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8/16/2022 4:37:09 PM
Posted: 3/24/2020 5:12:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: AmericanSheepDog]
Hey guys. Been AFK for a little while. As I always say, the Army is keeping me busy. Anyways, lets get down to it.  

I contacted the arms curator of the National Infantry Museum, Chris A. Goodrow, here at Fort Benning about coming in to analyze some of his weapons and help to catalog them. He graciously allowed me to come in before i started Armor BOLC on 26 AUG 2019, when these pictures were taken. I have since graduated ABOLC and the Scout Leader Course (formerly Army Reconaissance Course) and have finally gotten around to putting the images up on imgur and writing this up. Like at the West Point Museum, I will also be writing a report for the National Infantry Museum when I get the time to say thanks for allowing me to come in. Please enjoy the pictures and information below.  I will not be putting all of the pictures in the thread, so please click the red hyperlinked text to see the rest of the pictures.

Artillerie Inrichtingen AR-10 SN 4478

I am not an expert on the AR-10, but I can say that this weapon is in great condition. From the historical property sheet that was provided to me, it can be seen that this rifle was acquired on 13 MAR 1973 from a guy by the name of Robert S. McNamara. Anybody ever heard of him? According to the sheet, the weapon was presented to him by Colt while he was the SECDEF. Member @HHollow provided me with some information since he is the resident AR-10 expert. This AR-10 is identical to the rifles tested at Aberdeen Proving ground in late 1960. It has the typical four-piece handguard and fiber reinforced buttstock with rubber buttpad. The lower receiver markings are engraved, not rolled. Like the Portuguese contract rifles, it has the modern selector marking pattern, unlike the earlier AR-10s.


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

ArmaLite AR-15 SN 13 (Album I)
Album II

Information on the other prototype rifles can be found in my ArmaLite Prototype Guide found here.

I was able to find the following information about this rifle:

Tested by the Infantry Board at Fort Benning, Georgia between 24 February 1958 and 27 May 1958. Subjected to a semiautomatic fire test, where it fired 1287 rounds with 4.9% malfunctions per 100 rounds fired. Subjected to an automatic fire test, where it fired 136 rounds with 2.9% malfunctions per 100 rounds fired. Underwent an artificial rain test. 100 rounds were fired with 0 stoppages. Underwent hot weather testing and was exposed to 125 degrees F for 72 hours. 100 rounds were fired with 1 stoppage. With regard to the Infantry Board's test, Eugene Stoner said in his personal notes on 18 April 1958, "#13 (2) has been going since Wednesday and still going. It is in its 31st lane and is certainly raising hell with the averages. Still plagued by sticking triggers." On 19 April 1958, he said, "#13 (2) finally stopped in the 33 lane, 165 firing points, 990 rounds fired. The rest of the rifles were doing well."

I had two notes on its condition. First, upon disassembly I discovered that both the firing pin retaining pin and the firing pin were broken. I tilted the bolt carrier upside down to remove the firing pin and only the head came out. I freaked out because I thought I was the one who had broken it. The curator said that he believes that the firing pin was either broken during the test or another time during its stay at the museum, freeing me of guilt. The broken parts were documented and photographed by the museum staff separately from the photographs I took. I also tried to install the pivot pin in the correct direction (Left to Right), but I couldn't get the thing to come out. So it will remain installed improperly (Right to Left). Finally, I discovered that #13 is rack number "2" in the series of rifles that have one painted on the right side of the magazine well. Another thing to note was the fact that the handguard had one or two millimeters of forward and backward play in it. I can understand why it would have felt like a "toy" in the 50's for this reason alone (and its extreme light weight).

The report where some of the above information came from can be found below:
Report of Project Nr 2787, Evaluation of Small Caliber High Velocity Rifles - ArmaLite (AR-15)


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Winchester Lightweight Military Rifle, Caliber .224 SN 5

I know just enough about these rifles to be dangerous, but probably not as much as @imarangemaster, who has built a clone of his own from a Mini-14. I have read the SCHV reports comparing this weapon to the AR-15, which show that it was quite finicky and did not perform well in the field environment. It is interesting to note that this is receiver number 5 but it has the bolt from number 4 in it, which further supports the claim that the rifle did not perform well in the field. It fired the .224E2, which was very similar to the .222 Special (which would go on to become the .223/5.56) but was slightly shorter in overall length. Thus, in the SCHV tests, it was decided that both the AR-15 and Winchester Lightweight Military Rifle would use the .224E2 round. It was small and handy, and felt like it would make a great ranch rifle or truck gun. I wish I could buy one today. I think the closest modern-day rifle to this would be the Ingram SAM-1. Good luck obtaining one of those... I took a measurement of the barrel for anybody who wants to clone one from a Mini-14.

