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Posted: 1/23/2006 7:03:13 PM EDT
So, I was at Sportsman's Warehouse today (just built, my new favorite store) checking out some revolvers with a friend who is looking for one. I'm looking at a Taurus or something, and I lightly spin the cylinder, and in doing so it snaps about halfway into the frame.

The grizzled old man behind the counter snaps at me to "not do it like that." I had no idea what he was talking about, and he said it's the worst thing one can do to a revolver.

Now, I don't have a lot of experience with revolvers so I very well could be wrong, but it seems to me this guy was overreacting a bit, especially since I didn't smack it shut or anything...
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 7:19:41 PM EDT
you can smack it as much as you like once you buy it. don't play young guns with guns that don't belong to you.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 7:28:30 PM EDT
Well, that's the thing. I didn't even mean to do it, and the guy acted like the gun would have fallen to pieces if it happened once more. I'm just curious if that is actually a fact regarding revolvers.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 7:57:19 PM EDT
It probably didn't hurt anything but it can be very bad on a revolver. You could bend a cylinder stop pretty easily.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 8:15:44 PM EDT
He overreacted, but he is also correct.
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 8:41:09 PM EDT
I would think repeated slamming would be necessary to cause any harm, but I understand where he was coming from. Just seemd to be a bit of an a-hole. Then a minute later he snapped at two little kids leaning on one of the glass counters. Definitely what I would call 'grizzled.'
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 9:25:48 PM EDT
Do it enough and you'll bend the crane. And then wonder why/ how your cylinder went out of time or started shaving bullets.

Gun etiquette-wise, sort of in the same league as letting the slide slame home on a .45 without holding the trigger back (to save the hammer/sear engagement).

So WATCH IT THERE, ya young WHIPPERSNAPPER
Link Posted: 1/23/2006 9:37:13 PM EDT
Slamming the cylinder open and shut with a flick of the wrist is known as "Bogarting" the gun.
It's damaging and is on the same level as someone slamming your new car's door shut as hard as they can slam it.

So he was a grouch. So's the customer looking at the gun later and notices some scuffing or damage from the slam, and accuses the shop of trying to sell him a used or abused gun.

In many shops, if it's an accident, you get yelled at. On purpose, you're shown the door.
As above, go into a car dealer and slam the door on a luxury car as hard as you can, and see what happens.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 5:05:46 AM EDT
I was checking out a "new" S&W in a now defunct shop (Arizona Sportsman @ Southern & Stapley) once, the timing and lockup seemed pretty bad for a new gun. When I handed it back to the "salesman" he twirled it around, spun the cylinder and slammed it shut with the wrist flick move!!

Gee, guess I'll cross that one off the list.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 5:13:12 AM EDT
It's kinda like emptying your shotgun by racking the live rounds thru the action.

It's the sign of a truely unprofessional shooter.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 5:17:01 AM EDT
It actually bends the Crane witch is the piece that swings out, and can cuase it to shave lead.

t.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 5:57:44 AM EDT
It makes the baby JESUS cry too!
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 6:07:18 AM EDT
I think he reacted pretty calmly. Id have smacked you upside the head with the revolver you just abused...but thats me.
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 8:09:15 AM EDT
Ok, just to be clear. I didn't flick it shut Hollywood style. I lightly spun the cylinder which accidentally caused it to engage about 2/3 into the frame. I don't blame the guy for saying something, but it seemed like a bit much and I was just trying to find out what the deal was. Thanks.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 3:34:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 2hawk:
Do it enough and you'll bend the crane. And then wonder why/ how your cylinder went out of time or started shaving bullets.

Gun etiquette-wise, sort of in the same league as letting the slide slame home on a .45 without holding the trigger back (to save the hammer/sear engagement).

So WATCH IT THERE, ya young WHIPPERSNAPPER



Bingo!
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 4:01:12 PM EDT
imagine how many people who are clueless about firearms he has to babysit on a daily basis. no wonder he growled at you.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 10:58:38 AM EDT
The "Bogart" move described above is the one to stay away from, depending on how you do it you can misalign the crane. The problem is trying to leverage the full weight of the cylinder through the relatively small mass of the crane.

There's nothing you can really do about cranks, but as far as the gun goes you can close the cylinder as fast as humanly possible without causing damage to the gun. Hundreds of us do it thousands of times per year in shooting competitions where speed reloads are required. Just be sure you're moving the mass of the cylinder by moving the cylinder; the comparatively light crane will follow along without protest as long as you allow the cylinder to roll slightly as the gun is closed.

It's also possible he was concerned about the cylinder stop. Spinning the cylinder and slamming it shut could cause a crash between the cylinder stop and one of the cylinder notchs. This is a definate no-no. If a cylinder notch is wrecked the only remedy is replacement, which could be half the original cost of the gun.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 7:08:54 PM EDT
I never understood why everybody I've ever seen handle a revolver could'nt resist the urge to give the cylinder a good "roulette" spin? I mean if you want to check for binding or what not, rolling it slowly with your fingers would tell you much more.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 2:33:38 PM EDT
Please explain proper procedure for unloading live rounds from a pump shotgun. thanks.


Originally Posted By demigod:
It's kinda like emptying your shotgun by racking the live rounds thru the action.

It's the sign of a truely unprofessional shooter.

Link Posted: 1/29/2006 3:49:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Slacker:
Please explain proper procedure for unloading live rounds from a pump shotgun. thanks.


Originally Posted By demigod:
It's kinda like emptying your shotgun by racking the live rounds thru the action.

It's the sign of a truely unprofessional shooter.




Much safer to use the stop at the rear of the tube magazine. Press in on it with controlled force and you can pop out one round at a time, until the weapon is empty, without racking the pump.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 2:51:40 AM EDT

Much safer to use the stop at the rear of the tube magazine. Press in on it with controlled force and you can pop out one round at a time, until the weapon is empty, without racking the pump.


Thanks, V_G. I'm not sure what the "stop" is that your referring to. I've got an 870 in my lap for reference.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 9:13:22 AM EDT
Turn the 870 so that the shell lifter is up, i.e., upside down. Push the lifter up, and look at the rear of the tube. There are two shell stops that keep the shells in the tube until depressed. If you push on one of them, cant remember wich onw ithout looking, the shells will fall right out.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 5:57:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By patrol120:
Turn the 870 so that the shell lifter is up, i.e., upside down. Push the lifter up, and look at the rear of the tube. There are two shell stops that keep the shells in the tube until depressed. If you push on one of them, cant remember wich onw ithout looking, the shells will fall right out.



On Mossbergs its the stop on the port side of the gun (left side when upright pointing forward) I seem to recall its the same with 870's, been a while since I trained with those.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 7:17:06 PM EDT
yes, it is the port side. I just played with my 870 a while ago.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:05:30 PM EDT
What's the chances that we can get back to handgun discussion in this topic?
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 8:51:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2006 8:52:51 AM EDT by jchewie]

Originally Posted By GUNGUY1911:
I never understood why everybody I've ever seen handle a revolver could'nt resist the urge to give the cylinder a good "roulette" spin? I mean if you want to check for binding or what not, rolling it slowly with your fingers would tell you much more.



Cowboy movies and the old single action revolver spin the cylinder to check if 6 rounds are in place.

Basically because they don't know what the hell they are doing.
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