hinged open so you can see the matching number on the frame and barrel.
Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 1/21/2020 5:12:27 PM EDT
What year is marked on the other side? There should also be a matching number on the cylinder.
Link Posted: 1/21/2020 5:34:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2020 5:35:06 PM EDT by Dracster]
What other markings are on the frame?
Pictures of same?
Link Posted: 1/21/2020 6:14:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2020 6:17:52 PM EDT by SageEBR]
I can get more pictures later when I get home, it's mostly an extremely British number of proof stamps, I don't recall anything standing out to me as a date but I may have missed it.

There is no serial number on the cylinder I can see BUT it was milled for .45 acp (Sadly) and I am not sure if it would have been in that sliver that was shaved off.

Also, it may be hard to see in the photo but as I was looking it over it became apparent to me that the sideplate on the side shown in the picture has at some point been sanded down and reblued with the rest of the pistol left in it's original finish. Strangely, later after that someone else then (rather poorly) scratched ANZAC into it.

I have absolutely no idea where this came from before I got it years ago as a spur of the moment gunshop purchase so I have no background on it.
Link Posted: 1/21/2020 10:38:51 PM EDT
Here is the best I can do, this effectively captures every marking on the other side of the gun. Looking closely at the cylinder it does appear there is something extremely worn that may have been the serial number, I can't make out in person and it comes through even worse in the photo.

Pardon the large picture but that is going to give the best resolution.

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 1/22/2020 8:50:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/22/2020 8:52:08 AM EDT by JPK]
The marking on the cylinder appear to be British proof marks

ETA: perhaps re-proof marks?
Link Posted: 1/22/2020 9:58:36 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/22/2020 10:04:53 AM EDT by Dracster]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JPK:
The marking on the cylinder appear to be British proof marks

ETA: perhaps re-proof marks?
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Export proofs. The Brit Proof House Laws require anything leaving the country to have the various test marks.

OP, it's been reserial'd. You can see a shelf in front of the trigger guard. That part should be the same height from the end of the trigger guard forward. It's also obviously hand-stamped given the orientation of the numbers.
Link Posted: 1/22/2020 11:07:24 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Export proofs. The Brit Proof House Laws require anything leaving the country to have the various test marks.

OP, it's been reserial'd. You can see a shelf in front of the trigger guard. That part should be the same height from the end of the trigger guard forward. It's also obviously hand-stamped given the orientation of the numbers.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By JPK:
The marking on the cylinder appear to be British proof marks

ETA: perhaps re-proof marks?
Export proofs. The Brit Proof House Laws require anything leaving the country to have the various test marks.

OP, it's been reserial'd. You can see a shelf in front of the trigger guard. That part should be the same height from the end of the trigger guard forward. It's also obviously hand-stamped given the orientation of the numbers.
Interesting, any idea if this a known practice that some arsenal did on these during a refurbish process or is it more likely this entire pistol was worked over by a gunsmith? I have never been able to find much on these like I have been able to find on many other military pistols over the years.
Link Posted: 1/23/2020 11:27:32 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SageEBR:
Interesting, any idea if this a known practice that some arsenal did on these during a refurbish process or is it more likely this entire pistol was worked over by a gunsmith? I have never been able to find much on these like I have been able to find on many other military pistols over the years.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SageEBR:
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By JPK:
The marking on the cylinder appear to be British proof marks

ETA: perhaps re-proof marks?
Export proofs. The Brit Proof House Laws require anything leaving the country to have the various test marks.

OP, it's been reserial'd. You can see a shelf in front of the trigger guard. That part should be the same height from the end of the trigger guard forward. It's also obviously hand-stamped given the orientation of the numbers.
Interesting, any idea if this a known practice that some arsenal did on these during a refurbish process or is it more likely this entire pistol was worked over by a gunsmith? I have never been able to find much on these like I have been able to find on many other military pistols over the years.
No idea. The Brits converted many to .45 ACP since we gave them a bunch of Colt and S&W M1917s as Lend Lease. I doubt they would reserial though. The bad part is a standard .45 ACP/AR load is the same pressure as a .455 proof load. A steady diet can burst the cylinder.
Link Posted: 1/23/2020 1:01:33 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dracster:
No idea. The Brits converted many to .45 ACP since we gave them a bunch of Colt and S&W M1917s as Lend Lease. I doubt they would reserial though. The bad part is a standard .45 ACP/AR load is the same pressure as a .455 proof load. A steady diet can burst the cylinder.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By SageEBR:
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By JPK:
The marking on the cylinder appear to be British proof marks

ETA: perhaps re-proof marks?
Export proofs. The Brit Proof House Laws require anything leaving the country to have the various test marks.