I was able to find the following information about this rifle:

According to the Infantry Board report found here (and below), this rifle was tested by the Infantry Board at Fort Benning, Georgia in the summer (July-ish) of 1958. First, it was subjected to a semiautomatic fire test, where it fired 276 rounds with 16.7% malfunctions per 100 rounds fired. It was then subjected to an automatic fire test, where it fired 210 rounds with 24.3% malfunctions per 100 rounds fired. Underwent an adverse condition test, where it was submerged in muddy water. 144 rounds were fired with 32 stoppages. The weapon was fired while being exposed to artificially generated sand and dust. It fired 10 rounds with 10 malfunctions. It was fired while subjected to artificial rain. 100 rounds were fired with 2 stoppages. Underwent hot weather testing and was exposed to 125 degrees F for 72 hours. 100 rounds were fired with 2 stoppages. After this test, the trigger housing was cracked after a total of 2,898 rounds had been fired.

The Infantry Board noted the following deficiencies and suggested modifications:
Major Deficiencies (those needing correction to be suitable for Army use):
1) Trigger housing is too weak and cracks or breaks after approximately 2,800 rounds. Correct by strengthening trigger housing or by removing the breakage force.
2) Projectiles disintegrate when fired into sand, reducing penetration. Correct by thickening projectile jacket or providing steel cored projectile.
3) Rifle-ammunition combination produces flash, which reveals the position of the firer in combat. Correct by providing an integral flash suppressor.
4) Sights cannot be adjusted for windage or elevation, preventing the weapon from being properly zeroed.

Minor Deficiencies (those the correction or elimination of which will increase the efficiency or desirability of the weapon):
1) The safety is awkward to handle. They claim the safety is poorly located and requires considerable force to operate when dirty.
2) The safety is not inaudible, which reveals the position of the firer in combat.
3) The safety projects too far from the weapon and catches on brush, wire, etc.
4) The weapon cannot be put on safe when the bolt is open, creating a safety hazard.
5) The weapon cannot be loaded or unloaded when on safe, creating a safety hazard.
6) The rocker drops out of the weapon during disassembly, making it easy to lose. Correct by making rocker an integral part of the receiver.
7) Rocker can be improperly positioned, causing the weapon to fire automatically on semi-automatic setting. Correct by making rocker an integral part of the receiver.
8) Gas cylinder is not strong enough, causing it to crack.
9) Trigger produces excessive trigger slap when firing automatic fire, producing firer fatigue.
10) Requires special lubricant (Molykote), creating an additional item in the supply chain.
11) Trigger sticks to the rear when particles of dirt, dust, etc., get into trigger mechanism.
12) Magazine spring is not strong enough, causing failures to feed.
13) Weapon fires semi-automatically on automatic setting when trigger mechanism gets dirty.
14) Weapon exhibits undue sensitivity to sand and dust, failing to function properly.
15) Projectiles deflect considerably when fired through brush, reducing hit probability.
16) Rifle-ammunition combination produces smoke, revealing the position of the firer in combat.
17) Rifle is not sufficiently accurate in automatic fire role when fired from the prone position. Fails to meet requirement imposed by military characteristics.
18) Rifle and magazine follower too susceptible to rust, shortening the life of the weapon and follower.

I have not found any mention of number 5 in the Aberdeen test report. Nonetheless, below are Aberdeen's recommendations regarding the Winchester Lightweight Military Rifle:

From Aberdeen testing, it was recommended:
1) The mechanism be redesigned to improve the function and endurance.
2) The automatic fire feature be eliminated.
3) The barrel be redesigned to give a higher level of safety when fired under adverse conditions and improved accuracy.
4) The rear sight be replaced with one which permits elevation and windage adjustments.

Report can be found here:
Report of Project Nr 2787, Evaluation of Small Caliber High Velocity Rifles - Winchester


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Colt 601 SN 11477 (experimental left-side forward assist rifle)

This rifle is an apparent example created in the Colt Tool Room in an effort to meet the Army's requirement for a bolt closure device (forward assist). It is known that Eugene Stoner highly advised against this because he felt that forcing a casing that would not seat properly into the chamber would only compound any issue. However, Colt wanted to sell rifles, so they obliged.  Note that the forward assist is crudely welded to the side of the receiver. The Colt Tool Room literally cut out a hole from the receiver and welded the part on. I have read the report regarding the experimental bolt closure devices and it should also be noted that rifles selected for modification were the ones in the worst condition. Therefore, this rifle was likely used and abused in testing by the Infantry Board before being modified. The barrel has an "S" between the legs of the FSB and a "C" at the 12 o'clock of the receiver extension. Not much is known about 601 barrel markings, as they were not standardized so it is difficult to say whether or not this is a Winchester or a Colt barrel. Some things to note on this rifle. First, I was told that the BCG pictured was the correct one for the rifle, which would not make sense considering that it is notched for a right-handed forward assist. However, it is possible that the bolt carrier was replaced in testing, once the left-sided forward assist was deemed unacceptable. Next, note the "12" written on the right side of the upper receiver. Finally, i think the orange-ish/purple-ish color inside and on the bottom of the upper receiver is really cool.


