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Posted: 1/18/2006 7:03:00 PM EDT
I asked this in a thread about the CV-22 Upper .22 Conversion, but thought I'd field it again in a more appropriate thread.

I ordered a CV-22, and know when breaking in a high power, precision barrel, you clean the barrel before hand, paying particular attention to minute metal burs that can be left around from the manufacturing process, then thoroughly clean the barrel after each round for the first 10-25 rounds (depending on who you ask/what you read), then after the next 5-10 three round groups (straight out of the Army Sniper Manual, SOTIC, and many GunMags).

Due to the differences in rounds, copper jacket v. not, impact this, or should the barrel be broken in the same regardless.

Any assistance, advice will be greatly appreciated.

THX
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:23:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RetiredSFMajor:
when breaking in a high power, precision barrel, you clean the barrel before hand, paying particular attention to minute metal burs that can be left around from the manufacturing process, then thoroughly clean the barrel after each round for the first 10-25 rounds (depending on who you ask/what you read), then after the next 5-10 three round groups (straight out of the Army Sniper Manual, SOTIC, and many GunMags).
THX



This is very arguable. I think the fight over these Voodoo tricks for "breaking in" a barrel will be around for ever.... whether it's true or not.

I always break in fresh barrels with the mindset to take it easy for a few rounds. Sure, clean before you shoot, then I might clean after the first round, then maybe after the first magazine. Then maybe after the first 100rnds. But then I'm done. I've talked to too many very knowledgable firearm professionals who say it's huey.

If I were you, I'd take that approach with the gun. Clean the barrel initially, then MAYBE clean after the first shot. Then once after 5 shots. Then next after 100 perhaps.

Just what I would do, right or wrong.

Gundraw
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 12:54:37 PM EDT
GunDraw, Thanks for the thoughts, this is really an interesting topic. There are tons of internet articles, most of which directly dispute one another...Gale McMillan of McMillan stocks and custom barrel maker fame says that no one has yet to explain to him what the one shot/clean routine does except use up barrel life!!!...Ed Brown Customs say the one shot/clean x 10 (which they say they do for you at the factory) followed by five shot/clean up to 25 rounds is essential for maximum barrel accuracy. Compass Lake Engineering, and you, probably have the best outlook...clean it, shoot it somewhere up to around 20 rounds, clean it, 20 or so more and then clean it whenever you get back from the range. I think thats what I'm going with when the upper gets here.

Odds are that if it makes a true difference in the accuracy, I wont realize it. I bought the .22 upper to maintain my 5-7 meter CQB skills in an indoor range and dont plan on doing any long range precision shooting anyway.

Link Posted: 1/20/2006 10:29:34 AM EDT
More .22 rimfire barrels have been worn out with cleaning rods, than ever will be with bullets.

A modern rimfire bullet is very easy on the bore. As long as you don't shoot ammo that has been dropped on the ground, the barrel will last indefinitely.

I have been shooting the same barrel in my 52D for 40 years. It still shoots well enough to win matches.

I bought a browning BL 22 the first year of manufacture. Since it was complicated to disassemble, and I refuse to shove a rod down the muzzle - it rarely gets cleaned. I can recall spans of 5,000 rounds without any maintence beyond lubrication. It still shoots just fine.



Lem

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Link Posted: 1/20/2006 2:44:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lem:
More .22 rimfire barrels have been worn out with cleaning rods, than ever will be with bullets.

A modern rimfire bullet is very easy on the bore. As long as you don't shoot ammo that has been dropped on the ground, the barrel will last indefinitely.

I have been shooting the same barrel in my 52D for 40 years. It still shoots well enough to win matches.

I bought a browning BL 22 the first year of manufacture. Since it was complicated to disassemble, and I refuse to shove a rod down the muzzle - it rarely gets cleaned. I can recall spans of 5,000 rounds without any maintence beyond lubrication. It still shoots just fine.



Lem

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Will definitely agree with you on that. I've yet to find a .22 that the barrel was shot out. I had a friend who "claims" he's worn out either 1 or 2 (I stopped paying attention) ruger MkIIs to the point they had no rifling left. I call it B.S. as I know mine has been through 10's of thousands of .22's and it shoots like the day I bought it. Not to mention the other .22's I've handled that have been around since the 60's.. Once again, cleaning and finish wear were the only things I could ever seen. NEver a worn out barrel. I'd like to see some hard experimental data on this. I bet even we would be amazed how long one will last!

Gundraw
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 4:11:26 PM EDT
GunDraw:

Hell, I've been shooting my 52D since the mid 1960's - and it was used when I got it!

I have bought .22's by the five thousand round case many times. I can only guess at the round count on some of my rimfires, but I know the 52 is way past the 15k mark. The BL 22 has seen at least 10k, it was the gun all of the nieces and nephews learned to shoot with.

Your friend should quit dropping his ammo in the sand, before he loads his MKII's. My Mark ONE is still in good shape.

I have seen a 10/22 with the rifling missing in the last 2 inches of the barrel. Had nothing to do with shooting it however. It had been cleaned repeatedly with an aluminum rod - probably every trip to the range. The barrel had less than 1500 rounds, and it was junk.


I too would like to see the actual data on rimfire barrel life.



Lem

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