OP, it's been reserial'd. You can see a shelf in front of the trigger guard. That part should be the same height from the end of the trigger guard forward. It's also obviously hand-stamped given the orientation of the numbers.
Interesting, any idea if this a known practice that some arsenal did on these during a refurbish process or is it more likely this entire pistol was worked over by a gunsmith? I have never been able to find much on these like I have been able to find on many other military pistols over the years.
No idea. The Brits converted many to .45 ACP since we gave them a bunch of Colt and S&W M1917s as Lend Lease. I doubt they would reserial though. The bad part is a standard .45 ACP/AR load is the same pressure as a .455 proof load. A steady diet can burst the cylinder.
Yes, years back I initially got this on a whim just so I could shoot .45 through it then while also enjoying it as one of the neatest looking revolvers of all time. Once I read up on it and the pressure difference, I decided that was a bad idea and have only ever run a handful through. I am considering selling to fund a real .45acp revolver so was trying to figure out what it even is before I do that.

It is interesting to me that anzac is scratched into the side because that would be the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps and so I can't help but wonder if it was re-arsenaled and transferred to them before being given to a bored soldier who thought it was too plain looking and decided to decorate their revolver.  The re-serialing obviously is throwing me for a loop because it looks like any finish it has is applied over the top, which is why I am leaning towards an arsenal having done it. It's also likely that then sometime after it made it to the states was when the .45 acp conversion as made but that is all speculation as I can't find a lot of info on these at all or anything even similar.
Link Posted: 2/10/2020 8:33:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2020 11:03:47 AM EDT by rlc]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SageEBR:
Yes, years back I initially got this on a whim just so I could shoot .45 through it then while also enjoying it as one of the neatest looking revolvers of all time. Once I read up on it and the pressure difference, I decided that was a bad idea and have only ever run a handful through. I am considering selling to fund a real .45acp revolver so was trying to figure out what it even is before I do that.

It is interesting to me that anzac is scratched into the side because that would be the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps and so I can't help but wonder if it was re-arsenaled and transferred to them before being given to a bored soldier who thought it was too plain looking and decided to decorate their revolver.  The re-serialing obviously is throwing me for a loop because it looks like any finish it has is applied over the top, which is why I am leaning towards an arsenal having done it. It's also likely that then sometime after it made it to the states was when the .45 acp conversion as made but that is all speculation as I can't find a lot of info on these at all or anything even similar.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SageEBR:
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By SageEBR:
Originally Posted By Dracster:
Originally Posted By JPK:
The marking on the cylinder appear to be British proof marks

ETA: perhaps re-proof marks?
Export proofs. The Brit Proof House Laws require anything leaving the country to have the various test marks.

OP, it's been reserial'd. You can see a shelf in front of the trigger guard. That part should be the same height from the end of the trigger guard forward. It's also obviously hand-stamped given the orientation of the numbers.
Interesting, any idea if this a known practice that some arsenal did on these during a refurbish process or is it more likely this entire pistol was worked over by a gunsmith? I have never been able to find much on these like I have been able to find on many other military pistols over the years.
No idea. The Brits converted many to .45 ACP since we gave them a bunch of Colt and S&W M1917s as Lend Lease. I doubt they would reserial though. The bad part is a standard .45 ACP/AR load is the same pressure as a .455 proof load. A steady diet can burst the cylinder.
Yes, years back I initially got this on a whim just so I could shoot .45 through it then while also enjoying it as one of the neatest looking revolvers of all time. Once I read up on it and the pressure difference, I decided that was a bad idea and have only ever run a handful through. I am considering selling to fund a real .45acp revolver so was trying to figure out what it even is before I do that.

It is interesting to me that anzac is scratched into the side because that would be the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps and so I can't help but wonder if it was re-arsenaled and transferred to them before being given to a bored soldier who thought it was too plain looking and decided to decorate their revolver.  The re-serialing obviously is throwing me for a loop because it looks like any finish it has is applied over the top, which is why I am leaning towards an arsenal having done it. It's also likely that then sometime after it made it to the states was when the .45 acp conversion as made but that is all speculation as I can't find a lot of info on these at all or anything even similar.
when they were released from service they were  still in 455 eley,

the importer/exporter would modify them either at the place off purchase (Birmingham (BNP proof on barrel)) , if bought from the UK, or whatever foreign country) or shave the cylinders here in the US,

the commonwealth countries switched from .455 or .38/200 to 9mm,

they did not convert any of the big Webley's for military use to 45acp
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