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Colt 601 SN 12476 (experimental charging handle forward assist rifle)

Like the above rifle, this is another apparent example created in an effort to meet the Army's requirement for a bolt closure device (forward assist). The barrel has a "W" or "M" (I don't know if we have ever figured out which one it actually is) between the legs of the FSB and appears to have a very faint "C" at the 12 o'clock of the receiver extension. As with the above rifle, this one was likely well used during testing with the Infantry Board and was thus selected for modification. Note the purple hue in the anodizing. Very cool!


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Colt GX-5856 (606) SN 14784

This weapon was created to compete in the Small Arms Weapon Systems (SAWS) testing program in early 1965 as one of Colt's entries from the new "CAR-15" Weapon System. This model is a Colt 606 (CAR-15 Heavy Barreled Automatic Rifle M1) supplied for testing, which received its own designation of "Government Experimental 5856." This weapon was intended to be used as a squad automatic weapon, and came with an M2 bipod. The barrel is nearly the same thickness the entire length and the weapon weighs approximately 12 lbs. Only about 200 GX weapons were produced. Because I only had one day in the museum (and had taken one of these apart at West Point), I opted not to go into that great of detail on this rifle. We generally know how rifles of this era came equipped, so i took some quick photographs with the rifle still attached to the display case to either confirm or deny those assumptions.


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Colt GX-5857 (607) SN 14617

As with the GX-5856, this weapon was designed to compete in the SAWS trials in early 1965 as a "SMG," though does not meet the definition of an SMG by modern standards. Of the weapons that Colt entered into the tests, the GX-5857, or model 607 was the only one that gained any interest. After the tests, a contract for 2,050 CAR-15 SMGs was signed. The weapon would ultimately evolve into the XM177E1 "Commando" and the XM-177E2. As with the 606, I did not feel I had enough time in the museum and had previously taken one of these apart at West Point.  Therefore, I opted to take a few photographs while the weapon was still attached to the display case to confirm or deny assumptions.


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Experimental XM177E1 (609) SN 30033

I only had a short period of time with this weapon and was not able to obtain the bolt carrier. I have the chance to go back to the museum and look at those parts later and will add the details as necessary.  Note that this weapon was built on a 602 lower receiver. It appears to me that the moderator is longer than those typically found on XM177E1s as well. It almost looks like one from an E2 without the grenade ring to me? I also found the black buffer interesting. Any information/speculation on this weapon would be much appreciated.


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

XM177E2 (629) SN 905935

Again, I did not have a long time with this weapon and did not have the opportunity to inspect the bolt carrier group. Again, I took a few pictures with the weapon still attached to the display case. It has an "MP" marked barrel and also has a black buffer, which I hadn't seen until this day. I like the color of the delta ring on this rifle as well.


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

M231 Firing Port Weapon SN 5300879

I pretty much know nothing about these, but I know people like to clone them.  I thought you guys would appreciate seeing another example. Don't these fire from the open bolt? If so, why the forward assist?


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

M21 Sniper Rifle SN 580102

I also know nothing about these, and yet this is the second M-21 I have examined. I know enough to know that the magazine release is missing. The museum believes that this rifle was put together by the Marksmanship Unit specifically to be a display piece, and therefore they do not believe it has ever seen combat. I am looking for anyone who might be able to tell me the details on this rifle so that I can put them into my report.  


Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

Courtesy National Infantry Museum Collection, United States Army

@VA-gunnut please give this a thumbtack beneath my West Point thread if possible. Thank you, I hope everybody enjoys!
Link Posted: 3/24/2020 9:16:30 PM EDT
[#1]
I, for one, think this is definitely worth a tack.
Thanks for taking the time to share all this!
Link Posted: 3/24/2020 10:02:39 PM EDT
[#2]
Well thank you. Happy to do it once I finally got around to it.
Link Posted: 3/24/2020 10:38:09 PM EDT
[#3]
Wow, THANK YOU!!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/25/2020 3:59:44 AM EDT
[#4]
TOP PICS GREAT POST!!!!
Link Posted: 3/25/2020 7:48:33 AM EDT
[#5]
Fantastic Post and most definitely should be tacked like your West Point Post.
Link Posted: 3/25/2020 9:12:52 AM EDT
[#6]
Super!  Thank you for sharing.
Link Posted: 3/25/2020 10:03:13 AM EDT
[#7]
Awesome pictures! Love it
Link Posted: 3/25/2020 12:35:26 PM EDT
[#8]
Great pics!  Thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 3/26/2020 11:36:24 AM EDT
[#9]
Information added under Winchester Lightweight Military Rifle SN 5, including test data from Fort Benning.
Link Posted: 3/26/2020 1:10:56 PM EDT
[#10]
Great pictures and information. Thank you very much!
Link Posted: 3/26/2020 2:22:52 PM EDT
[#11]
Thanks for taking the time to document these historic specimens.
Link Posted: 3/30/2020 1:02:58 PM EDT
[#12]
Thank you for taking the time and effort in this daunting task, we all certainly appreciate it!
What is it going to take to get it tacked???
Link Posted: 3/30/2020 1:35:58 PM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jbzz71:
Thank you for taking the time and effort in this daunting task, we all certainly appreciate it!
What is it going to take to get it tacked???
View Quote


The attention of one of the mods. I tagged one so far.
Link Posted: 3/31/2020 6:36:55 PM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AmericanSheepDog:
@VA-gunnut please give this a thumbtack beneath my West Point thread if possible.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AmericanSheepDog:
@VA-gunnut please give this a thumbtack beneath my West Point thread if possible.


Originally Posted By AmericanSheepDog:
Originally Posted By jbzz71:
Thank you for taking the time and effort in this daunting task, we all certainly appreciate it!
What is it going to take to get it tacked???


The attention of one of the mods. I tagged one so far.


@Aimless ???
Link Posted: 3/31/2020 8:27:36 PM EDT
[#15]
Outstanding!

Is that the museum that was relocated from APG?
Link Posted: 3/31/2020 8:29:31 PM EDT
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cycolac:
Outstanding!

Is that the museum that was relocated from APG?
View Quote


APG?

And as far as I’m aware, this museum has been here for some time. Not sure how long.
Link Posted: 3/31/2020 10:24:46 PM EDT
[#17]
Outstanding post.  Thank you again for your efforts.
Link Posted: 4/1/2020 8:23:35 PM EDT
[#18]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AmericanSheepDog:


APG?

And as far as I’m aware, this museum has been here for some time. Not sure how long.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AmericanSheepDog:
Originally Posted By Cycolac:
Outstanding!

Is that the museum that was relocated from APG?


APG?

And as far as I’m aware, this museum has been here for some time. Not sure how long.


Aberdeen Proving Ground, the Ordnance museum there was a victim of BRAC.

The Ordnance museum is being relocated to Fort Lee, Virginia.
Link Posted: 4/1/2020 8:26:27 PM EDT
[#19]
Ah okay, didn’t know the acronym. And yes, I was about to say that. Moved to Fort Lee.
Link Posted: 4/2/2020 6:39:08 PM EDT
[#20]
Super cool!
Link Posted: 12/13/2020 11:29:13 PM EDT
[#21]
Nice work, OP.
Link Posted: 1/1/2021 8:16:01 PM EDT
[#22]
Cool, thanks for posting. Wish I had some extra time at Ft. Benning to be able to see the Infantry Museum. Wish they would have taken us recruits through it.
Link Posted: 1/2/2021 10:24:21 PM EDT
[#23]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By -Omega-1:
Cool, thanks for posting. Wish I had some extra time at Ft. Benning to be able to see the Infantry Museum. Wish they would have taken us recruits through it.
View Quote


It opened in 2009 and they do do that now
Link Posted: 1/2/2021 10:55:50 PM EDT
[#24]
Super cool op.


I havent been there in many years.
Link Posted: 1/2/2021 11:43:13 PM EDT
[#25]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AmericanSheepDog:


It opened in 2009 and they do do that now
View Quote


Ah, well 25 years too late. Still, thanks for sharing the pics.
Link Posted: 1/3/2021 1:04:44 AM EDT
[#26]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By -Omega-1:


Ah, well 25 years too late. Still, thanks for sharing the pics.
View Quote


Np, happy to share.
Link Posted: 1/3/2021 1:20:38 AM EDT
[#27]
Link Posted: 2/20/2021 12:14:04 AM EDT
[#28]
This makes me want to head 30min down the road and take some pics of the Rock Island Arsenal Museum for you guys.

They have some of the same kinda stuff including pistols from the M9 trials, experimental M16's, M14's, M1 Garands, and a gold plated M60
Link Posted: 2/20/2021 12:58:23 AM EDT
[#29]
I would like to get there eventually
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